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Old 04-28-2015, 11:34 AM   #1
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Question Good Chicken Stock - left out overnight!

Yesterday I spent hours simmering organic chicken bones to make a chicken stock. I further reduced the stock to make it more concentrated/gloopy and transferred it to a container - meaning to freeze it when chilled. However, I forgot to do this! It was still beside the sink when I discovered it this afternoon. My kitchen is cool and it is still spring here, i.e. the conditions are not warm/hot.

So, some 24 hours on, I have just placed it in the freezer. 2 questions:-

1. Will it be OK to use or gone bad? (I have lost my sense of smell so don't have that detecting facility)

2. Stock can be kept up to 3 months in the freezer...should I reduce that to 2 months because I have left it out?

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Old 04-28-2015, 11:51 AM   #2
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We've gone over and over this topic; you know you will get a variety of answers. I would throw it out, but others would not. The only way to know for sure if it has gone bad is to eat it and see what happens Bacteria grow fastest between 40F/4C and 140F/60C. If your kitchen is below 60C, it's probably all right.

The guideline regarding freezing for up to three months refers to preserving the quality of the food - i.e., the quality will not be as good after that time. It has no bearing on the safety of the food.
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Old 04-28-2015, 01:18 PM   #3
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Well you have been here a lot longer than myself and I have not seen that this topic has been discussed 'over and over', i.e. surely it matters what food item is being discussed? Chicken STOCK I would think would be safer left out than chicken!

The guideline re. freezing surely HAS to take into account the safety factor as well as the quality of the food else it is a nonsense.

My kitchen must be below 60oc....I am currently in my warm living room and it is still only registering 22oc so 60oc sounds excessively hot!

I welcome other opinions here and will gauge it once I have enough feedback.
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Old 04-28-2015, 02:32 PM   #4
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Just to clarify....

The danger zone is between 40F/4C and 140F/60C. No doubt your kitchen is between those temperatures. That's the ideal temp for bacteria to multiply and no doubt your stock is teeming with the little buggers. Kitchens already have a lot of bacteria in them, no matter how well cleaned and are at a perfect temp for bacteria growth.

"Once they’ve germinated, bacteria multiply quickly in nourishing stock. They can double their numbers every 90 minutes at room temperature, every 15 minutes at body temperature. A single germinated spore can become 1,000 bacteria in a matter of hours, a billion in a few days."

I'd throw it out. Food poisoning is nothing to take lightly.

But there are schools of thought about vigorously boiling it before its eaten. Although this may emulsify the fat in your stock making it cloudy, some food scientists claim its a way to sanitize it. Others do not.

I suggest reading this very good article:
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/24/di...od-safety.html

With regard to freezing. Guidelines ARE about food quality, not safety. There is nothing unsafe about freezing something and then eating it years later. Freezing inhibits bacterial growth.

this might interest you: 6 Common Myths About Freezing Foods (Page 3) | Eating Well
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Old 04-28-2015, 02:42 PM   #5
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Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Just to clarify....

The danger zone is between 40F/4C and 140F/60C. No doubt your kitchen is between those temperatures.
Why do you say that my kitchen would be between these temperatures? Did you read my post above (#3) where I said my warm living room registers only 22oC, i.e. my kitchen is not even close to that temp, i.e. cold by comparison.

Yes, yes, I know all about bacteria multiplying. My point is the temperature is UNDER when this would occur. I am familiar with textbook knowledge. However, my conditions do not meet this criteria.

Also, surely boiling the stock (once I intend to use it) would kill the bacteria? (We are talking about LIQUID not a piece of meat here). Indeed, in the freezer link you gave it says:-

"Cooking it to the recommended temperature is the only way to ensure that your food is safe".

I am beginning to detect a difference on this forum between those who abide to science religiously and those that use it more as a guideline but weigh this up in the light of their own circumstances and engage their own rationale too. I am with the latter lot!

So, can anyone else give me the 2 answers as in my original post here? I would appreciate it. Thanks.
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Old 04-28-2015, 03:25 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creative View Post
Why do you say that my kitchen would be between these temperatures? Did you read my post above (#3) where I said my warm living room registers only 22oC, i.e. my kitchen is not even close to that temp, i.e. cold by comparison. .

Other than to point out that most kitchens are kept at a temperature above 40 degrees, I give up.
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Old 04-28-2015, 03:35 PM   #7
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Creative, are you saying your kitchen is basically refrigerator cold? If so I'd package it up and freeze it. If it's warmer than a fridge, I'd bring it back up to a boil at least before freezing but frankly I'd still use it as long as no one in your household is immune compromised or at risk, i.e. very young or very old.

And yes, there has been quite a debate over using food left out overnight. Don't remember exactly when but don't think it's been so long that you wouldn't have been a member, maybe you just missed it.
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Old 04-28-2015, 04:16 PM   #8
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You seem to do this often. We discussed this ad nauseam the last time you started a thread about leaving food out. You didn't like the answers you got then so you probably won't like the answers you get now.

I think the same answers still apply.

Food Left Out, Spoilage concern
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Old 04-28-2015, 04:21 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creative View Post
Why do you say that my kitchen would be between these temperatures? Did you read my post above (#3) where I said my warm living room registers only 22oC, i.e. my kitchen is not even close to that temp, i.e. cold by comparison.


it was between 4 and 40 deg Celsius.


BTW, I'd keep it.
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Old 04-28-2015, 04:51 PM   #10
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Lightbulb

Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Other than to point out that most kitchens are kept at a temperature above 40 degrees, I give up.
I did describe my kitchen as cool. This is where common sense is valuable i.e. not blindly abiding by the text book. Maybe most kitchens = with usual amounts of cooking, e.g. grilling and baking etc. I said COOL for a reason, notably, I had made the stock and hadn't used the cooker at all until the evening. Then, the only thing I made (i.e. using heat) was a simple chicken risotto i.e. not using either the grill or the oven.
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