"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Wild Game
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-16-2008, 02:39 PM   #11
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: central Ohio
Posts: 3,131
This is not chilli but it gives you another option....

Venison Sausage Balls

Ingredients
1-1/2 pounds ground venison
1/2 cup dry bread crumbs
1 egg, beaten
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup mashed potatoes
1/2 teaspoon brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1/4 teaspoon allspice
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon cloves
1/8 teaspoon ginger
1/4 cup melted butter

Mix first 6 ingredients and spices in bowl. Shape in 1-inch balls. Brown in butter in skillet, turning frequently. Cook covered over low heat for 15 minutes. Garnish with parsley and lemon and orange slices.
__________________

__________________
"Many people have eaten my cooking & gone on to lead Normal lives."

deelady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2008, 03:47 PM   #12
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Commercial "farm raised" venison (Blackhawk, Broken Arrow Ranch, etc.) does not have the gamey flavor of wild game venison harvested by a hunter.

Venison is very low in fat - so you might need to add a little when you brown it up to make your chili. It doesn't have to be a lot - just enough to cover the bottom of your pot - 2-3 tablespoons of oil should do it.

You can use any chili recipe you want. I use the same one for venison as I do for beef.
__________________

__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2008, 11:45 PM   #13
Some Like it Hot
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Thank you Deelady! Sounds like a wonderful recipe. What else would you serve with the Venison sausage meatballs?

Michael, I'm curious about your statement that farm raised wild game not having a gamey flavor. Why is that? Maybe I just answered my own question... maybe because they are not truly wild game?
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2008, 12:07 AM   #14
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: central Ohio
Posts: 3,131
Truthfully....I Have No Idea!!!
__________________
"Many people have eaten my cooking & gone on to lead Normal lives."

deelady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2008, 05:26 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Quote:
Originally Posted by Some Like it Hot View Post
Michael, I'm curious about your statement that farm raised wild game not having a gamey flavor. Why is that? Maybe I just answered my own question... maybe because they are not truly wild game?
Yep - it's all about their diet. Farm raised game animals are fed supplemental feed (usually corn or corn-based) to fatten them up - while "wild" animals eat what they can find ... nuts, berries, bark, etc.

Same thing goes for farm raised pigs vs feral pigs, rabbits, squirrels, etc. There is also a difference in the taste of beef that is totally grass fed and finished on corn in a feedlot.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2008, 06:22 PM   #16
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Some Like it Hot View Post
Y
Constance, thanks so much for you insight. You definately sound like someone who has been around the block a few times with deer meat. I may have more questions if that is ok? (Know anything about elk sirloin????) LOL!
I'll be happy to help you any way I can. I've never cooked elk, but I've heard it's wonderful. All those critters, including moose and caribou as well, are considered venison and treated the same way.

We made roasts out of the deer sirloins, but I've tasted some that were cut into steaks, marinated in an herb vinaigrette and grilled like steaks, and they were outstanding. I think taste depends a lot on the individual animal...it's age, sex and diet. Most importantly, whether you do it hot and fast or low and slow, don't overcook the meat, or it will be dry.

By the way, Michael, our deer may as well be considered farm raised, as the fatten up on the farmers' corn and soybeans. Our grandson gut-shot a deer once, and he said there was corn all over the place. LOL!
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2008, 12:16 AM   #17
Some Like it Hot
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Michael in FtW - Thanks for the explanation. I'm somewhat dissapointed now knowing that it is not 'true' wild game. But then I'm not sure what I was expecting when I ordered the stuff. I guess it is not like a hunter can actually hunt the game and sell it on the web right?

Constance, I'm trying to expand my pallet by trying different things. I get so tired of cooking the same things over and over. Buffalo is really good, but as mentioned earlier in the thread, if you had not of told me it was buffalo, I would have never know the difference. I appreciate your willingness to help, looking forward to it actually!!

Oh!!! Michael!! Got another question for you! Maybe you or Constance knows the answer to this and I'm certain it has to do with the fact that it is farmed raised. But the buffalo strip and ribeye that I got was dissapointingly small. I guess when I think of buffalo, I think of those massive creatures roaming the plains. I assumed that a ribeye could very well be the size of my face. But when I got them, they seemed smaller than the beef ribeyes I order locally. Perhaps a trade off, less fat and more meat when it comes to the buffalo? I'm yappin, I'll hush now. :)
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2008, 08:14 PM   #18
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
As far as I know - it is against the law in every state for a hunter to sell wild game they harvest. They can donate game to organizations that feed the hoimeless, or to "food banks", or you can give meat to friends ... but there are usually some record keeping requirements (the meat might need to have a game tag) - and this also includes fish in some instances. There are limits on how much game you can possess at any given time ...

Buffalo (American Bison) has less fat than beef - simply cooked it is a little sweeter and slightly gamier (if totally grass fed) than beef - totally grass fed beef is gamier than corn fed. But, it is really hard to tell the difference in most cases - especially when smoked or cooked with herbs, spices, etc. I honestly could not tell you the difference between a beef burger or a bison burger, chili, stew, etc. Trust me, when I lived in Colorado I ate a lot of it.

Now, as for the size of your meat cuts - it depends on the age of the animal and the meat cutter. Bison, because it is "exotic", is going to cost more than beef. If you're buying x-oz steaks, that's what you are getting - not a steak that represents the size that the steak could be. The bison chuck roasts that I used to get were about twice the size of a beef chuck roast the same thickness.

Moose and bear have much more distinctive flavors.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2008, 09:47 PM   #19
Some Like it Hot
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I can't thank you enough Michael. I guess I did not even take into account that I was getting 8 oz steaks, a real noodle head I can be at times!

I do get grass fed beef and you are correct, it does have a gamier flavor than grain fed beef.

Thank you for taking to time to answer my rather ignorant questions! :)
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2008, 09:48 PM   #20
Some Like it Hot
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
On another note: I never got around to making that chili on Sunday, I think it will be on this weekend's menu! I'm excited!
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.