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Old 09-09-2007, 10:02 PM   #21
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One more note while I'm on the subject of borscht. I've yet to meet one that I didn't like! Enjoy, David
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Old 09-09-2007, 11:39 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by David Cottrell View Post
Posted in fun, because food should be fun. It is a blessing and when sharing recipes or the food itself it's hard to not be of good will. I hope you agree.
i have read many things on this site, but there are none that i agree with more.

kudos, david.

btw, have you mentioned borscht?
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Old 09-10-2007, 07:00 AM   #23
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Who told that borsch is traditionally Ukraine dish? I always thought that this is traditional Polish soup. It sounds like in Ukraine there is nothing to be proud of.
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Old 09-10-2007, 01:57 PM   #24
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P.S. I knew I'd forget something. I completely missed out on the beans and tomato sauce. Both can be added almost before the end. Beans are cooked already, so no need to cook them much longer. Tomato sauce is mostly for color and originaly it was probably tomatoes, but even if you did not put any it is not going to have that much affect. Hey, people put lemon juice and bay leaves, something the Ukrainian vilage has not seen probably ever.
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Old 09-10-2007, 02:07 PM   #25
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Who told that borsch is traditionally Ukraine dish? I always thought that this is traditional Polish soup. It sounds like in Ukraine there is nothing to be proud of.

Yes, indeed there is recipe for Polish Borscht, as well as Russian, or Hungarian or many others for that matter. But the original Borscht, according to some food historians, was originated in Ukraine. And as far as being proud Ukrainians have a lot to be proud of, especially when it comes to food. Your comment is at best foolish at worst is very rude .

And while I am on a subject of Borscht there are few and far between that I like, because majority of them are cheap imitation of an original.
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Old 09-10-2007, 02:11 PM   #26
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P.S.

to David. Traditional way to serve borscht is with garlic rolls, called pampushki and a side of buckweat kasha.
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Old 09-10-2007, 02:42 PM   #27
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Borsch and international arguments! :)

To CharlieD , honorable executive chef from a lowly assistant,. Kudos, kudos, and thank you - I told everyone that just mention borsch in an international forum and there could be a food fight! Everyone and I mean everyone wants to claim it, but yes indeed the food historians do believe it originated in Ukraine - sorry to everyone else. And in Poland and everywhere there is borsch - for the uninformed please go to Books by Volunteers who serve Ukraine Orphans and click on the World's Best Borsch tab. I'm hunting for a Hungarian possibility and maybe one from Belarus and perhaps another from Poland. Like I said, I haven't met a borsch I didn't like. Peace !

Yes, way back lemons were pretty scarce in Ukraine I expect - even up to recently,and bay leaves, well yes they are in use now sometimes called laural leaves in translation. Take a look at the little collection. I shall be adding a recipe for pampushka to the little collection there - with the garlic infused oil.
Kasha I like, but was not aware of it as something to go with borsch.

I do enjoy your comments and comments about the lore - borsch is a food folk lore is in not. I have read comments in other places where the writer went absolutely balistic about the subject. D
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Old 09-10-2007, 02:53 PM   #28
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Lemons are still scares in Ukrainian village, even nowadays.
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Old 09-10-2007, 02:56 PM   #29
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The great borsch war! :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by home cook View Post
Who told that borsch is traditionally Ukraine dish? I always thought that this is traditional Polish soup. It sounds like in Ukraine there is nothing to be proud of.
Dear Home Cook - I really like your website, Go Girl! If you might be of Polish tradition, please do remember that the Polish people are also Slavs just like the Ukrainians. Let there be peace between the tribes! Yes, informed food historians do believe that the basic dish originated in Ukraine - using beet roots. There is a old tradition of a soup in Poland going way back that apparently used nettles, Cow Parsley, barszcz? I forget now. Take a look at Books by Volunteers who serve Ukraine Orphans under the World's Best Borsch tab and look at the Polish recipes. Maybe you have another good one I could add - authentic Polish, maybe an old family favorite. Cheers, D
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Old 09-19-2007, 09:30 PM   #30
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My Mom always used sour salt aka citric acid crystals, in her borsch. I would like to make a pot like Mom's but I can not find sour salt any more in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Where do you Charlie D or anyone in my area get sour salt???

JC
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