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Old 11-23-2011, 08:03 AM   #11
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I'm sure that some folks have tried it, thinking it was something else. There used to be a chain here called Lum's. They created a menu item called "Wienerwald Chicken". I don't think it was a coincidence that the local pigeon population started to decline.

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Old 11-23-2011, 02:36 PM   #12
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I've had pigeons a lot as a child. My grandma used to make them. Remeber liking it a lot, but then I liked everything she made.
That was a long time ago.
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Old 11-23-2011, 07:37 PM   #13
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If you like them enough to pay $18 per/pound for them, here's some:

Exotic Meats USA - Squab
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Old 11-23-2011, 07:43 PM   #14
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I'm sure that some folks have tried it, thinking it was something else. There used to be a chain here called Lum's. They created a menu item called "Wienerwald Chicken". I don't think it was a coincidence that the local pigeon population started to decline.

Craig
The food at Lum's was lousy but the giant frosted schooners of beer made up for it.
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Old 12-23-2011, 02:48 PM   #15
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Back around 1960 or therabouts I had a good friend who raised domestic homing pigeons. He would let them fly in the city of Hackensack and they would bring in the city pigeons. I remember delivering a garbage can full of them to a nearby Chinese restaurant. Sal.
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Old 12-23-2011, 02:56 PM   #16
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Pigeons wouldn't stand a chance in my neighborhood. There are lots of Hawks and Owls around my house. I love em. They eat snakes, mice and any critter dumb enough to come out in the open within their sight.

I was walking my teacup chihuahua, Meko one evening and a hawk made a run for it. I scared it off by waving my arms.

Little Meko peed herself, but she did that for anything that happened near her.
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Old 12-24-2011, 02:10 AM   #17
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Timothy we have a nesting pair of Peregrine Falcons (duck hawks) that have raised one chick for the last 7 yrs. They are a legally protected bird with only about 1400 in the country. They nest in the same spot every year and have around the clock protection against egg collectors.
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Old 12-24-2011, 12:53 PM   #18
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Timothy we have a nesting pair of Peregrine Falcons (duck hawks) that have raised one chick for the last 7 yrs. They are a legally protected bird with only about 1400 in the country. They nest in the same spot every year and have around the clock protection against egg collectors.
That is so cool, Bolas. I've dreamed of having a trained Falcon. I had a friend who owned one in Berlin, Germany, and watching it hunt was truly fascinating and humbling. That bird would leap into the sky, go immediately to a height that made it look like a speck in the sky, and then almost immediately, dive-bomb a rabbit. It never took longer than 5 minutes to bring one back. Incredible how much weight they can take off and fly with.
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Old 12-24-2011, 10:21 PM   #19
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Funny, in our neck of the woods there seem to be plenty of both hawks and pigeons. maybe the balance is good.

We were on the road in a trailer, out to discover America, for three years, and once camped next to a falconer. He was very interesting. He did training sessions with the bird, and we really enjoyed talking to and watching him.

yes, I have eaten squab/pigeon, and it was quite tasty. In Hong Kong. But really, we have a "wild" bird place here where you can buy wild birds of most sorts (I don't think the above). After trying the mallard, the turkey, and the pheasant I realized why man domesticated birds. Very lean. Very, very lean. Very tough. Very flavorful, but needed to be larded, and once I got that down, I realized that braised would be better than roasted, and easier. But, like I said, very tasty.
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Old 12-24-2011, 10:29 PM   #20
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Funny, in our neck of the woods there seem to be plenty of both hawks and pigeons. maybe the balance is good.

We were on the road in a trailer, out to discover America, for three years, and once camped next to a falconer. He was very interesting. He did training sessions with the bird, and we really enjoyed talking to and watching him.

yes, I have eaten squab/pigeon, and it was quite tasty. In Hong Kong. But really, we have a "wild" bird place here where you can buy wild birds of most sorts (I don't think the above). After trying the mallard, the turkey, and the pheasant I realized why man domesticated birds. Very lean. Very, very lean. Very tough. Very flavorful, but needed to be larded, and once I got that down, I realized that braised would be better than roasted, and easier. But, like I said, very tasty.
I've only eaten two types of wild birds; "chucker", which is what people in Nevada call Prarie Hens, but are actually a Chucker Partridge. Also, Dove.

The Chucker tasted exactly like gamey chicken, and the Dove breasts were the best of the two. They were roasted with a liberal coating of black pepper and were just awesome!
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