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Old 04-08-2005, 03:32 PM   #1
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Wine Snobs

I am ever amused - and more than a litle disgusted - by people who believe themselves true connoisuers of fine wines. Certainly there are those out there who really do have a true appreciation of the nuances of flavors among wines, but those are few and far between. Too many are self styled "experts" who use complex teminology to presumably convince we peons that they know whereof they speak.

I enjoy wine - have a small glass with most meals. I've tried the expensive ones, and the supermarket specials. What I find is the foods the wine accompanies has a great deal more to do with one's enjoyment of a wine than does its inherent quality. For example, recently I enjoyed a good Cabernet Sauvignon with an entree of beef - but something else with the dinner (I've forgotten what) made the wine almost unbearable.

Two nights ago, Chardonnay went quite well with crisp fried catfish. And last night it was good with a tostada replete with guacamole and frijoles refritos (fried with lard, of course!). But lunch today, of a nice tomato, cheese, and bassil bruschetta, enjoyed on a beautiful spring day in the garden, made the Chardonnay taste like nectar of the Gods.

So for me, the recomendations of the wine snobs are generally to be ignored: one merely needs to try a wine - regardless of price or year or recommendation: if it is liked, then enjoy it. If not, try, try again.

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Old 04-08-2005, 03:52 PM   #2
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oldcoot, i know the type.
i took a winetasting course and went in knowing 1 thing: i like wine.
i left knowing 2: i like wine and it's hard to learn when you're tipsy.
seriously, i did learn a lot, but i couldv'e picked up alittle more than i did.
the class was packed full, and i met a lot of really nice people who were all friendly. some were pretty well-versed on wine but were very subtle about it. but there was that ONE couple: they were glued at the hip, newlywed 26 year-olds, only 2 years older than myself and decades younger than the vast majority of the class, yet fancied themselves absolute experts, high and mighty, we-know-all-there-is-to-know-about-wine, experts. such experts, in fact, that when i said that a certain red we were tasting would go well with bleu cheese, the girl rolled her high and mighty eyes and informed me in an oh-so-condascending manner that you cannot eat bleu cheese with wine. (oh yeah? watch me!!!!!! )
all this because they went to france for a honeymoon and had taken this same class once before. and i find myself thinking once again, 'if you know so much about wine, why are you in a wine tasting class?' (aren't classes for learning, or did i miss something?)
but all the older folks who really DID know wine were awesome and those who didn't had a ball. but those uptight holier than thou snoots just made fools of themselves and dipped far into my reserve of patience, lol. thier loss!
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Old 04-08-2005, 04:49 PM   #3
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I'm a "snob"...

I think I'm a "wine snob"... the bottles I buy MUST have a cork in them.

If I can twist the cap off with my fingers... I don't buy it
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Old 04-08-2005, 05:21 PM   #4
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I totally agree, oldcoot. I really like wine too and I make a recommendation if I find something I really like but I couldn't tell you what the "bouqet" consists of. I don't really pay attention to the snobs.
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Old 04-08-2005, 05:37 PM   #5
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oldcoot, I have known these snobs. To make a point, a group of friends and I got to gether for a regular potluck years ago. The club would purchase wine (Franzia in a box) in chablis and burgundy. One of the members said OMG, wine is a box, ugh, I only drink the French wines...... The next time we got together, we used the same wine, but the hostess put the wine in decanters on all the tables. The same lady ranted and raved about the wine and how much better it was than the boxed one, what brand was it??? We never told her the truth but rather enjoyed her comupance, she was a sorority snob.
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Old 04-08-2005, 05:40 PM   #6
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Hi Luvs, Oldcoot, and other posters, I agree totally.

Once took a tasting course and a lot of the students would go on about subtle tastes in the wine that I never could find (a tint of peach, yes, definitely peach).

At the end of the course they had a test, a blind tasting.

I won! Not because I knew squat about wine, which I still don't, because I kept my responses simple, the KISS principle.

When others were getting very complex in their answers I would just write down Burgundy or something simple.

When I won I think it ticked off a lot of the students who actually thought they knew something.

As far as wine with bleu cheese, sure sounds fine to me.

Take care.
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Old 04-08-2005, 06:02 PM   #7
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Quote:
The club would purchase wine (Franzia in a box) in chablis and burgundy.
Well, that would probably be okay then, Norg. Boxes don't have screw caps...

Seriously, there are some "screw cap" wines that are pretty good... a Chianti is one.. but I can't remember who makes it now (Livingstone, or something like that).. I'd recognize it when I see it.

I used to use this Chianti, mostly to cook with.. and I never cook with something I won't drink... I served it with a pasta dinner to some friends and had rave compliments... I later told them it costs $7.99 for 1.5 liters :) . Made some converts that night.
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Old 04-08-2005, 06:34 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luvs_food
i said that a certain red we were tasting would go well with bleu cheese, the girl rolled her high and mighty eyes and informed me in an oh-so-condascending manner that you cannot eat bleu cheese with wine. (oh yeah? watch me!!!!!! )
I love Stilton with a $14 bottle of Porto....yummy. That couple don't know crap. They don't know what they are missing. Porto is good with fruit too. A decent Porto is my favorite drink. You don't have to spend more than $13-$22 for a nice Porto. Many port wines are made throughout the world but the best in my opinion is from Portugal. I like Sandeman.
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Old 04-08-2005, 07:10 PM   #9
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Ok, I think that I am in the minority here. How did you all come to like/love various wines? I've tried a couple here and there (some sort of Chianti, a dessert wine, pink stuff and white stuff). As you can see, I don't have ANY knowledge of the stuff, only whether or not it tastes good.

