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Old 10-05-2006, 07:05 PM   #11
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You can make fresh or frozen pea soup too. Give it a bit of a whiz with a stick blender, just leaving some whole. I like it with corn too. I have always told my grown kids to only add things that count towards the end product, so don't use water very much at all. We always add a tspn of sugar to our pea things, no matter what.
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Old 10-05-2006, 07:15 PM   #12
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i sauted the onions, leeks, carrots, celery. then added it to the chicken stock along with parsley, thyme, bay leaves, garlic, pepper, 3 smoked ham hocks, mushrooms, yellow and green split peas and a pinch of red pepper. i just cut all the meat off the hocks and put it back in. i might cook it uncovered for a while, then add some milk. this pea soup is screaming already. the kids already want dinner," were are starving to death dad", but they will just have to wait for mom.
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Old 10-05-2006, 07:30 PM   #13
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Sounds delish, Eagle.

I forgot to tell you all...you might wanta try this...I like a couple of good splashes of Louisiana Hot Sauce in my bowl of pea soup. Cornbread is an awfully good accompaniment, too.
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Old 10-05-2006, 10:03 PM   #14
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yes to both questions.
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Old 10-05-2006, 11:14 PM   #15
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I make a pot of split pea soup every week. I make it in my 8 quart pressure cooker. First add a couple quarts of water and the smoked meat. I usually use ham hocks (cut the meat around the circumference in 3 or 4 places), pork neck bones, pork shanks, or turkey legs or wings. I add 1 to 1/2 teaspoons of dried pepper flakes and 1 teaspoon of ground pepper and cook at full pressure (15 psi) for about 40 to 45 minutes. The meat at this point is falling off the bone, the bone collagen is fully detached and the marrow has dissolved into the liquid. Remove all bones. I next add my split peas (4 to 5 cups), onions, diced carrots, spices (dried mustard powder, thyme, bay leaf, cumin, fennel seed or ground fennel, sage, marjorem and liquid smoke. Add water to make up 8 quarts. Cook at high pressure for 15 to 18 minutes.

Let stand for about 30 minutes before serving to fully thicken. Add water to thin if necessary.
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Old 10-08-2006, 06:55 AM   #16
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A family favorite. Constance, we used to sing-song "pea soup and johnny cake, makes a French-man's belly ache." We are French-Canadian ancestry, and the johnny cake was corn bread. Now that fall is here, it is time to hit my favorite butcher for his great ham hocks and make a batch for the freezer. My hint on the subject is to stew the ham hocks for an hour or two before adding the peas. You get more flavor from them that way. Chopped carrots and potatoes I consider to be an option (I usually DO put them in), but an onion or two and a clove or two of garlic are must-dos. I, too, would save the chicken stock. The peas and smoked meat would just overwhelm it.
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Old 10-08-2006, 11:45 AM   #17
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That's pretty cool, Claire. They're Johnny cakes up in the Far North, and Hoe cakes in the deep South.
Whatever you call it, cornbread is some good stuff.
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Old 10-08-2006, 11:53 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance
That's pretty cool, Claire. They're Johnny cakes up in the Far North, and Hoe cakes in the deep South.
Whatever you call it, cornbread is some good stuff.
In a fit of laziness a couple of weeks ago when I made lentil soup for supper, instead of making cornbread in my cast-iron skillet as I always do, I made corn cakes. Like pancakes. Instead of using regular milk in my favorite recipe, I used buttermilk and poured the batter onto a hot greased griddle. Omigosh, these little babies puffed up beautifully and they were great with the soup.

We had the leftovers the next morning for breakfast with butter and syrup. Buck said he likes the corn cakes better than cornbread in the skillet.
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Old 10-08-2006, 12:28 PM   #19
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Katie, I have a friend who makes them in a waffle iron. I've never tried it, as my waffler is ancient and buried in the basement somewhere, but I'll bet they be good that way, too.
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