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Old 05-05-2012, 03:03 PM   #11
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Tax Lady,

Cointreau is another type of flavor profile even though it is in orange family too HOWEVER, I would not use it with my roast ducklings ! Too thin, and would not create such a stunner divine sauce as GRAN MARNIER ...

A Cordial is a type of licor, an after dinner type.

However, are you talking about Cordon ? ( a French word, as in Cordon Bleu, a culinary institute ) ---

JAUME = James in Catalan language from Catalonia

Are you referring to CAVA = a white sparkling wine from Sant Sadurní Dī Anoia, Barcelona ?

I am uncertain what you mean. Please clarify.

We shall be off for restaurant to meet friends shortly and it is 21.00 hrs. here already.

Happy 5th May.

Grazie, Ciao.
Margi
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Old 05-05-2012, 03:14 PM   #12
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Thank you for the clarification on the Cointreau.

Grand Marnier comes in two (or possibly more) qualities. The cordon rouge (red ribbon - there is a red ribbon on the bottle), which is the higher quality, original version and a cheaper, lesser quality version with a yellow ribbon on the bottle. The cordon jaune (yellow ribbon) is only available in some European countries. It is used more for cooking and some cocktails than for sipping.
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Old 05-05-2012, 04:38 PM   #13
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Grand Marnier is gosh awful sweet. I'd rather use some Chiver's thinned down with Cointreau; and mix some Lepanto with Cointreau and red wine on the rocks for a beverage while cooking the duck.
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Old 05-05-2012, 04:48 PM   #14
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Both Grand Marnier and Cointreau are sweeter tasting diluted, even just on the rocks.
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Old 05-05-2012, 05:05 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Both Grand Marnier and Cointreau are sweeter tasting diluted, even just on the rocks.
I go by the amount sugary crust that can accumulate near the bottle stopper and prefer the taste of Cointreau to that of Grand Marnier and care not at all for Marie Brizard nor Bols. When in Italy, I once bought a sealed bottle of Bols creme de cacao that had a furry fly in it .
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Old 05-06-2012, 05:52 AM   #16
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Tax lady: Yes, Red Ribbon Packaging on Bottle Neck

Good Morning,

Saturday night, while over at our Mexican friendīs Restaurant, I had checked the Grand Marnier Bottles, and yes, red ribbon packaging on bottleneck.

Then, when we had arrived home, we checked the Liquor Cabinet, and yes, again Red Ribbon Packaging on the bottle neck.

Cordon = in French is string
Cordón = in Spanish is ties or rope

So, this is why I had not completely caught your drift !

Bow = Lazo in Spanish and Farfalle in Italian ( think Pasta shapes ! )

Ribbon = in Spanish is Cinta ...

*** I have never seen a Yellow Ribboned Gran Marnier, however, France is our northern neighbor ... maybe that is export outside EU countries only or for cooking ---

Thanks for feedback and input.
Have nice wkend.
Margi.
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Old 05-06-2012, 05:55 AM   #17
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Bill,

Considering all the Savoury flavours in this dish, 3 tablespoons of Gran Marnier do not create a sweetness at all. As a matter of fact, there is only a faint hint of the " orange fragrance " which make the dish so lovely.

We would not have cordials of Gran Marnier while preparing duckling ! We would however, have a chilled Prosecco perhaps ...

Thank you for your feedback.
Have nice wkend.
M.C.
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Old 05-06-2012, 06:48 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
Bill,

Considering all the Savoury flavours in this dish, 3 tablespoons of Gran Marnier do not create a sweetness at all. As a matter of fact, there is only a faint hint of the " orange fragrance " which make the dish so lovely.

We would not have cordials of Gran Marnier while preparing duckling ! We would however, have a chilled Prosecco perhaps ...

Thank you for your feedback.
Have nice wkend.
M.C.
The blend of red wine, Lepanto, and Cointreau that I mentioned hardly qualifies as being a cordial. 1/4 US cup = 4 tablespoons of Grand Marnier.
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Old 05-06-2012, 10:06 AM   #19
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Good Afternoon,

I am a bit unclear ... Firstly, you have stated; that the recipe is good looking and sounds delicous ...

Then, on later feedback posts, you have got into pheasant, and then, moved on to Cointreau and that Gran Marnier can be too sweet ...

Considering the 3 tblps. and the cinammon, anise etcetra, all the savoury ingredients, I do not consider it sweet. I do not have much of a sweet tooth, and dislike heavily thick sugary flavors, for example: maple or sugary candied items.

This is what you originally stated, looks fab and tastes even better. It is fragrant and the whole house, has that spiced yet lightly orange hint of perfume.

Lepanto + Cointreau is not a cordial ---

Cointreau alone yes.

Have nice day. You would enjoy I am sure, with duck or even with pheasant or chicken ...

Have nice Sunday too.
M.C.
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Old 05-06-2012, 10:36 PM   #20
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@ Margi, sounds like a wonderful recipe, the only question I have is would it work with skinless duck? Thank you.
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