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Old 05-03-2007, 12:04 PM   #11
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I think rule of thumb is to fill water to an inch or so higher than the chicken.
I will be just using one small whole chicken. I'd like to make save a few cups of stock for gravys. I only cook for 2
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Old 05-03-2007, 01:02 PM   #12
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I usually have one or two 1-liter bottles of frozen water in my freezer. When my broth cools to the touch, I "swish" the bottles in it. The fat sticks to the frozen bottles. I wipe the bottles off and swish some more. I can remove most of the fat using this technique. And to strain out "solids," I usually put a paper coffee filter in a large strainer and pour the stock through it. It takes more than one filter because of all the solids that are usually present.

I've developed what I think, and have been told, is an excellent chicken stock recipe. I'll post it in the "soups" section in a little while.
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Old 05-03-2007, 01:08 PM   #13
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No, you do not want to use the vegetables that make your stock in your soup. Use fresh ones.

I make my chicken stock from roasted chicken bones. Sometimes you can find bags of chicken bones/parts. Roast in oven until VERY brown - then continue with your chicken stock using these bones versus a whole chicken. This method gives a lovely golden color to the broth. Also, if you cut your onions in half and lay the cut side on a girddle/skillet and let cook until VERY browned/blackish then throw in pot, skin and all, this will also add to a beautiful color. I add parsley, other bits of left-over herbs, along with all the standard stuff that goes in making chicken stock, i.e., carrots, celery. I have even used left-over fennel, tomatoes, asparagus stalks, peppercorns, and flattened garlic cloves. Remember, you are flavoring water - don't be shy with your ingredients.
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Old 05-03-2007, 01:25 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by legend_018
The carrots, celery, onions ect. that you throw into the stock when your making the stock "not the soup"...do you use those in addition to the cut up carrots, celery onions you saute in butter and add to the soup?

Thanks so much for helping me out. It does look pretty easy.
I only use celery tops for the stock itself. That way if I save some for another recipie like rice or a pan sauce, it only has chicken flavor and a hint of celery for brightness.
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Old 05-03-2007, 01:47 PM   #15
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Make sure you always use proper cooling techniques for your chicken stock.
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Old 05-03-2007, 05:32 PM   #16
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Another idea re: straining the solids, I line my strainer with a couple layers of white Bounty paper towels to help absorb fat and catch the solids.
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Old 05-03-2007, 08:21 PM   #17
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I think I'm actually making this tomorrow. I'm doing my weekly grocery shopping one day early.....and I think tomorrow might be a good day to make it. yeahhhhhhhh
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Old 05-03-2007, 10:52 PM   #18
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One more tip to capturing the fat. Lay some cheesecloth across the top of the broth and chill it. As the fat solidifies, the cheesecloth will bind it together and you can lift it all out at once.
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Old 05-04-2007, 08:53 AM   #19
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should I put a temperature guage in the chicken?

I just started it. I'm waiting for it to come to a boil. Now I saw aprox 90 minutes, chicken might be done and if your going to use if for soup or pot pie or what ever...you should take it out of the pot and than continue simmering your broth on low for a few hours.

Should I still use a temperature guage to see if the chicken is done after 90 minutes. I'd hate to pull the whole chicken out to find out it's not done yet?
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Old 05-04-2007, 09:03 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by legend_018
I'd hate to pull the whole chicken out to find out it's not done yet?
If you quarter the chicken first, it's much easier to handle and it cooks quicker.
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