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Old 12-19-2007, 05:25 PM   #11
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Poppin,

I have some creations like this in my memory banks. Is it necessary to have both the glaze and sauce? I was thinking more along the lines of a thick glaz-y type 'sauce' all in one.
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Old 12-19-2007, 06:13 PM   #12
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I'm sure there is a way to do it all in one, and I fully intend to figure out how to do it...thing is, it's less than a week before Christmas, and if I eat much more lamb trying to perfect things, I'm not gonna want any when I make the piece de resistance :P.

What I've been doing with the chops so far though (and while not exactly what you are talking about, is close) is I drizzle the lamb with the sauce after it's cooked and let it set for a few minutes. So there's not actually any "dipping" involved, but yeah, it's a separate step so far. Imperfect though it may be.

The problem I ran into was even though the way I did it on the pork was "all in one", the pork was marinating in it for a while, which changed the dymanics of what I was doing. Since the crown won't be marinating it, I had to break it apart.

One thing that immediately comes to mind is cooking down the cherries and invocating that into the glaze, but I worry that it would thin the glaze a little too much at that point. Some form of a gelling agent might do the trick, but at this point in thinking this through I'm just throwing darts at a wall.
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Old 12-19-2007, 09:07 PM   #13
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I make a sauce for duck or pork that includes creme de cassis, sugar and seeded/halved grapes. I use about 2 cups of cassis to 3/4-1 cup of sugar.....something like that. I add the grapes and let it reduce down. Made candy once-lol

It's not as sweet as it sounds and goes very well with the two meats. I always wanted to make it a little more savory.

I think the more the cherries cook, the thicker the sauce will be. I would try the sauce and fresh cherries before adding a thickener. Corn starch may work if you needed it. Make a slurry with some sauce in a coffee mug first.
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Old 12-26-2007, 07:29 PM   #14
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Turned out alright. I ran into a bit of a snag in that I didn't have enough balsamic for the recipe, so I ended up cutting it with some red wine vinegar. Not really happy with what resulted in that, but fortunately it didn't detract too much from what I was going for.
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Old 12-26-2007, 09:25 PM   #15
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I made a crown pork roast a while back (as seen in my avatar and as a posted picture on this site). But instead of making a glaze to put on it, I let the natural meat flavor dominate after marinating in a citrus based marinade. The citrus was mild and didn't call attention to itself. Rather, it enhanced the natural pork flavor.

Lamb is much like pork, but with a slight gaminess reminiscant of venison, or goat. The meat works well with many fo the same herbs, spices, and fruity flavors as does pork. And the crown roast shape allows you to place a force-meat, stuffing, or fruity filliing on top. I used fried rice with a hint of 5-spice powder and mandarin oranges on top of my crown roast. I also cooked my roast between a divided bed of charcoal with apple-wood, again to enhance, not overpower. Bring the lamb up to your desired temperature with a meat thermometer telling you when it's done and you almost can't mess this meal up.

And the longer rib-bones of the lamb provide such drama to the dish.

I believe that I'm too late for the meal as you have already made it. But file this info in the back of your mind, or in a file to use for future versions of this classic roast.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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