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Old 10-06-2004, 08:58 PM   #11
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I LOVE fresh pea soup, like Wasabi wrote. My mom used to add to our bowl a scoop of mashed potatoes and some pieces of baked ham, it was so comfy!!!!!!!
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Old 10-06-2004, 09:34 PM   #12
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Most legume soups tend to settle. That is, the solids sink to the bottom and must be stirred up for each bowl-full of soup that is served. Settling can be prevented by binding the soup. This means that the solids are held in suspension so that the consistancy remains constant throughout the batch.

To bind pea, lentil, bean soups, etc., heat two tbs. butter in a saucier or suitable pan. Add the same amount of flour to create a roux. Imediatley turn the heat to medium and begin ladling small amounts of the soups stock into the roux while whisking briskly. Continue adding broth and whisking until a smooth sauce is formed. Pour this sauce into the remaining soup and stir until well-mixed. This doesn't affect the soup flavor, but thickens it just enough to prevent settling.

Of course, you will need to adjust the amount of roux to the amount of soup you make. Remember, you can always add more if you need to, but you can't take it out once it's in.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 10-07-2004, 03:01 AM   #13
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to debthecook - what a great idea! Your Mom knew what she was doing!
I will certainly try that next time! Thanks!




Good Luck!
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Old 10-13-2004, 01:29 AM   #14
 
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Dunno about "green pea" soup. but lets try this on!

Having a "bone-in" ham, this frequently leave you with bones, slins and scraps; so lets toss the lot in the pot with some water and simmer for an hour on low to medium heat, and cut away the edible ham bits...

Discard the balance of bones and skins...

add a diced onion, a chopped or minced carrot or three...

Mince a potato to thicken the mixture. a few cloves of garlic, chopped or minced, to satisfy my own tastes, a cup or so of green peas...

a package or two of Knorr Pea Soup Mix, and mix together well...

Some chopped ham from your leftovers...

If getting inventive, some green beans, split and sliced "long"...

keep it on low heat for a long time, and stir often...

freezes well, and with croutons as a condiment, is a fabulous and healthfull lunch or dinner...
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Old 11-13-2004, 09:08 PM   #15
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Godweed, I'm about to try your butter-flour addition to my pea soup. Can't really ever go wrong with adding more butter to anything, so I'm enthusiastic about your addition idea. Wish me luck.

Quick question: I added ham for the first time, boiling a hock for about two hours, skimming fat off broth, seperated the meat from fat and bone...but I added the meat back in the beginning stages of cooking the peas. Will this give me tough shards of meat, like when one adds turkey to the beginning of the cooking? Oh yeah, I did that with my turkey soup, ruined it real bad.
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Old 03-19-2005, 02:20 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
Most legume soups tend to settle. That is, the solids sink to the bottom and must be stirred up for each bowl-full of soup that is served. Settling can be prevented by binding the soup. This means that the solids are held in suspension so that the consistancy remains constant throughout the batch.

To bind pea, lentil, bean soups, etc., heat two tbs. butter in a saucier or suitable pan. Add the same amount of flour to create a roux. Imediatley turn the heat to medium and begin ladling small amounts of the soups stock into the roux while whisking briskly. Continue adding broth and whisking until a smooth sauce is formed. Pour this sauce into the remaining soup and stir until well-mixed. This doesn't affect the soup flavor, but thickens it just enough to prevent settling.

Of course, you will need to adjust the amount of roux to the amount of soup you make. Remember, you can always add more if you need to, but you can't take it out once it's in.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
Goodwood, thanks for the advice. I will try it tonight when I make my split pea soup.
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