"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Lamb
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-02-2012, 01:30 PM   #41
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,399
I do not know about other partsof the States, but here in Minnesota lamb is Not popular, to say the least (or is it list?). NOt sure why. I just love lamb.
__________________

__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2012, 01:51 PM   #42
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,399
Quote:
Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
... Do you make slits and place the garlic slithers inside the slits ?
....
Depends on how much time I have. More often than not I just crush garlic really finely mixh with salt and pepper and rub all over.
__________________

__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2012, 01:55 PM   #43
Sous Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 985
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD
I do not know about other partsof the States, but here in Minnesota lamb is Not popular, to say the least (or is it list?). NOt sure why. I just love lamb.
My bf has never tried lamb, and if I hadn't lived in Cali for a couple years I probably wouldn't have ever tried it myself. I love lamb too, and plan to make it for the bf some time. We are moving soon however, and need to use up the meat already in the freezer. No idea why lamb isn't popular in MN. Maybe because there aren't many lamb hotdish recipes? Lol
__________________
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2012, 02:06 PM   #44
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,414
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
I do not know about other partsof the States, but here in Minnesota lamb is Not popular, to say the least (or is it list?). NOt sure why. I just love lamb.
I love it, too. I think it would be more popular if it were more widely available. The big grocery stores here are boring and only carry a limited selection of meats, with the majority of it being beef, pork, and chicken. Since that's what's available, that's what people eat.

I buy a half lamb every fall from a farm over in Wisconsin. I know there are places here in Minnesota that sell it also, but I've been buying from this guy for about 6 years now.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2012, 02:08 PM   #45
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,059
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
I do not know about other parts of the States, but here in Minnesota lamb is Not popular, to say the least (or is it list?). NOt sure why. I just love lamb.
MN is mostly a farming state. And being so far north, beef is the preferred meat. Folks think Texas when it comes to beef. They forget hat there are more cattle ranches in the far north than Texas. And they raise Black Angus. Hereford cattle have a different type of feed to graze on. There is not much grass in Texas cattle land. Go to MN and other states in the northern part of the country and the feed changes to grass.

Also cattle farmers are not fond of sheep farmers. The sheep tear the grass out of the land, cattle just chew on the top of it. The majority of our lamb meat is imported from NZ and Australia. But we are slowly learning how great lamb can be. BTW, I make a mean lamb stew with barley.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2012, 02:37 PM   #46
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,414
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
MN is mostly a farming state. And being so far north, beef is the preferred meat. Folks think Texas when it comes to beef. They forget hat there are more cattle ranches in the far north than Texas. And they raise Black Angus. Hereford cattle have a different type of feed to graze on. There is not much grass in Texas cattle land. Go to MN and other states in the northern part of the country and the feed changes to grass.

Also cattle farmers are not fond of sheep farmers. The sheep tear the grass out of the land, cattle just chew on the top of it. The majority of our lamb meat is imported from NZ and Australia. But we are slowly learning how great lamb can be. BTW, I make a mean lamb stew with barley.
Addie, I'm not sure where you are getting your statistics, but I don't believe we are even in the top ten states when it comes to beef production. Texas, Kansas, and Nebraska round out the top three, at least according to the USDA's web site. Texas is also number one in lamb.

Minnesota is number three when it comes to pork, though.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 03:18 PM   #47
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,399
About a month ago I bought half of a lamb, is 1 year old is still consider lamb?
Friend of mine sloghter 6. He was selling it. Kind of expensive, but it is nice and fresh. I wish I could do it more often, but dealing with kosher is pain in the neck (of a lamb, sorry) The rear end of the animal is not kosher and when I buy ine, I have to find some one to buy the rear end. That is always a problem.
__________________
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 03:45 PM   #48
Sous Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 985
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD
About a month ago I bought half of a lamb, is 1 year old is still consider lamb?
Friend of mine sloghter 6. He was selling it. Kind of expensive, but it is nice and fresh. I wish I could do it more often, but dealing with kosher is pain in the neck (of a lamb, sorry) The rear end of the animal is not kosher and when I buy ine, I have to find some one to buy the rear end. That is always a problem.
I would by the rear end! Lol. Live anywhere near St. Cloud? Ha ha
__________________
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 03:48 PM   #49
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,059
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
About a month ago I bought half of a lamb, is 1 year old is still consider lamb?
Friend of mine sloghter 6. He was selling it. Kind of expensive, but it is nice and fresh. I wish I could do it more often, but dealing with kosher is pain in the neck (of a lamb, sorry) The rear end of the animal is not kosher and when I buy ine, I have to find some one to buy the rear end. That is always a problem.
So are is there one rear leg and some ribs. I would think someone would jump at the chance to have a nice fresh leg of lamb, if they are not kosher.

CharlieD, I am curious. I understand the kosher kitchen. So do you have just one kitchen or two. One is strictly kosher for the holidays. Where would you cut up the lamb to give the rear end to someone else. You can't contaminate the kosher kitchen by bringing in the rear end of the lamb to cut it off. And would you use your kosher knives to cut off the rear end knowing that one side of the knife will be next to the non kosher meat? I am familiar with a lot of the Jewish practices and traditions. I have been in homes that are strictly kosher every day. They have only one kitchen. And I have seen other homes that have two kitchens. One that is strictly kosher for the high holidays.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-03-2012, 03:52 PM   #50
Sous Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 985
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie

So are is there one rear leg and some ribs. I would think someone would jump at the chance to have a nice fresh leg of lamb, if they are not kosher.

CharlieD, I am curious. I understand the kosher kitchen. So do you have just one kitchen or two. One is strictly kosher for the holidays. Where would you cut up the lamb to give the rear end to someone else. You can't contaminate the kosher kitchen by bringing in the rear end of the lamb to cut it off. And would you use your kosher knives to cut off the rear end knowing that one side of the knife will be next to the non kosher meat? I am familiar with a lot of the Jewish practices and traditions. I have been in homes that are strictly kosher every day. They have only one kitchen. And I have seen other homes that have two kitchens. One that is strictly kosher for the high holidays.
I would guess the lamb is already butchered and packaged
__________________

__________________
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
lamb, milk

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.