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Old 02-11-2012, 05:13 PM   #1
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Braised Rabbit

This is more a sort of recipe, nothing exact. The other thing, why is it that most of the websites that deal with cooking consider things like rabbit wild game. The one I am cooking today is a domestic rabbit. Lovers of wild game would generally consider it too bland in flavor. I have no access to a hunting lease [south Texas, no public hunting, so you must lease] Anyway it will be very good.

I have raised some herbs in planters outside, today it is about 60 degrees out and tomorrow it will be in the 80s. So...rabbit is washed and laid in a pan on its side, sweet onion rings are laid on top, whole sprigs of lemon basil over that, thick smoked bacon strips on that, seasoning is whatever I like, fresh cut sprigs of rosemary are stuffed in the ribcage and between the thighs. A cup or two of water in the pan. Spray a little butter flavored pam or whatever on top. I would use olive oil but there is none in the house, so I must make do. So, heat up the oven, about 400 when preheated, stick in the bunny, then after about 20 minutes turn it down to about 325 and leave it to become delicious. Rabbit is so low in fat, the bacon is almost a necessity to keep it moistish.

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Old 02-11-2012, 10:09 PM   #2
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love rabbit. did a rabbit ragout over pasta last week.
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Old 02-11-2012, 11:18 PM   #3
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Don't feel like going upstairs to my extensive cookbook collection, but I liked to make husepfeffer(?), also, I believe, known as jugged hare. haven't cooked a rabbit in years. My introduction to rabbit was my best friend's mom used to make a rabbit stewed in wine. She was French, and it was delicious. Years later I was in military training in Mississippi, and went through the chow hall line and had fried chicken. I ate it, it was good, but it was obviously rabbit. I realized most of my fellow airmen trainees would have a fit if they knew enough about it to see it wasn't chicken parts, I shut my mouth (and, yes, it was quite good!).
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Old 02-11-2012, 11:26 PM   #4
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I make my rabbit that way too. Toss it in flour, salt and pepper, saute in oil, throw on a chopped onion and add some Chardonnay, sauterne, sherry or whatever, then reduce heat, cover and braise for about 45 minutes (or braise in oven).

I like rabbit because I like dark meat. What could be better than 4 thighs per?
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Old 02-12-2012, 12:38 AM   #5
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and had fried chicken. I ate it, it was good, but it was obviously rabbit.

Rabbit can substitute for chicken in almost any recipe. I am not saying it tastes just like chicken, only that they are interchangeable.

Rabbit also makes a great country style pate, btw.

why is it that most of the websites that deal with cooking consider things like rabbit wild game.

One reason, Pmeheron, is that many---perhaps most---rabbit recipes originated in Europe, where it is wild game. Has to do with a difference in percieved ownership.

Here in the US it has been illegal to sell wild game for just about a century. It's controlled because game belongs to the people as a whole. In Europe (including the UK), game belongs to the landowner, and it is harvested and sold in the marketplaces.

It's not just rabbits, of course. Any "game" legally sold in America---be it rabbit, venison, gamebirds, what-have-you---is farm raised.
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Old 02-12-2012, 03:48 AM   #6
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pm, you ate a pet bunny? lol.

reminds me of michael moore's "pets or meat".
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Old 02-12-2012, 06:28 AM   #7
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Skillet-Fried Rabbit
2 young rabbits, dressed out and rinsed clean
2 egg yokes, beaten
3 c. milk
1 1/2 c. flour
1 tsp. salt
1/2 c. shortening
Pat the rabbits dry.
With a large, heavy knife trim the ends of the front and hind legs. Discard.
Cut off the front and hind legs at the joints.
Cut the hind legs into 2 pieces at the joint
Cut the body into 3 equal sections.
Cut the rib section in half through the breast and back bones and then cut each half in half.

Whisk together the egg yolks and 1 cup of milk;
gradually add in 1 cup of the flour;
add the salt; beat until smooth.
Heat the shortening in a deep cast-iron skillet
Dip rabbit pieces into the batter and fry in hot fat until brown, or about 15 minutes. Reduce the heat and continue cooking until tender, about 30 to 40 minutes, turning frequently.

To make gravy add the remaining flour to fat in pan, gradually add the remaining milk and stirring constantly, heat to boiling.
Lower heat and season with salt and pepper to taste.
Serve over the rabbit pieces and whatever taters you're having
and season to taste with salt and black pepper. Pour over the pieces of rabbit.









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Old 02-12-2012, 11:47 AM   #8
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Shhhhh! Be vewy quiet, I'm hunting wabbits!
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Old 02-12-2012, 12:04 PM   #9
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Tuscany Rabbit Stew

Good Afternoon,

Rabbit is common fare in Tuscany as well as in France and in the landlocked parts of Spain. Coniglio alla Cacciatora, Rabbit is prepared in Tuscany as follows:

2.5 pounds or 3 pounds of rabbit
salt and freshly ground pepper
1 tblsp olive oil extra virgin
2 tblsps rosemary sprigs
1/2 cup white wine
3/4 cup beef or chicken broth
2 tsp butter
1 tsp all purpose flour
4 cloves garlic
1 tomato

The rabbit is browned ( as you can see in the Poster´s photos ) and then, the broth and wine and spices are created with the pan juices.

In Spain, it is sauteéd in olive oil with garlic and called Conejo al Ajo, browned and sauteéd with garlic minced and white wine and olive oil.

Very common here during the autumn.

Nice form of posting with the photos, well done job.

Margi Cintrano.
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Old 02-12-2012, 12:39 PM   #10
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Kinda pan fried/browned....then cooked in gravy!

Pass the biscuits!~~~
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Braised Rabbit This is more a sort of recipe, nothing exact. The other thing, why is it that most of the websites that deal with cooking consider things like rabbit wild game. The one I am cooking today is a domestic rabbit. Lovers of wild game would generally consider it too bland in flavor. I have no access to a hunting lease [south Texas, no public hunting, so you must lease] Anyway it will be very good. I have raised some herbs in planters outside, today it is about 60 degrees out and tomorrow it will be in the 80s. So...rabbit is washed and laid in a pan on its side, sweet onion rings are laid on top, whole sprigs of lemon basil over that, thick smoked bacon strips on that, seasoning is whatever I like, fresh cut sprigs of rosemary are stuffed in the ribcage and between the thighs. A cup or two of water in the pan. Spray a little butter flavored pam or whatever on top. I would use olive oil but there is none in the house, so I must make do. So, heat up the oven, about 400 when preheated, stick in the bunny, then after about 20 minutes turn it down to about 325 and leave it to become delicious. Rabbit is so low in fat, the bacon is almost a necessity to keep it moistish. 3 stars 1 reviews
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