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Old 02-12-2006, 07:53 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by licia
I'm not sick, but my dd came back from Alaska quite sick, so it started my thought processes going. I'm eating so much citrus the germs have quite a time getting to me, but just in case I want dh to be able to open a can at least.
licia,
my m-i-l always kept chicken and beef broth on hand..When her twins and my DH were little and not feeling well, she would heat the broth, add a little pastina or tiny pasta then get the soup all most to a boil and whisk up and egg and slowly add it to the simmering soup, stirring to make what she called strings..They loved it and Dh will sometimes ask me to make him some strings

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Old 02-12-2006, 08:19 PM   #12
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I just brought some cartons of Campbell selects and other Organic soups and they are incredibly good. I tasted the tomato and roasted red pepper soup and it's rich and more like a bisque. They were on sale so I stocked up on a variety of them - Squash, Red Pepper, Tomato and others.

I think I will now use them over the canned varieties. If you have not tried them give them a shot and see if you like them better. I found their texture much better than the Progresso and Campbell canned versions.

There is nothing wrong to serve canned or carton soup once in a while with a sandwich or just some crusty store bought bread. Throw in a salad and you have a hearty meal in the winter months.
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Old 02-12-2006, 08:28 PM   #13
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I agree with the others that the Original Campbell's chicken/noodle is a great one to have on hand at all times. Progresso and Campbell's Chunky soups are good too. Growing up on ranches, my Mom usually made the Lipton's dry chicken/noodle soup for us when we were sick. I still remember the taste of that; haven't gotten that to make for a very long time as I almost always have soup that I made from scratch in my freezer.
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Old 02-13-2006, 12:36 AM   #14
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Strang how being sick can come with good memories... but I fondly remember
eating CCNS and vanilla ice cream when I was sick. That's still what I want today when ever I'm down and out.
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Old 02-13-2006, 03:03 AM   #15
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Primo brand makes a really good lentil soup. It's the "ready to serve" type, so you just heat and eat.

I also really like the reduced fat Campbells brand "cream" soups. Cream of mushroom, celery, and broccoli are all really tasty.
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Old 02-13-2006, 05:04 AM   #16
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i don't mean to be a curmudgeon, but give up salt for a few months, and then try canned soups. all you'll taste is salt, to the point where you think it's chemically searing your tongue. my advice is make your own and freeze them. many of the techniques involved in soup making are the same that are used in a myriad of other basic but crucial cooking techniques used in all ethnicities of cuisine, but because it's soup, or stew, the mistakes are easily forgiven and hidden.
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Old 02-13-2006, 05:23 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
i don't mean to be a curmudgeon, but give up salt for a few months, and then try canned soups. all you'll taste is salt, to the point where you think it's chemically searing your tongue. my advice is make your own and freeze them. many of the techniques involved in soup making are the same that are used in a myriad of other basic but crucial cooking techniques used in all ethnicities of cuisine, but because it's soup, or stew, the mistakes are easily forgiven and hidden.
This is quite true actually. Canned soups contain a lot of sodium. (most contain up to 50% of the recommended daily allowence for sodium )

That idea about making a batch of soup and freezing it is a good one, buckytom. I've done this and it works well. I portion it out into those bowl shaped tupperwares that way whenever I want a bowl I dont have to thaw out a whole batch... i can just reheat the one serving.

I also will make a batch of vegetable stock and freeze it in ice cube trays. Then whenever I want a quick, fresh, soup I can just chop up a few veggies (celery, onion, carrots, potato) and toss in some of the stock w/ some herbs.
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Old 02-13-2006, 09:58 AM   #18
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I have a few different brands of canned soup in my pantry. I haven't bought any of them, PeppA and her mother get them. Off the top of my head, there's some chicken noodle, a can of clam chowder, and some beef stew. We also have some "instant" chicken noodle soup packages, some different flavors of Ramen noodles, etc.

I wholeheartedly agree with buckytom. Commercial soups, and just about all commercial "convience foods" are loaded with salt. I make a point to cook the food first, taste it, then add salt if needed.

I was heating some of the chicken noodle a couple weeks ago, and had to doctor it up with a little of my homemade chicken stock (which I keep frozen in ice cubes), pepper, thyme, and sage. I don't think I added any salt to it.

I also agree with buckytom and grumblebee about freezing soups. However, a word of advice: Don't freeze soups with diced potatoes. The potatoes don't thaw very well. I'm not sure about rice in soups either. Lately, I've taken to cooking rice separately of the soup, and adding it later. This keeps the rice from overcooking in the soup after I take it off the heat, and before I store it.

I prefer to freeze stuff in ziplock-type baggies, as you can squeeze out the air, and don't have much of a problem with freezer burn. I've been known to freeze about 2 qt of chili at a time in a gallon ziplock. I'm sure you can freeze a pint or soup in a qt-size baggie for a single serving.

As I mentioned with the chicken stock, I freeze my stock in ice cube trays. I do this with chicken, beef, and seafood.
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Old 02-13-2006, 10:52 AM   #19
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I usually have a variety of canned soups in the cupboard (all various makes and models), but I also always have homemade soup in the freezer. The canned soups are there just for emergencies, but thankfully I have never had to use them.
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