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Old 04-30-2010, 03:31 PM   #31
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Speaking of lamb (off topic sorta), are there two types of gyros? I ask this because there was a drive thru around here that sold delicious gyros. What was different was the gyro meat. Instead of being brownish and sliced off a big stump (like all i see today), this place marinated chunks of lamb until it turned white. To me...it tasted more authentic greek like. I really don't care for the gyros made from carved brown slices off a stump. I can't even to find a place that even knows what I'm talking about when I describe the gyro's this place used to sell. I miss their way of preparing the lamb for their delicious gyro's. I have not found ONE place around here who marinates their gyro meat until it's the color of chicken.

Are all gyro's made from lamb or could this marinated to white meat have been a beef gyro??? Anyways...anyone ever had a gyro made from marinated meat turned white?
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Old 04-30-2010, 03:42 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by Caslon View Post
...this place marinated chunks of lamb until it turned white...
Then, I assume they grilled the chunks.

That's more of a shish kebab sandwich than a gyro. The vertically rotisserie roasted Greek meatloaf mixture that is sliced off the skewer is the stuff gyros are made of.
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Old 04-30-2010, 05:14 PM   #33
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Agree with Andy - the "chunks of lamb" sandwich you had wasn't a gyro. It was simply a sandwich made with cooked marinated chunks of lamb.
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Old 04-30-2010, 07:04 PM   #34
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Smile Info on ecoli

When cattle are grass fed, their digestive systems automatically prevent the growth of ecoli bacteria. The rush to have the animals put on weight quickly is why the mega farms feed grain. And so--here comes more ecoli.
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Old 04-30-2010, 08:34 PM   #35
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What happened 'very recently' to change that?
I picked up a family pack of lamb chops on sale at a price I couldn't refuse. Boy was I sad to see them go.

Here's what I did with them:
Garlic & Rosemary Lamb Chops
Broiled Lamb Chops
Broiled Lamb Chops with a Madeira Reduction
Lamb Chops & Bacon Macín'Cheese

Makes me almost willing to pay full price for some more. I probably would if I knew they would be as good.
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Old 05-01-2010, 04:48 AM   #36
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By the way, I did talk to my lamb expert yesterday, asked him why lamb seems so much milder than I remember eating when I was younger. (Do NOT ask me why I didn't think to ask him before I started this line! Dumb!) His answer went along lines I read here: first of all "we get the lambs to the market much earlier than in previous decades; what you ate when you were younger were much older animals." Do you mean they were closer to mutton than lamb? "Exactly." "... and now they are finished with grain, which also makes for a milder flavor, although they eat grass for most of their lives." "Some of the lamb we sell here is local, some New Zealand, you don't know when you buy it."

OK, there, from the farmer's mouth. His family decided to stop farming lambs, this is his first year lamb-free. I asked if he missed them, yes, he replied. But I'm sure he doesn't miss lambing season (i.e., staying up 24 hours a day helping to deliver difficult cases) and he replied that moving them to fresh pastures all summer wasn't fun, either. It was all more work than anyone wanted to continue with, especially since it wasn't enough for a living, they all had to have "day jobs" as well, putting in regular work weeks on top of taking care of the farm.
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Old 05-01-2010, 04:53 AM   #37
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Where I've eaten, the grilled chunks of meat (usually on a skewer) served with a piece of pita is souvlaki. Regular gyros are the slices of meat (sometimes a pressed combination of lamb and beef, sometimes sliced off a rotisserie) served on pita.
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Old 05-01-2010, 06:37 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by normatassler View Post
When cattle are grass fed, their digestive systems automatically prevent the growth of ecoli bacteria. The rush to have the animals put on weight quickly is why the mega farms feed grain. And so--here comes more ecoli.
I'm afraid that's not true. There's no difference in E. coli levels between grain-fed & grass-fed cattle. And frankly, even if there was, it makes no difference whatsoever. The problems with E. coli (which is naturally present in the systems of all mammals, including humans) come when the animal enters the slaughter facility & is improperly handled, thus allowing the E. coli naturally present in the fecal matter to come in contact with the meat.
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Old 05-01-2010, 01:17 PM   #39
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Smile

Sorry to disagree. I wish I had the citation on hand; however, the information came from studies performed by a research organization. It seems that grain feeding encourages the growth of ecoli in the digestive system. It is not the only cause.
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Old 05-01-2010, 01:43 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caslon View Post
Speaking of lamb (off topic sorta), are there two types of gyros? I ask this because there was a drive thru around here that sold delicious gyros. What was different was the gyro meat. Instead of being brownish and sliced off a big stump (like all i see today), this place marinated chunks of lamb until it turned white. To me...it tasted more authentic greek like. I really don't care for the gyros made from carved brown slices off a stump. I can't even to find a place that even knows what I'm talking about when I describe the gyro's this place used to sell. I miss their way of preparing the lamb for their delicious gyro's. I have not found ONE place around here who marinates their gyro meat until it's the color of chicken.

Are all gyro's made from lamb or could this marinated to white meat have been a beef gyro??? Anyways...anyone ever had a gyro made from marinated meat turned white?
caslon, what you had was called souvlaki. i, too, prefer it over a gyro.

souvlaki is a greek dish that most people know as kebabs (the middle eastern/turkish word for it), of grilled marinated meat chunks: either beef, pork or lamb. not so much pork in muslim countries, lol.

technically, you had souvlaki on a pita, possibly with tsatsiki sauce, and salad (for lack of a better term).

also, my guess is that you had a mix of lamb and beef, or just lamb flavored beef. if it were all lamb, the type of cuts used for souvlaki would most likely be reddish inside after grilling, not white.

so they might haved reserved lamb fat from a larger roast, then mixed it into the marinade for beef chunks to flavour them.

hth.
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