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Old 07-24-2011, 01:55 PM   #341
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Habanero - Very hot chilli. Sorry made a type O!
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Old 07-24-2011, 02:10 PM   #342
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Arugula

An aromatic salad green. It is also known as rocket, roquette, rugula and rucola, and is popular in Italian cuisine. It is a species of Eruca native to the Mediterranean region, from Morocco and Portugal east to Lebanon and Turkey. Vernacular names include garden rocket, or simply rocket (British, Australian & New Zealand English), eruca, rocket salad, and arugula (American and Canadian English). All names ultimately derive from the Latin word eruca, a name for an unspecified plant in the family Brassicaceae, probably a type of cabbage.
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Old 07-24-2011, 02:12 PM   #343
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Ginger Snaps - Crisp and sweet ginger flavoured biscuits
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Old 07-24-2011, 08:06 PM   #344
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Green Grapes

This thread is very educational..I love it!!
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Old 07-24-2011, 09:34 PM   #345
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eau de vie

An eau de vie (plural, eaux de vie also spelled eau-de-vie and eaux-de-vie) is a clear, colorless fruit brandy that is produced by means of fermentation and double distillation. The fruit flavor is typically very light.


It's your thread Simonbaker!

It's only doing what you initiated and revised. It *is* fun to learn new information about foods!
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Old 07-24-2011, 09:40 PM   #346
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Deviled eggs
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Old 07-24-2011, 09:42 PM   #347
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Idli

A south Indian savory cake popular throughout India. The cakes are usually two to three inches in diameter and are made by steaming a batter consisting of fermented black lentils (de-husked) and rice. The fermentation process breaks down the starches so that they are more readily metabolized by the body. The earliest mention of idli in India occurs in Tamil sangam literature. Also the aromatic flavour of Sambaar been mentioned in it around 6 CE. It is also found in Kannada writing of Shivakotiacharya in 920 CE.
Most often eaten at breakfast or as a snack, idlis are usually served in pairs with chutney, sambar, or other accompaniments. Mixtures of crushed dry spices such as milagai podi are the preferred condiment for idlis eaten on the go.
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Old 07-24-2011, 09:46 PM   #348
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Iceburg lettuce
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Old 07-24-2011, 09:49 PM   #349
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Bovril

The trademarked name of a thick, salty meat extract, developed in the 1870s by John Lawson Johnston and sold in a distinctive, bulbous jar. It is made in Burton upon Trent, Staffordshire, owned and distributed by Unilever UK.

Bovril can be made into a drink by diluting with hot water, or less commonly with milk. It can also be used as a flavouring for soups, stews or porridge, or spread on bread, especially toast, rather like Marmite.

The first part of the product's name comes from Latin bos (genitive bovis) meaning "ox" or "cow." Johnston took the -vril suffix from Bulwer-Lytton's then-popular 1870 "lost race" novel The Coming Race, whose plot revolves around a superior race of people, the Vril-ya, who derive their powers from an electromagnetic substance named "Vril.
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Old 07-24-2011, 09:52 PM   #350
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rice
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