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Old 12-26-2005, 07:38 PM   #11
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Well, I talked to PeppA about this today. Apparently, they mix about a dozen eggs with some flour and dribble that into the broth as it cooks, as that's the way her g'pa liked it; he didn't like chopped hard cooked eggs and rivels. I've mentioned making this the way it's "supposed" to be made, and PeppA told me straight off the bat that she wouldn't touch it.

I guess this is just going to be one of those things we're not going to agree on, so I'm going to drop it.
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Old 12-26-2005, 08:04 PM   #12
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Allen, coming from a guy who lives next to the largest Amish population, it's important to remember that our Amish friends work and live in their own world. If they call something chowder, it's chowder. No arguments. I'll defer to Corinne, tho. She seems to have a good handle on Amish recipes. By the way, I've never tasted an Amish dish I didn't like!
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Old 12-26-2005, 10:29 PM   #13
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I live near PA Amish country and around here this is called chicken corn soup. Keep in mind there are as many ways to make it as there are cooks . Think chicken noodle soup made from scratch. You make chicken broth as you normally do. Obviously you add lots of corn kernals (not creamed) and fresh off the cob is wonderful. I add diced potatoes and no noodles but some use noodles or rivels instead of potatoes. I also add finely chopped onion and celery as well as parsley to the finished soup. Chopped hard cooked egg is essential. If someone wants a recipe I can hunt for one. I don't use a recipe, it is something you just make.
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Old 12-27-2005, 10:52 AM   #14
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I guess I'm not voicing my thoughts on this one very clearly.

I can get along with calling it "Chowder".

My major gripes are that PeppA and her mom seem to break all the rules that I've used when they make this dish. I've cooked a lot of Cajun in the past, and have become addicted to having just about all of my foods caramelized, and deglazing the pan when I make the sauce/broth has been ingrained into me since I went to school.

When they cook this dish, they don't saute anything, just throw raw chicken into water with a little bullion and canned corn (which I can detect a funny aftertaste in), bring that to a boil, then add in what they call "dribbles", which is a mixture of scrambled eggs with a little flour. They rarely use salt, to cut down on MIL's sodium (although she adds a lot of salt once it hits her plate). No onions, celery, garlic, etc.

When I make chicken soup (like last night), I start with onions, celery, salt, freshly-ground black pepper, garlic, paprika, thyme, and sage, and saute that. Then, I add the picked and chopped roast chicken, and stir that around a bit, then add about 2 qt of my strong homemade chicken stock. I check for salt last, and add more if needed. I did rice for the starch, as PeppA doesn't like frozen egg noodles. I cooked the rice separately, and treated it like gumbo, adding plain rice to the bowl, then ladling soup over it.

I will readily recognize that I have several biases here, towards food that I grew up eating, and to foods that are more "gourmet", which comes from my training and work experience. I also recognize that there aren't any "rules" when it comes to cooking. You cook what you like.

That apparently is my major crux. I don't really like what PeppA and her Mom like. At first, I was putting up with it, and forcing myself to eat stuff that I just wasn't happy with. Now, however, I've reached my limit, and would just rather not eat at all instead of eating something that looks like a large mass of scrambled eggs in water.

I apologize to everyone, as I should have posted this on the "Venting" thread.
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Old 12-27-2005, 12:39 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenMI
One question: Do you think I could substitute store-bought, frozen, Spatzle for the rivels?
Sorry I didn't get bsck to this sooner! Yes, I think you could--they'll just be a bit bigger than rivels.
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Old 12-27-2005, 07:27 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenMI
Editted to add: Corinne, you mentioned seasoning with salt and pepper. How about other seasonings? I usually season a chicken soup with thyme, sage, paprika, and garlic. Would these be authentic? I've heard that most Pennsylvania Dutch cooking, while good and hearty, does not always have a lot of seasonings.
Allen - I think you are so right - PA Dutch Food doesn't have a lot of seasonings. Are you all familiar with PA Dutch Chicken Pot Pie? Chicken broth, potatoes, saffron, home made "pot pie squares", cut up cooked chicken & not much else. I love it! Total comfort food.
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Old 01-06-2006, 06:30 PM   #17
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I am at this thread!

Yep - I live close enough to Lancaster that we visit quite often and there is an Amish run Farmers Market in my home town. THe chicken corn soup and pot pie are just like Corinne describes.

I think it may be one of those things you grew up with because I always have the urge to mention to the people who work there that both would be much better with a healthy dose of onion, garlic, etc etc etc.

Nevertheless, I do like creamy corn chowder and pot pie with lots of seasoning and veggies and none of those square pasta-y things!

Definitely a case of different strokes..... and Corinne, I will be in Newport next month, if you would like me to bring a "care package" to drop off for you I will!

Alexa

Who - calls all sorts of things "chowda" ... must have something to do with growing up in Maine!
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Old 01-06-2006, 08:25 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caliloo
I am at this thread!

Definitely a case of different strokes..... and Corinne, I will be in Newport next month, if you would like me to bring a "care package" to drop off for you I will!
Alexa, How sweet are you? I believe I will take you up on your offer if it's not to inconvenient for you. Hubby or I can meet you near one of the RT 95 exits on your way thru. (I assume you will take 95 to get up here.)

I'll be looking for things like:
Sweet Bologna (sliced)
Unique Splits Pretzels
Cope's dried corn (canned)
TastyKake TastyKlairs

That's just right off the top of my head. PABaker, what have I missed?


Alexa, would you like to email me at
corinne@macrobyte.net & we can figure out the details?

Thank you so much!!! Everyone always says how great DC people - I'm gonna have to jump on that bandwagon!
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Old 01-06-2006, 10:24 PM   #19
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Corrine, I'm not PA Baker, but do you eat butcher bologna, hog maw or scrapple? Pepper cabbage or chow chow?You might want to buy a meat slicer (I got a cheap one at Harbor Freight tools). Unless you like you sweet bologna very thin, you could use one of those to slice off what you need off the piece as you need it. Depending on your favorite brand, some like Baum's, Kunzler's, and Seltzer's come vacuum sealed (still needs refrigeration). If you are interested in getting that much, I could check how much a whole piece weighs since I work in a Weis Markets deli part-time.
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Old 01-07-2006, 11:17 AM   #20
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I have top chime in on this one also, though I'm not familiar with this particular soup. But I am familiar with Chowders. And yes, the term chowder was derived from the French word, chaudiere, which means cauldron. These pots wer used not only for teh chunky soup mixtures, but also for stew, and pottages as well. There is really little difference between stew and chowders. There are many recipes that are interchangably reffered to as stew or chowder, depending on who you talk to. The meaning has been blurred. Also, Chowders don't have to be creamy, but can be broth based, such as Manhattan-style Clam Chowder. The famous Native American Corn Soup is actually a chowder as well.

The classic chowder contains chunks of protein and vegetables, usually combined with a starch such as corn, ribbles, potato, etc. I have to think that whether or not a chowder contained seafood depended on where the dish was being made. Certainly, if the dish was prepared in any of the seashore towns of France, they would have included things from the sea. But France is a large country. I would think that inland areas would have used chicken, pork, and game in there versions as seafood wasn't as easily obtained.

And the "Dutch" in Pensylvania Dutch comes from the Germanic settlers of the region, the Doitche. Locals had a hard time pronouncing the German name by which they called themselves and so it became known as Dutch.

Oh, and just so I don't seem ungrateful, the soup recipes on this thread look very good. I will be trying them and have copied some to the appropriate folder on my PC. Thanks.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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