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Old 09-06-2007, 01:26 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
At that time, I take a bowl of just liquid and let it cool. Beat the raw egg in a separate bowl and slowly add the warm soup into it stirring constantly so egg doesn’t cook, it has to dissolve in the soup. Not sure, what the process is called in English. Add this mixture back to the pot, again stirring to make sure that egg doesn’t get cooked.
It's called "tempering" in English. So, you tempered the egg before adding it to the soup.

This recipe sounds good! I don't think I've ever had borscht, so I'll have to try it. Thanks!
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Old 09-06-2007, 02:38 PM   #12
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Thank you.

It really isgood.

It is so hot and humid outside right now that nothing else sounds good. But this is really very simple and yumy. If you use canned beets the whole prepation takes no more than 20-25 minutes.
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Old 09-06-2007, 03:34 PM   #13
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Borscht, hot:

Meat about 3 lbs.
Water -3 quarts
Onion finely chopped or diced – 1
Potato diced – 2-3
Carrots grated – 2-3
Beets grated – 1-2 (could be canned, but not pickled)
Cabbage I buy coleslaw salad – 1-2 cups, or great your own.
White beans, I use canned, you can use as much as whole can or about a half would be good.
1 tablespoon of ketchp or tomato sauce for coloring.
Secret ingredient (recipe to fallow). – 2-3 table spoons
Salt and pepper to taste.

Start by making good meat broth. Use whatever meat you like. Lately I’ve been using chicken. But pork or beef is definitely great. Short ribs are good. But in my opinion, the best part is cross cut shank meat with marrow bone. The reason for that is broth comes out with a hint of tartness. I do not know why it is. And that is exactly what you want in borscht. If you search for other recipes you’ll find that some of them use lemon juice, some use citric acid, also known as sour salt, or pickled beets, or sauerkraut, and then they have to add sugar to compensate...

Nonsense. All those things will only ruin natural taste of Borscht. If I use beef I cook it for a long time to make sure the meat is extremely soft, and practically melts in your moth so you do not have seat and chew the darn thing for half an hour. While meat is cooking prepare all the vegetables. Again like in the cold borscht recipe you can use fresh or canned beets. If using fresh beets they will take an hour or so to cook. I cook the whole thing and then take it out immerse in the cold water, grate and add almost at the end of the process.
I do not like onion, so I usually put it in early so it over cooks to the point that you can’t even see it. Adds great flavor. Cook potato, carrots, coleslaw, beans. Should take about half an hour or less.

Some people will tell you that I do not know what I’m doing or talking about. The true purists of an authentic Ukrainian Borscht will sauté their beets, onion and carrots in some fried pork fat, yum. Very unhealthy, I do not do it anymore.
So, I do not worry about them anymore. Taste of my Borscht is very refine.

Now the secret ingredient. Indeed some people will add the same ingredients separately but I make this special concoction (I do not know what to call it in English, so please help me out somebody here). In fact I use it for many soups and other dishes, especially when I make spaghetti sauce.

Here it is:

10 sweet red bell peppers (any color is good, but not green)
10 hot peppers or go by weight use same amount (it could be any hot peppers you like, depending on how hot you like your food)
3-4 heads of garlic
2 table spoons of salt (works as preservative)

Cut, remove seeds, wash, put everything thru meat grinder or, if using food processor make sure not to chop very fine.

Right now is a perfect time to make this mixture. There are so many fresh veggies, I make the whole recipe put in couple of jars and keep it in refrigerator for up to 6 month. It actually never last that long I use it up faster. You can scale the recipe down.

When Borscht is nearly ready add couple spoons of the mixture. Taste and re-season to taste. Hm, that sounds funny; probably I am spelling something wrong.

Serve hot with a spoon of sour cream and hearty bread. Russian will have a clove of garlic seating right next to the plate and they will keep bighting into it. Not sure about taste but very healthy.


Okay, please correct my spelling and other grammar as this is the first, fresh of the press, version. If you have any questions, feel free to ask.
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Old 09-06-2007, 03:48 PM   #14
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I probably should add this to my Ukrainian recipe thread, but can't find it for some reason.
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Old 09-07-2007, 10:47 PM   #15
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Hi, Yes this could go under a Ukrainian Recipe thread very easily. I have assembled a good collection of beet soup or borsch recipes I modestly call the World's Best Borsch. They are all genuine and excellent. This is my second post and they say I may not display a url ): until I do twenty, well I can play that :) Meanwhile go to Books by Volunteers who serve Ukraine Orphans and click on the World's Best Borsch tab. Let me know what you think! You may reply right there in the About Us tab. Thanks, happy cooking - and yes I guarantee those recipes are good. They are hand picked. David
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Old 09-08-2007, 08:54 AM   #16
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hmmm, an orphanage and soup recipes.

sounds like there's a story in there somewhere.

