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Old 05-01-2012, 04:10 PM   #31
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So let's see. We have covered feudal wars, wines, Easter lambs. Now in spite of my feeble attempt to learn anything here today, the only things I know for sure is; Never call a Sicilian an Italian. And only wine made in Chianti can have a basket on it.

I don't drink alcohol. Never have, never will. And even if I wanted to start at this late date, my meds will not allow it. They all say, Do not mix with alcohol! I am sure that I have had many a dish that has had alcohol in it. But being a non-drinker, if the alcohol isn't cooked off, I can tell right away with the first mouthful. Can you imagine what a child must taste? I have seen cooks add that dash of booze at the last minute. It is a case of more is better syndrome. I will fill up on the salad, and pass on the dinner stating how filling the salad was. So please all cooks, make sure you cook off the alcohol. Take pity on us non-drinkers.
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Old 05-01-2012, 05:31 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie
So let's see. We have covered feudal wars, wines, Easter lambs. Now in spite of my feeble attempt to learn anything here today, the only things I know for sure is; Never call a Sicilian an Italian. And only wine made in Chianti can have a basket on it.

I don't drink alcohol. Never have, never will. And even if I wanted to start at this late date, my meds will not allow it. They all say, Do not mix with alcohol! I am sure that I have had many a dish that has had alcohol in it. But being a non-drinker, if the alcohol isn't cooked off, I can tell right away with the first mouthful. Can you imagine what a child must taste? I have seen cooks add that dash of booze at the last minute. It is a case of more is better syndrome. I will fill up on the salad, and pass on the dinner stating how filling the salad was. So please all cooks, make sure you cook off the alcohol. Take pity on us non-drinkers.
You need to simmer for about 30 min, uncovered if you really want most of the alcohol to cook off. Yes, the boiling point is lower than water, but it does still take time for it to evaporate. The idea that there is no way anything cooked can have alcohol in it is a myth.

(it drives me crazy when people say that, so just wanted to throw that out there ;)

Here is a table from the USDA showing the amount of alcohol left in a dish after each listed cooking method and time.

Table from USDA Showing Percent of Alcohol Retained After Cooking
Preparation Method Percent of Alcohol Retained
alcohol added to boiling liquid & removed from heat 85%
alcohol flamed 75%
no heat, stored overnight 70%
baked, 25 minutes, alcohol not stirred into mixture 45%
baked/simmered, alcohol stirred into mixture:
15 minutes 40%
30 minutes 35%
1 hour 25%
1.5 hours 20%
2 hours 10%
2.5 hours 5%
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Old 05-02-2012, 03:10 AM   #33
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Margi this is the best side of the Adriatic, my wife and niece like to sunbathe here as it is quite. My wife is 20 yrs older than my niece which is which?
When we are here we live just over the hill.
Croatian Dreams :: 09092008018.mp4 video by Hvar2010 - Photobucket
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Old 05-02-2012, 05:31 AM   #34
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Wednesday 11am: Thanks for all your feedback

Good Morning Ladies & Gentlemen,

Firstly, let me begin with a historical influence on the high pastures of the Abruzzi e Molise regions of Italia, as these 2 regions come this colorful and flavorful roasted lamb in Montpulicano D´ Abruzzi Red Wine ... The recipe is steeped profoundly in the culture of this region, and we have enjoyed this version of roast lamb since time memorial.

For those, who do not wish to employ a shot glass ( tiny little glass, for a Cordial, of white or red wine in their marinade ), this is very personal selection, however, our family has been enjoying our "Viticulture" and the Shepherd´s historical profound Pasture culture when in Italia particularly due to product availability, for many many years, way before I was born and The Vet was born on both sides of the blue pond.

@ Addie: I appreciate your feedback, even though our culinary philosophies, sometimes can differ, none the less, we each have our own ethnicity and food culture that we each as individuals follow. Thanks for your feedback.

@ CharlieD.: Thanks much for your feedback. How do you prepare your roast lamb ?

