"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Soups, Stews & Casseroles > Soups
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-26-2019, 06:10 PM   #1
Executive Chef
 
larry_stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 3,319
Purpose of Farro in a Pureed Soup

I was out east this past weekend ( in the country/ farmland), and stopped by a local farm to browse. We wound up buying fresh baked bread ( still steamy when ripped in half. Was a whole grain sour dough). I also picked up a butternut squash soup.
The soup was really good, so I looked at the ingredients to see what I'd need to duplicate it.

I saw there was Farro as one of the ingredients. The soup was pureed and probably strained considering how smooth and silky it was.

I've eaten farro before, not much taste but kinda carries the other ingredients .

My question is, is the farro in the soup more as a thickening ingredient than anything else? I cant see it really adding much to the flavor.

Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3931.jpg
Views:	55
Size:	55.2 KB
ID:	37548  
__________________

larry_stewart is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2019, 09:57 PM   #2
Head Chef
 
pepperhead212's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Woodbury, NJ
Posts: 1,061
It looks like that's what it is; I've seen many recipes like this that use red lentils, but a grain like farro would probably do the same thing, though it takes longer to soften. I haven't used in dishes I will purée, but obviously it works!
__________________

__________________
Dave
pepperhead212 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2019, 10:00 AM   #3
Sous Chef
 
MostlyWater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 975
that's interesting. i might try that.
__________________
IF ONLY 1/3 OF YOUR CLOTHES ARE A MISTAKE, YOU’RE AHEAD OF THE GAME.
NORA EPHRON
MostlyWater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2019, 10:20 AM   #4
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 45,798
I think farro is also a good source of protein in addition to providing body to the soup.

Also, you cannot discount the possibility that the farm had an excess of farro and decided to make soup with it to use it up. ;-)
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2019, 11:05 AM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston and Cape Cod
Posts: 10,044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I think farro is also a good source of protein in addition to providing body to the soup.

Also, you cannot discount the possibility that the farm had an excess of farro and decided to make soup with it to use it up. ;-)
Im with Andy.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2019, 12:19 PM   #6
Executive Chef
 
larry_stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 3,319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I think farro is also a good source of protein in addition to providing body to the soup.

Also, you cannot discount the possibility that the farm had an excess of farro and decided to make soup with it to use it up. ;-)
Very possible. They are a small farm and strolling through the store looks like nothing goes to waste. Although not what ai was looking for, they had a freezer full of bones and chicken feet, all kinds of lard, chicken fat ... in a fridge , goat milk products from cheese, to milk, soap .... So looks like they are very efficient with their bounty, so why not throw surplus farro in the soup, Whatever its purpose, the soup was really good and a nice consistency too .
__________________

larry_stewart is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
recipe, soup

Purpose of Farro in a Pureed Soup I was out east this past weekend ( in the country/ farmland), and stopped by a local farm to browse. We wound up buying fresh baked bread ( still steamy when ripped in half. Was a whole grain sour dough). I also picked up a butternut squash soup. The soup was really good, so I looked at the ingredients to see what I'd need to duplicate it. I saw there was Farro as one of the ingredients. The soup was pureed and probably strained considering how smooth and silky it was. I've eaten farro before, not much taste but kinda carries the other ingredients . My question is, is the farro in the soup more as a thickening ingredient than anything else? I cant see it really adding much to the flavor. 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:12 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
×