I can handle drinking it sometimes when I'm not eating, but I actually think drinking wine ruins my meal. I've tried the whole eat a steak and have red wine thing and it just didn't do it for me. It ruined my wonderful steak, so I stopped drinking it!

Could it be because I am not used to it?? **side note, I don't drink much alcohol AT ALL due to the tasted. The few times I do drink, it's a foo foo drink that's blended.
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Old 04-08-2005, 07:38 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by htc
Ok, I think that I am in the minority here. How did you all come to like/love various wines? I've tried a couple here and there (some sort of Chianti, a dessert wine, pink stuff and white stuff). As you can see, I don't have ANY knowledge of the stuff, only whether or not it tastes good.

I can handle drinking it sometimes when I'm not eating, but I actually think drinking wine ruins my meal. I've tried the whole eat a steak and have red wine thing and it just didn't do it for me. It ruined my wonderful steak, so I stopped drinking it!

Could it be because I am not used to it?? **side note, I don't drink much alcohol AT ALL due to the tasted. The few times I do drink, it's a foo foo drink that's blended.
I agree about the Wine with Meal thing. I never drink wine with my meals. Otherwise I don't enjoy it. However I like wine wuth salty snacks,cheese,and crackers.

Here is a good guide for those who want to match food with wine.

Wine & Food Matching Chart

FoodPreparationIngredientsWine IdeasSoups.Cream Dry Oloroso Sherry ..StockDry RieslingFoigras..SauternesChickenGrilledLime, lemon, garlic, saltSauvignon Blanc, Semillion, Pinot Grigio, Rosè.BarbecuedSmokedBeaujolais, Cotes du Rhone Villages.BakedCream SauceChardonnay, Pinot Blanc.BakedTomato sauce w herbsBarbera, Zinfandel.RoastGarlic pepper, paprikaMerlot, Chianti, Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay.FriedBatterRosè, Beaujolais.Stir FriedVegetables, ginger, soy sauceRiesling, Gewurztraminer, Chardonnay.PoachedChampagne, citrus juiceChampagne, White BordeauxTurkeyRoastedSaga, dressingPinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, ChardonnayFishGrilledCitrusSauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Sparkling wine.PoachedLight sauce, herbsDry Riesling, Champagne.SautéedBatter, Cajun styleChenin Blanc, off-dry Riesling, Sparkling wine.Pan friedLemon butterSauvignon Blanc, Chablis, Semillion, SancerreSalmonPoachedMedium herbsPinot Noir (red), Pinot Gris (white).PoachedCream sauceViognier.GrilledGlaze coating or dried herbsCabernet Franc, Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Blanc de NoirsScallopsGrilledCitrus, butterChardonnay, sancerre, dry RieslingLobsterSteamedButterChardonnay, Sparkling wine.SteamedCitrusPouilly-fume, Sancerre, ChablisMussels, ClamsSteamedButter, garlicChardonnay, pouilly-fume, SemillionLamb LegRoastedRose' maryCabernet Sauvignon.RoastedGarlicZinfandelLamb StewbakedVegetable, herbsPinor Noir, Cabernet SauvignonSteakGrilledDried herbsSyrah, Cabernet Sauvignon, ZinfandelPork LoinRoastedHerbsChianti, ZinfandelPrime RibRoastedSalt and pepperPinot Noir, BurgundyPasta.Meat sauceChianti, Barolo, Barbera, Zinfandel..Clam sauceSauvignon Blanc..ArabiattaRosèGameRoastedMild herbsSyrah, Petite Syrah, BordeauxDuckBakedAl'orangePinot Noir, Beaujolais, Gewurztraminer.RoastedHerbsPinot Noir, ZinfandelHamburger or Meat LoafbakedHerbsYoung Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Zinfandel, ChiantiSteak Tar tare.HerbsBeaujolaisShort RibsbakedTomato saucePinot Noir, ZinfandelMild Cheeses..Chardonnay, RieslingMedium Cheeses..Young Pinot NoirHearty, Ripe Cheeses..Burgundy, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Port


A FEW GENERAL RULES
  • Either a complement or a contrast should be considered.
  • The main flavor in the main dish are usually matched to the main flavor in the wine. For example, roasted lamb leg with rosemary classically would be matched with red bordeaux. If garlic is the main flavor in the lamb, aim for a spicier wine, such as a very ripe zinfandel.
  • Beef isn't always prepared the same way. A spencer roast is similar to prime rib and would be complemented by a medium-framed pinot noir. However, if the roast is covered in herbs and garlic, perhaps a syrah is better.
  • When in doubt, California sparkling wine and quality rosè wines are classic all-purpose matches for a wide variety of cuisine's.
  • With Asian foods, keep in mind the heat and the sweetens. If the main dish is either fairly sweet or hot, choose an off-dry wine, preferably with lower alcohol, such as a German riesling.
  • With salty foods, pick an off-dry wine with flowery character, such as a gewürztraminer.
  • Chilled dishes usually have less overt flavors and thus a delicate wine would work well. Try a pinot gris or pinot blanc from Italy.
  • Don't try to match wine with foods containing noticeable amounts of vinegar, such as salads, though salads with cream dressing work well.
  • Finally, in hot climates, and 90 degrees and higher is not uncommon in many states, avoid wines with high alcohol contents when dining outdoors. How about just a cold beer. Bon appetite.

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