As you know, each blogger - writer presents their views, and sometimes, go off topic, normally positive, and others, can present challenges to the original beginner of a thread ... However, none the less, this recipe has been tried and true and it makes a succulent, fragrantly incredible and aromatic traditional Roast Lamb. My Rumanian Receptionist and Secretary prepared this Roast Lamb for her Easter Holidays, and cannot stop raving about how delectable and scrumptuous it had been ...

@ Bolas: As always, thanks so much for sharing your Photos and anecdotes of enormous interest and humor. Your photos are always wonderful.
*** I had got married extremely young, due to an unexpected pregnancy, of my older daughter Naia, and 9 months later, the 2nd Nathalia. I had to re-engineer my entire life, as I had to attend University during the evenings and of course it took longer, than if I had gone during the day. It was trying, none the less, I had Mom Eva, and Sonia, our wonderful Brazilian Nanny. The Vet and I are enjoying The Mediterranean and when we decided to relocate, for better professional oppty on my part, my fave epicurism and love of these countries we share, as we have travelled through Greece, Italia, France, Portugal and Spain, uncountable times and speaking of Spain, the sad, and the worst aspects of the crisis with 24% unemployment --- does not make for a positive happy population !

Still and all, We have not been sorry for this relocation and the one which we shall embark on eventually to Puglia.

Take care.

Thanks for all the feedback, input and appreciate all your points of view.

Kindest,
Margi. Cintrano.
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Old 05-02-2012, 05:38 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skittle68 View Post
You need to simmer for about 30 min, uncovered if you really want most of the alcohol to cook off. Yes, the boiling point is lower than water, but it does still take time for it to evaporate. The idea that there is no way anything cooked can have alcohol in it is a myth.

(it drives me crazy when people say that, so just wanted to throw that out there ;)

Here is a table from the USDA showing the amount of alcohol left in a dish after each listed cooking method and time.

Table from USDA Showing Percent of Alcohol Retained After Cooking
Preparation Method Percent of Alcohol Retained
alcohol added to boiling liquid & removed from heat 85%
alcohol flamed 75%
no heat, stored overnight 70%
baked, 25 minutes, alcohol not stirred into mixture 45%
baked/simmered, alcohol stirred into mixture:
15 minutes 40%
30 minutes 35%
1 hour 25%
1.5 hours 20%
2 hours 10%
2.5 hours 5%
So now you know why when I ordered the shrimp scampi in a restaurant, I spit it out with the first bite. They added the alcohol at the last minute.

Yet I have had pasta gravy that has been cooking for several hours and thought it was delicious. And I never order freshly made pasta sauce. I have lived and learned. I feel pretty safe ordering Alfredo Fettuccine.
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Old 05-02-2012, 06:03 AM   #36
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Margi, I have made only one roast of lamb leg in my life. The major seasoning was the rosemary. It was so tender and juicy. Lots of flavor. Would love to make it again, but alas, the family is just not interested.
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Old 05-02-2012, 06:12 AM   #37
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@ Bolas,

Thanks so much for sharing your Dvd ... The seashore looks delightful in this region. Perhaps next year, we shall make a trip to Dubrovnik, and a Croatian Island or two ...

This year, is difficult as we are finishing the Library and the Guest Bedroom at the Condo, and then, My Mom. I am going to research a quick flight over to see her and stay with my older daughter and then a quick return flight. The Vet is going to hold The Fort here.

Thanks again for sharing your photos. I have to get my Photo Bucket together and the Photos I have of recipes, as I have alot of difficulty. I am techi as a peanut !
Margi.
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Old 05-02-2012, 01:17 PM   #38
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@ Margi, as far as lamb preparation. I do very similar to what you describe. Not as much herbs though. Growing up we had none, or almost none, even black pepper was hard to find. So I go heavier on salt, cayenne pepper and garlic and light on herbs.
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Old 05-02-2012, 01:21 PM   #39
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Charlie D.,

Thanks for your feedback. Yes, it is quite understandable, local product availability. Do you make slits and place the garlic slithers inside the slits ?
Sounds very good too.

Best Regards.
Margi.
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Old 05-02-2012, 01:23 PM   #40
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@ Addie,

Too bad on the roast lamb. It is delectable.

New England Roast Beef is good too.

Thanks for contributing.

Margi.
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