"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Soups, Stews & Casseroles > Soups
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-26-2014, 06:35 PM   #21
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,034
If the coloring of the stock is that important, and you are not getting it from deglazing, then I would like to suggest adding a tsp. or so of Kitchen Bouquet or Gravy Master. It does have a mild flavor of beef also. You might want to try a small amount of Better Than Bullion also, beef flavor.

Also, if you soak the barley overnight, and then add it to the stew for cooking, it won't soak up as much of the broth. I leave out the potatoes anytime I add a grain to any soup. With all the other veggies, you will have more than enough carbs when the grain is added.
__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2014, 11:36 PM   #22
Executive Chef
 
Rocklobster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,787
When adding rice or barley, I par boil it first in a separate pot, drain it, then add it to the soup later. This helps remove some starch which can change a soup and it also prevents over thickening of the soup which can occur if you add too much at the beginning. I just gradually add what I think is good for me and let it finish off. If the soup could use some more, then I add more. It removes the guesswork at the beginning. Nothing worse than too much rice or barley. You can end up with a thick gloppy mess. It can ruin a soup by absorbing all of the broth and waste all the time and effort it took to make it. Very disapointing....
__________________

__________________
Rocklobster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2014, 12:31 PM   #23
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 2,838
Quote:
Originally Posted by purple.alien.giraffe View Post
I'm not positive but I don't think it's the bones you are browning so much as the marrow, fat, and any remnants of meat and blood on/in the bones. The bones themselves may not really brown but just have streaks of browned areas where there was blood or meat on them. I agree with Taxy that you can remove the marrow if you don't want to lose it and that you should deglaze the roasting pan. And smaller bones are definitely the way to go because then the water actually reaches all of the marrow. Too large and you may have marrow trapped in the bone that can't add flavor to the stock.

Other than that, I know the best homemade beef stock I've had was made with beef heart that had been browned and then used to make the stock. I haven't tried making it myself this way, just got to eat the results. I've also had soup made with grilled beef and that was pretty amazing too.

One thing my dad taught me about making beef soups is that whenever you cook a steak or hamburger or beef of any kind, if you aren't already going to deglaze the pan for what you are making, deglaze it with just a little water and freeze the results. Keep a container that you add to each time. Eventually you'll have enough to add to a stock or make a gravy or whatever. It's not easy to get a strong beef flavor so this can be a big help.

I find roasted/browned carrots add an amazing flavor to beef broth. I also like browned onion and roasted or browned garlic. Roasted tomatoes or peppers (sweet, green, or chilis, they all work) are really good too. And I like to add something to give it a "green" flavor. Depending on what I'm going for this might be celery, spinach, green beans, or even bok choy. And rutabega is really good in beefs soups. Roasted cauliflower and brocoli are good. Zuchini and yellow crook neck are good too. Oh, sweet potato is awesome in beef soup.

I love bay leaf or rosemary in beef soups. Parsely, oregano, and basil are good too.

A little soy sauce added to the broth can give it a little extra "something". Just use a little so it's a highlight instead of a prominent flavor and remember to reduce/omit the amount of salt you are adding. A little balsamic or cider vinegar can be really good, especially if you are adding sweeter vegetables. Worcestershire or steak sauce can also add a little something extra. I add it to the meat as it's cooking, not to the stock. I think it comes out with a better flavor that way and also gives the meat it's own flavor in the soup.

I also love asian inspired beef soups too so that is another direction you could explore eventually. Add various asian flavorings, spices, and vegetables. Beef soup that tastes like a good shredded beef taco is really good. Add a little lime, lots of corriander, garlic, onion, and maybe peppers, with tortilla strips added just before serving. Or use your favorite carne asada recip and adjust that into a soup.

Sorry, I know this comes a little late for your current soup but maybe it will be useful next time.
Right on brother!
Thanks for the ideas. I think like you and have incorporated several tips already with other stocks. Like I said i have never actually made beef stock. It is very different than chicken or seafood stock.