"please sir, may i have some... more?"

i'm goin' to check it out. thanks dave.
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Old 09-08-2007, 10:56 AM   #17
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Beet Soup

Hi buckey tom from joisey, Yes there is a bit of a story in borsch and me. Not a big deal but it's surprised me how one thing has led to another. Beet soup, kasha, mushroom soup, pampushky, vereneky and some other things including one awsome tort, recipe from a Ukrainian-American origianlly from Lviv to Kyiv to the North East. Awsome. David
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Old 09-08-2007, 12:53 PM   #18
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Lviv Ukraine Vegetarian Borsch

Here goes, I'm trying to copy directly from website that has to do with ukraine orphans dot net. Hope this works - the recipe is simple, has nothing to do with ribs or meat of any kind and is absolutely authentic Ukrainian. Enjoy! David
Lo, maybe it worked - help me to get my twenty posts so I can reveal this mysterious place - it accepts no money! Isn't that nice. D I'm back, the place is Books by Volunteers who serve Ukraine Orphans, Enjoy, D




Lviv Vegetarian Borsch which probably should be spelled Borshch



from Dr. Oksana, originally from Lviv, now of the USA



her Babcia Lidia’s recipe



Notes from Oksana: “I keep my borshch vegetarian, but if you want to make it chicken-based, you can use chicken broth as a base for the borshch. I always experiment, my borshch is never exactly the same :), but we enjoy all versions of it. Eat it with sour cream, add sour cream right before serving. Some people add lemon juice and minced garlic. They say borshch is more tasty next day, and perfect after it stays in the fridge for two days.”


Here is a starter recipe for her excellent borshch.


Ingredients


2 – 3 beet roots
2 – 3 laurel (bay) leaves
4 – 5 black pepper corns
salt to taste
2 – 3 large carrots sliced
1 parsley root, chopped (Here in sunny Marion Ohio, USA, parsley root is hard to find so I often use some parsnip root. It works for me. D)
lima (large) beans from can or cook the beans separately
1 medium onion, diced
cooking oil
lemon juice, optional
minced garlic, optional
sour cream


Instructions


“I cook my beet roots whole, without peeling, separately from anything else, till they are ready (softish), which takes about an hour, or more,” Dr. O.


This is the way I did it (D). Often I roast the beets for borshch but for this I boiled well scrubbed beets in about a liter (quart) of water and then set the beets aside. The purple cooking water was strained through a coffee filter and became the soup base.


Bring the soup base to a boil and add laurel leaves, pepper corns, about a teaspoon of salt (and for D a few sprinkles of garlic salt). Let the spices steep with the base for a few minutes.


Thinly slice the carrots and parsley root, dice the onion, rub the skins off the cooked beet roots and grate with the larger openings on your grater.


Mince the garlic if you are using – depends on taste and you know your taste.


Remove the pepper corns from the base, bring it up to a gentle boil and add the carrots and parsley root.


Sauté the diced onion and when they are almost translucent add the minced garlic if using and sauté all but do not brown.


When the carrots and parsley (or parsnip) are appropriately soft add the sautéed onion and garlic, the cooked lima beans and the grated beets.


“Let just get to the boiling point, and turn off right away, do not let it boil, or you’ll lose that beautiful burgundy color.” Dr. O


Allow the flavors to meld. Check for taste, does it need to be reseasoned? Would you care to add some tartness with lemon juice, does it need some salt?


Dr. O continues, “If you like it more spicy, add Vegeta before you add the beets, let the water boil for 4 – 5 minutes.”


About Vegeta from Wikipedia: Vegeta is produced by Podravka, a company in Koprivnica, Croatia. The ingredients include salt, dehydrated vegetables (carrot, parsnip, onions, celery, parsley leaves), monosodium glutamate, sugar, cornstarch, spices, disodium inosinate, riboflavin (for coloring).


You can find it at Amazon.com, two kilos (2.2 pounds) for about $9.00 plus shipping.

Not bad price for that much spice I guess. I haven’t tried it. D


As I have been typing this recipe I have been eating two bowls of this very nice borshch. It’s light, lively and tasty. It’s also easy to put together. Wish I had some dark bread to go with, but then I would have bread crumbs in the key board! As it is I have a purple stain right there on my white T shirt – see it, right there in the middle! For real.


I thank Dr. Oksana for the recipe and her personal comments. I especially thank Babcia Lidia for helping to raise such a nice lady.


Enjoy, all the way from Lviv,


David

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Old 09-08-2007, 01:21 PM   #19
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Dear Alex, our esteemed Administrator :)! I love it, I just love it - there is nothing like word borsch (or beet soup) to start a good argument, or should I say discussion. I have read recipe reviews that are all over the map - one went on an absolute rant that borsch does not contain beets, it's not Ukrainian if it contains beets and one and on). As the lady who sent the recipe is some what emoved from from me I asked a nice lady from Western Ukranine, now here, to review the recipe for me. Her first comment, with a puzzled look, was "Where are the potatoes and cabbage?" Me, I have no clue, back in Lviv I guess. None in this one. I love it.
Posted in fun, because food should be fun. It is a blessing and when sharing recipes or the food itself it's hard to not be of good will. I hope you agree. David
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Old 09-09-2007, 09:55 PM   #20
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Hi! I'm back with beet soup from everywhere - almost! And I'm legal when I invite you to visit Books by Volunteers who serve Ukraine Orphans for a most excellent selection - donations are not asked for or accepted!

To take the mystery out of all this – borsch or otherwise some times known as beet soup, borscht, borshch, borstch, barszcz and who knows what else is a vegetable soup that is based on beets. The beets can be chopped, diced, sliced, pureed, made into fermented kvass, or just boiled to extract their juice which is used as a “stock”. Cabbage is an option no matter what people say.

For a good comparative selection of borsch recipes go to ukraineorphans.net. The recipes are most excellent, proudly selected by me if I must say so. Look in the World’s Best Borsch tab and you will find guaranteed authentic recipes. Enjoy! D

In case the URL police are watching – this is my twenty second post so I’m legal! J D
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