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Old 10-13-2007, 09:54 AM   #1
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Grouse Recipes?

My DH is going to WI grouse hunting, anyone have some recipes to share?
Many thanks!

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Old 10-13-2007, 02:59 PM   #2
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In my opinion ruffed grouse is one of the tastiest game birds. It's generally a lost moister than most pheasant and can be prepared like roast chicken. I'd advise plucking rather than skinning. Hope DH can use lead instead of steel shot.
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Old 10-13-2007, 03:31 PM   #3
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I'm with bill about it being tasty and can be roasted like a chicken (my step-dad did some stuffed with long grain and wild rice, onions, mushrooms, pecans and dried apricots) once ... sorry I don't have the recipe.

For some ideas on all of the different ways you can use grouse you might check out some of these recipes for some ideas.
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Old 10-13-2007, 06:14 PM   #4
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My Dad used to bring home ruffed grouse all of the time. It is much like a cornish-game hen, but with a gamier flavor, depending on what the bird has been eating. The areas just under the wings can be very strong.

Good herbs to use with grouse include, but are not limited to - sage, tyme, garlic, onion, coriander. I don't think cumin is complimentary to grouse.

Also, beware the shot. LIttle balls of lead or steel shot. They can break teeth and are sometimes found hidden in the meat if the shooter wasn't accurate enough.

A great way to prepare these little birds is to wrap in bacon and roast with mushrooms and cooked rice. Searve one bird per person.

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Old 10-13-2007, 07:11 PM   #5
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I definitely advise you to find yourself a copy of the L. L. Bean Game and Fish Cookbook. Husband got me a copy from our local library book sale & I've had a lot of fun reading it - even though we're not hunters.

It contains wonderful instructions & recipes on treating game birds - including grouse - & including how to deal with grouse that have been dining on pine & hemlock, which I understand can be a serious consideration during certain times of the year.
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Old 10-14-2007, 10:05 AM   #6
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We have a place near here that sells wild birds. One thing I learned is that you have to buy a pound of thick-sliced bacon and just cover the bird with it. We're used to birds that waddle around and do nothing until they die. Wild birds are lean and tough. Anyway, I put several strips of bacon across the bird (I've not done grouse, but have done wild turkey (which makes to realize why our forefathers domesticated the darned thing), several kinds of duck, and pheasant. I personally, over the years, have decided that braising is the best method for wild birds. In a baking dish, with an onion, several cloves of garlic. If you want to make it a one-dish-meal, a few potatoes and carrots. Then a half cup of red wine, and a half cup of chicken stock. Then low and slow for a couple of hours. Towards the end, throw in some mushrooms.
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Old 10-14-2007, 02:47 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire View Post
We have a place near here that sells wild birds. One thing I learned is that you have to buy a pound of thick-sliced bacon and just cover the bird with it. We're used to birds that waddle around and do nothing until they die. Wild birds are lean and tough. Anyway, I put several strips of bacon across the bird (I've not done grouse, but have done wild turkey (which makes to realize why our forefathers domesticated the darned thing), several kinds of duck, and pheasant. I personally, over the years, have decided that braising is the best method for wild birds. In a baking dish, with an onion, several cloves of garlic. If you want to make it a one-dish-meal, a few potatoes and carrots. Then a half cup of red wine, and a half cup of chicken stock. Then low and slow for a couple of hours. Towards the end, throw in some mushrooms.
Above is not necessarily true about grouse.
Hemorrhaging caused by bird-shot causes dark streaks which is a clue as to where be on the lookout for shot.
The LL Bean cookbook is quite good.

Wild rice used to be available in Northern Wisconsin at a considerable discount to the price elsewhere. Since it makes a dandy ingredient for bird stuffing, you might ask DH if he can buy a few pounds while he's there.
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Old 10-15-2007, 07:19 PM   #8
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When we were on the road, we could still find wild rice for very little, and I agree that it makes the best stuffing for wild birds. Out in the country of Wisconsin or Minnesota, we could find it in three grades. I always bought the middle grade (this has to do with how broken up the grains are). I did learn that wild rice takes longer to cook than "regular" rice. I do think it is the perfect stuffing for wild birds. I make up a cup of each (wild and regular long grain), both cooked in chicken broth, with chopped sauteed onions and herbs (sage and thyme being my favorites). Then stuff the birds (and, as I said, if they are wild, a strip or two of bacon over the top). Bake or braise, low and slow.
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