When I was roasting the bones, the middles were melting away. The marrow was pure fat from the appearance of the drippings. The marrow had no color at all. The rounds were pure white. Is that the way they should look?
Is this fat conducive to the stock or is it just the bones themselves that impart the beef flavor?
I could care less about the marrow unless its what flavors the stock. But like I said it was melting to pure, clear fat.

Update. The soup was very good and had a very good beef flavor. The color of the stock was little issue as browning the beef chunks and aromatics along with a couple cups of reduce red wine provided all the color required.
It actually tasted like I added some A-1 for some reason. I like A-1, but did not expect to get that type of flavor. Maybe it was the wine?

Thank you all very much........John
__________________
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2014, 08:13 PM   #24
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,858
You said you started with about 2 pounds of bones. From what part of the cow are the bones? And how much liquid did you add? In other words, how much stock did you make from 2 pounds of bones?

From my culinary school cooking fundamentals book, the standard ratio of ingredients to make 1 gallon of beef stock is:

- 8 pounds bones, preferably neck; something with lots of collagen
- 1 pound standard mirepoix (1/2 pound onions and 1/4 pound each carrots and celery, unpeeled, roughly chopped)
- 2 ounces tomato paste
- 6 quarts liquid
- 3 stems parsley (use leaves in soup)
- 1/2 tsp dried thyme (I use fresh because I grow it)
- 1 bay leaf
- 1/2 tsp cracked black peppercorns

You've gotten great advice on technique already. I think the problem is likely the ratio of bones to liquid and possibly the bones you used.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2014, 12:57 AM   #25
Master Chef
 
Cheryl J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 6,298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
When adding rice or barley, I par boil it first in a separate pot, drain it, then add it to the soup later. This helps remove some starch which can change a soup and it also prevents over thickening of the soup which can occur if you add too much at the beginning. I just gradually add what I think is good for me and let it finish off. If the soup could use some more, then I add more. It removes the guesswork at the beginning. Nothing worse than too much rice or barley. You can end up with a thick gloppy mess. It can ruin a soup by absorbing all of the broth and waste all the time and effort it took to make it. Very disapointing....
I do the same thing. I love pearl barley with a beef vegetable soup, but always parboil it first and add it later. Otherwise, it not only wicks up the lovely brown beef broth, but also clouds up what's left with an unattractive whiteness.
__________________
Grandchildren fill the space in your heart you never knew was empty.
Cheryl J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2014, 07:24 AM   #26
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,362
I rinse the barley to get rid of surface starch before adding it to the soup. Then I cook it in the soup so it has the same great beef flavor. if you don't track the barley to broth ratio, you can always add more broth.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2014, 01:21 PM   #27
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 2,838
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
You said you started with about 2 pounds of bones. From what part of the cow are the bones? And how much liquid did you add? In other words, how much stock did you make from 2 pounds of bones?

From my culinary school cooking fundamentals book, the standard ratio of ingredients to make 1 gallon of beef stock is:

- 8 pounds bones, preferably neck; something with lots of collagen
- 1 pound standard mirepoix (1/2 pound onions and 1/4 pound each carrots and celery, unpeeled, roughly chopped)
- 2 ounces tomato paste
- 6 quarts liquid
- 3 stems parsley (use leaves in soup)
- 1/2 tsp dried thyme (I use fresh because I grow it)
- 1 bay leaf
- 1/2 tsp cracked black peppercorns

You've gotten great advice on technique already. I think the problem is likely the ratio of bones to liquid and possibly the bones you used.
I have no idea as the what part the bones came from. They were almost perfectly round after they were cut and were as white in the middle (marrow) as the outer bone was.
I also did not use enough bones it seems. I used two pounds or so to make about two quarts of finished stock.

The package said beef bones, not soup bones. The soup bones i have seen in the past had some meat on them. The bones I used had no meat. Not one bit of meat.
If I had to guess, these were leg bones. I will ask next time I am in the store. Thank you....
__________________

__________________
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
beef, soup

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.