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Old 08-23-2005, 11:46 AM   #21
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Andy ... LOL!

The nutritional info is from an actual block of Velveeta.

IMO Velveeta is tasteless and plasticine. When you are going to make something where the cheese is supposed to be the star, like cheese soup or fondue, IMO you need to use real cheese and good cheese at that. "Cheddar cheese" soup should taste like a nice cheddar cheese, seems to me. Otherwise, why make it? It's not that hard to get a decent consistencywit either soup or fondue. Grainy soup is likely from adding cheese to liquid that is too hot. Lumps and curdles can be from a number of things, including leaving the alcohol out of cheese beer soup or fondue. Using velveeta just because it melts easily doesn't make sense to me, unless you really like the mild taste. But again, this is just my opinion. ANd I am a confessed cheeseaholic.
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Old 08-23-2005, 11:57 AM   #22
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OK, so I missed the line about the info being for Velveeta! That's a big 'DUH!' for me.

I agree about using real cheese. I don't believe I've ever bought Velveeta.

I have gathered over time that you are a cheeseaholic. After reading your previous post, I have to wonder how often you eat boxed mac and cheese!
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Old 08-23-2005, 02:05 PM   #23
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I think I mentioned the "circumstances" under which I usually eat Kraft Mac and Cheese. Often with tuna fish added and sriracha sauce on top. Luckily these are infrequent these days. Earlier in life I did buy mac and cheese in larger quantities.

Once in a while I'll have a craving for it, but more likely I'll just make it from scratch 'cause it's not a heck of a lot harder than making it from the box.
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Old 02-21-2007, 12:02 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missvickie
Given the right circumstances, any dairy product will curdle (a process in which the curd protein, casein, coagulates and forms clumps). Acid, heat, and salt are the culprits. Cream resists curdling, so the more fat, and the fresher it is, the less likely dairy products like cheese will turn out clumpy in cooking .

Your best bet is to cook the soup without the cheese, and don't add any acids (like lemon juice or vinegar), or salt until just before serving. Add the cheese at the end of the cooking process. Heat over low or medium heat -- and this is the key -- don't heat it for long, and don't let it get above 180°F., so never let it boil.

I would use a recipe for a basic Mornay sauce -- make a roux with equal parts butter and flour, cook until golden, whisk in milk, heat until just below boiling, slowly stir in the grated cheese and then stir that into the finished soup... just watch that temperature and you won't end up with lumpy cheese globs or strings and a wheyish liquid.
Hi, I'm a new member here. I was just ready to post the problem I'm having when making my Potato and Cheese Soup when I came across your posting. Every once in awhile it seperates and looks like it curdled.. I'm so glad I seen your post. I'll sure follow it on how to correct this problem.
I have a stupid question , Even though the soup looks unappealing when it seperates like that, Is it safe to eat ?.. lol.. we're still alive so I guess it is... LOL... Thanks for your post.... Sparky
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Old 02-21-2007, 04:01 PM   #25
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Yes it is safe to eat.
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Old 02-21-2007, 04:23 PM   #26
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Thanks so much Candocook for your quick response...
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Old 03-03-2007, 08:28 PM   #27
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I like Velveeta, and am not ashamed to admit it. It's true that it won't hold a candle to a quality havarti, or great cheddar, or gorgonzola, but it's great for grilled cheese sandwiches. I've even blended real cheeses, added salt, and came up with a cheese that had the same consistance and flavor as Velveeta. But that's enough of that. I'm getting off topic.

The technique given by MissVickey is dead on. I have done this many times, and with many different types of cheese. The technique allows you to use a good aged cheddar, or Parmesano Regiano, or Asiago, or gorgonzola, or if you want to make it more stringy, just heat cream and add mozzerella, or provolone by finely grating and stirring slowly into 170' liquid. Add flavorings such as chives, parsley, oregano, or whatever sits your fancy. If you want to give it some color, and a little different flavor, add some tumeric.

Once you learn the technique of incorporating fresh cheese into a sauce, it opens a whole world of new menu items to your repetoir (sp).

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Old 03-04-2007, 10:54 AM   #28
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I just read in a magazine somewhere that if you put alittle white wine in it with make the clumps go away.Its worth a try and adds more flavor.
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Old 03-04-2007, 11:33 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpmcgrew
I just read in a magazine somewhere that if you put alittle white wine in it with make the clumps go away.Its worth a try and adds more flavor.
I believe the wine will help prevent clumps from forming but don;t think it will reverse the clumping process.
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