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Old 07-07-2008, 08:02 PM   #1
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Leg 'O Lamb

First, I have to admit that I have never prepared one before. I was scared off a rack of Lamb, because, I read that it is hard to do right. Most all of the recipies I see callfor a bone in Leg.

I'm behind the gun here. I bought a 2# boneless Leg. Have I messed up? What is the difference in cooking time between bone in / bone out? What seasonings are appropriate?

TIA

AC

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Old 07-07-2008, 08:35 PM   #2
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Definately Garlic and rosemary match lamb beautifully, and of course olive oil or a Ghee and salt and pepper, ground cumin goes nicely as well. As fas as difference in cooking time I dont think it will make much difference if you plan to cook it low and slow for very tender meat. Next time I would reccomend keeping the bone for added flavor. You can still have it deboned and ask to keep the bone so you may use it as a roasting rack in your pan and to add extra flavor as I said. Good luck! Hope I helped :)
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Old 07-07-2008, 09:39 PM   #3
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Boneless leg is fine. I'm assuming it's fabricated out and is flat (similar to how a flank steak might look)? An easy and delicious method would be to make a puree or "pesto" of garlic, herbs, pinenuts, and breadcrumbs, lay it on the inside of the leg, then roll it up and tie it. Don't forget to generously season the lamb with salt and pepper on both sides before you roll it up. Sear the lamb until golden brown on all sides, then roast in a 400 degree oven until medium doneness, or about a 135-140 degree internal temp. Remove the lamb from the hot pan and let rest for 5-7 minutes before slicing.
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Old 07-07-2008, 09:57 PM   #4
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I agree 100% with the above. Boneless leg is also great on the grill. A Greek marinade of onions and garlic sliced and sauteed in olive oil with rosemary and lemmons sliced (let cool) is great. Lamb can be marinated a few hours or overnight. Grill over direct heat to sear and then slightly indirect to finish cooking. (a kettle grill or gas grill with lid is best) Medium rare is great. 135*-140*.
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Old 07-07-2008, 11:23 PM   #5
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i have only made one leg of lamb in my life, for a guest. roasted in the oven.
i just don't like it. not even lamb chops, something fatty tasting to me. just me, i am sure.

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Old 07-08-2008, 12:18 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by ironchef View Post
Boneless leg is fine. I'm assuming it's fabricated out and is flat (similar to how a flank steak might look)? An easy and delicious method would be to make a puree or "pesto" of garlic, herbs, pinenuts, and breadcrumbs, lay it on the inside of the leg, then roll it up and tie it. Don't forget to generously season the lamb with salt and pepper on both sides before you roll it up. Sear the lamb until golden brown on all sides, then roast in a 400 degree oven until medium doneness, or about a 135-140 degree internal temp. Remove the lamb from the hot pan and let rest for 5-7 minutes before slicing.
Very interesting, I always thought you had to go low and slow with lamb. I did a Sirloin Roast this way once and loved it (the cooking method not rolling it etc). On the 400F in the oven, about how much time per lb do you think? Maybe 3 minutes or 5 minutes? I would definitely be shooting for not above medium myself as that sounds perfect so I was thinking around those times.
Thanks!
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Old 07-08-2008, 10:09 AM   #7
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Mediterranean flavors are one way to go. I once made a leg of lamb for a St. Patrick's Day party. I had it deboned and made a marinade of oil, garlic, rosemary and mustard. Spread the marinade all over the inside of the meat, roll up, refrigerate overnight, and roast as IronChef described. It was great
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Old 07-08-2008, 10:16 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adillo303 View Post
First, I have to admit that I have never prepared one before. I was scared off a rack of Lamb, because, I read that it is hard to do right. Most all of the recipies I see callfor a bone in Leg.

I'm behind the gun here. I bought a 2# boneless Leg. Have I messed up? What is the difference in cooking time between bone in / bone out? What seasonings are appropriate?

TIA

AC
No, you haven't messed up! When I cook a boneless leg, I generally butterfly it and lay it open so it is half as think as before. Then I marinate it for a couple of hours in garlic, rosemary, lemon juice, olive oil, and then grill it

Oops! I just remembered that I have the recipe filed here at work, so here's the recipe! Just adjust the cooking time for the size of your roast. I like an instant read thermometer and cook to 130 degrees F. no higher.

Butterflied Leg of Lamb à la Provençale
This is one of the most delicious and spectacular dishes you can cook on your grill. Your guests will be totally wowed by how fabulous it tastes, and how quickly it cooks.

makes 8 servings

1 Leg of Lamb, trimmed and boned (approximately 5 pounds trimmed weight)
(Be sure to ask your butcher to remove the fell.)

Marinade:
1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
1 tablespoon fresh rosemary leaves
1 tablespoon fresh marjoram leaves
3 cloves garlic
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 lemon, juice and zest

1. Coarsely chop leaves and garlic. Add lemon zest and mix with oil and juice of the lemon. Rub lamb well, all over. Wrap in plastic, and marinate at least 1 hour. (You can let it sit up to three hours in the refrigerator.)
2. Grill over rosy red coals, or an electric range top grill, for 45 minutes (to 130 degrees F. internal). Or, you may roast it in the oven--375 degrees F. for 20 to 25 minutes, then slide under the broiler 2 minutes (to 125 degrees F. internal) to achieve that crusty grilled look.
3. Let sit at least 10 minutes before carving.

Wine Tip: Although Bordeaux-style wines traditionally pair with lamb, and will go nicely with this leg, I think the garlic and the grilling indicate a more robust wine. I¹d suggest any Provençal red, or a chewy Zinfandel from California.
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Old 07-08-2008, 12:31 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Maverick2272 View Post
Very interesting, I always thought you had to go low and slow with lamb. I did a Sirloin Roast this way once and loved it (the cooking method not rolling it etc). On the 400F in the oven, about how much time per lb do you think? Maybe 3 minutes or 5 minutes? I would definitely be shooting for not above medium myself as that sounds perfect so I was thinking around those times.
Thanks!
It's hard to say because there's several factors that can determine the length of cooking time. Best thing to do like always for roasts is to invest in a digital thermometer with a timer.
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Old 07-08-2008, 12:47 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by ironchef View Post
Boneless leg is fine. I'm assuming it's fabricated out and is flat (similar to how a flank steak might look)? An easy and delicious method would be to make a puree or "pesto" of garlic, herbs, pinenuts, and breadcrumbs, lay it on the inside of the leg, then roll it up and tie it. Don't forget to generously season the lamb with salt and pepper on both sides before you roll it up. Sear the lamb until golden brown on all sides, then roast in a 400 degree oven until medium doneness, or about a 135-140 degree internal temp. Remove the lamb from the hot pan and let rest for 5-7 minutes before slicing.
I've seen what you refer to called butterflied lamb leg, the netted legs called boneless. In either case, I usually stuff them and roast. For me, with lamb, the important thing is not to overcook it. Rosemary is my herb of choice for any lamb. Garlic is my herb of choice for anything.
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