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Old 10-22-2006, 07:13 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by attie
"I mean ... really! Who on earth came up with the mint jelly idea? Whose demented idea of brilliant was that?!"
Opps! I must be the only one who likes mint with Lamb, I agree that Rosemary is a must though.
Sorry Attie, not meant personally! To each his own and all of that.

Besides, if I can find her again (oohhh ISHbelll!), Ishbel's proposing that it's not mint per se, just that nasty jelly some of us were subjected to.

Oh, you like that mint jelly you say?! Sorry ...
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Old 10-22-2006, 07:54 AM   #12
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Sorry Ishbel, mint sauce on lamb might be traditional in Britain but personally I reckon it's an abomination.

Anyway, here's what I'd do with a boneless leg of lamb


Cut into cubes, marinade in lemon juice, olive oil, garlic and rosemary for several hours (even overnight) and then thread onto kebab skewers and cook over charcoal.

Use it for my Turkish lamb recipe (posted under the lamb section of the meat forum).

Or I'd do a butterflied leg of lamb to a recipe along these lines:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/da...dle_5219.shtml
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Old 10-22-2006, 08:08 AM   #13
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"Oh, you like that mint jelly you say?! Sorry"
LOL Aryton, no offense taken. Yep! I must say that a homemade mint dressing is much nicer but when you can't get fresh mint [because you forgot to get the mint as I normally do] and there's a bottle of jelly in the fridge --- well --- beggars can't be choosers.

Wholy smokes Snoop Puss, I'm getting barrelled from all corners of the globe
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Old 10-22-2006, 08:18 AM   #14
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I wonder if mint jelly's total reason for existence is lamb?

Has anyone ever had a peanut butter sandwich with mint jelly, for instance? Or a mint jelly omelette?

Is there a Mint Jelly Council, created to improve the P.R. of this much-maligned product?
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Old 10-22-2006, 10:21 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayrton
I wonder if mint jelly's total reason for existence is lamb?

Has anyone ever had a peanut butter sandwich with mint jelly, for instance? Or a mint jelly omelette?

Is there a Mint Jelly Council, created to improve the P.R. of this much-maligned product?

You clearly have not been to www.mintjelly.com. the MJ police would like to talk to you.
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Old 10-22-2006, 10:28 AM   #16
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Ayrton - I can't find my recipe - but here's Daisy's - which is very similar to mine.., although I would be a bit more sparing re the vinegar! The thing about mint jelly that puts me off is that weird day-glo GREEN colour, and it's far too sweet...

Daisy's recipe (cut and pasted from another thread)
Mint Sauce [the classic sauce to serve with roast lamb]
2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint
1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon boiling water
1/2 cup vinegar

Wash and dry the mint, remove stalks, chop finely and add sugar. Pour in the boiling water. Add vinegar and stir well. Serve with roast lamb. [Note: if you combine the leaves and sugar first, it will make the leaves easier to chop, so they don't cling to the cutters or knife.]
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Old 10-22-2006, 10:37 AM   #17
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Um, I like mint jelly...I do, really. I even prefer it to mint sauce, which is delicious. I like a spoon ful of mint jelly in my lamb gravy, or with cold lamb, or on sandwiches.

BUT, if I had a boneless leg the thing I would be most likely to do is stuff it with prunes and apricots...thinking Morrocan, and serve on a bed of couscous. I would probably (very untraditionally add red wine to the dish I was cooking the lamb in,) with garlic and serve with lots of fresh herbs. Personally I would put dried fruits in the cous cous too, but I know some people dont love it as much as I do, so lots of fresh corriander, cucumber and tomatos would be second choice. I would serve with a fresh crunchy salad of chicory with evoo.
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Old 10-22-2006, 10:48 AM   #18
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Wow! Lamb is one of those foods people get passionate with. And as for the mint, it is such a powerful flavor that I find either that people love it or hate it. My dear Grandmother once tried to get me to eat a York Peppermint Pattie. She always had butter mints around the house and when I wouldn't eat them, said it was all in my head.

Well, to make a long story short, we were going on one of the famous "rides" in the station wagon to look for deer. She gave me the candy, which looked like a chocolate cookie to me, I bit it and lost my breakfast all over the back seat. She never tried to trick me with mints again. And I swear, the reaction was totally involuntary.

We were all born with differing taste buds. I love sardines, super sharp cheddar, and liverwurst. Even head cheese goes down well. Go figure.

Seeeeeeeya; Goodweed if the North.
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Old 10-22-2006, 10:51 AM   #19
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Oh! This is SO Easy and Impressive.

This is one of my "old stand-by's" -- with good reason. It's incredibly easy to make, and everyone always comes back for seconds. You can do it on your grill, but its just as good roasted in the oven. If its not browned enough to suit you, you can run it under the broiler at the end for effect. But please, don't cook it to over 135 degrees. 10 minutes of "sitting" will bring it up to 154. I know so well exactly what it does, because I made this a couple of weeks ago for a party I did in the West Village. Bit rave reviews. Try it!

Butterflied Leg of Lamb à la Provençal

makes 8 servings

1 Leg of Lamb, trimmed and boned (approximately 5 pounds trimmed weight)
(Be sure to ask your butcher to remove the fell.)

Marinade:
1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
1 tablespoon fresh rosemary leaves
1 tablespoon fresh marjoram leaves
3 cloves garlic
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 lemon, juice and zest

1. Coarsely chop leaves and garlic. Add lemon zest and mix with oil and juice of the lemon. Rub lamb well, all over. Wrap in plastic, and marinate at least 1 hour. (You can let it sit up to three hours in the refrigerator.)
2. Grill over rosy red coals, or an electric range top grill, for 45 minutes (to 130 degrees F. internal). Or, you may roast it in the oven--375 degrees F. for 20 to 25 minutes, then slide under the broiler 2 minutes (to 125 degrees F. internal) to achieve that crusty grilled look.
3. Let sit at least 10 minutes before carving.

Wine Tip: Although Bordeaux-style wines traditionally pair with lamb, and are suggested on many food-and-wine pairing charts, I think the garlic and the grilling indicate a more robust wine. A Provençal-style syrah-based red or a chewy Zinfandel (such as Shenandoah) from California are more worthy companions to this flavorful roast.
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Old 10-22-2006, 10:54 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayrton
I wonder if mint jelly's total reason for existence is lamb?

Has anyone ever had a peanut butter sandwich with mint jelly, for instance? Or a mint jelly omelette?

Is there a Mint Jelly Council, created to improve the P.R. of this much-maligned product?
If that's the case, then mint jelly has NO reason for being. I can't stand it! especially with lamb! For years, when I was a kid, everytime anyone served lamb, they served that awful green stuff. It made me dislike even the idea of lanb.

Nowadays, I can stand mint -- FRESH mint -- with lamb, but its NOT my favorite! Im big on the garlic and rosemary kind of lamb.. In fact, I have three recipes for lamb in my cookbook, and NONE of them get even CLOSE to anything mint!
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