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Old 09-18-2010, 01:00 PM   #11
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I save the meat. No it's not great for chicken salad, but if you toss it in with peppers onions hot sauce salsa and cheese etc etc, you can get a dish of enchiladas out of it. Or maybe some quesadillas, or a quick soup of some sort. I just don't throw food away if I can find a use that is reasonable.
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Old 09-19-2010, 04:25 PM   #12
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I use the method Andy mentioned--cook the chicken in the water with the veggies, and when the chicken is just done, I pull it out of the pot, take the meat from the bones, and reserve the meat for another use. The bones and skin go back in the pot for a couple more hours.

I cut the raw chicken into pieces before I start--the chicken cooks more quickly.
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Old 09-19-2010, 06:41 PM   #13
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I made the most bestest "lol" homemade chicken noodle soup. I probably took the long road, but it helped me learn a lot. I have made it before, but I used some wisdom from here and from some other blogs during the process. This is what I ended up doing.

1. I took a small carcass from the freezer from a bird I roasted in the near past. carcass being very small.
2. I bought a package of chicken parts "came with the breasts, legs, and thighs basically".
3. Put these "MINUS the 2 BREASTS" in a pan and added the following: carrots, onions, Parsnips with whole cloves poked into them, red onions, celery, bay leaves, salt and peppercorns.
4. I filled the pan with water. I think I might of filled it to the 8/9 quart mark
5. Brought to a boil
6. Put back down to simmer and cooked with cover on for a good 2 hours.
7. Cooked with cover off for another 2-3 hours. This is where it's suppose to reduce and darken and intensify.
8. strained and cooled off - put in refrigerator
9. took layer of fat off the best I could this morning.

PART TWO: The soup.

1. Put oil in pan and put chopped onions in for a few minutes. Seared the 2 chicken breasts. Filled with part stock from night before and part water. Brought to boil and brought down to a high simmer for 1/2 hour. Took chicken off and put bones back in. kept on simmer with cover on for awhile and than eventually took cover off and kept it simmering for another few hours " goal ......more broth for later".

2. Back to soup.....Chopped up potatoes and carrots and onions. Put in pan. Covered with the broth made from the night before. Brought to boil and cooked until all was soft.
3. Added Orzo and let cook
4. Added small amount of frozen peas and corn and the cooked chicken pieces.

added spices along the way too long salt, pepper, thyme, parsley!!.
Had to add more of the broth from the night before as I put too much stuff into the pot and the broth wasn't high enough. : ).
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Old 09-19-2010, 06:46 PM   #14
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ahh boiled chicken from the soup. A not so fond memory from my childhood. It has no texture or flavor. I would just leave it in the soup or use it as baby food for any infants in the house
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Old 09-19-2010, 08:18 PM   #15
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ok forgot something with my steps and forgot picture.

I made the most bestest "lol" homemade chicken noodle soup. I probably took the long road, but it helped me learn a lot. I have made it before, but I used some wisdom from here and from some other blogs during the process. This is what I ended up doing.

1. I took a small carcass from the freezer from a bird I roasted in the near past. carcass being very small.
2. I bought a package of chicken parts "came with the breasts, legs, and thighs basically".
3. Put these "MINUS the 2 BREASTS" in a pan and added the following: carrots, onions, Parsnips with whole cloves poked into them, red onions, celery, bay leaves, salt and peppercorns.
4. I filled the pan with water. I think I might of filled it to the 8/9 quart mark
5. Brought to a boil
6. Put back down to simmer and cooked with cover on for a good 2 hours.
7. Cooked with cover off for another 2-3 hours. This is where it's suppose to reduce and darken and intensify.
8. strained and cooled off - put in refrigerator
9. took layer of fat off the best I could this morning.

PART TWO: The soup.

1. Put oil in pan and put chopped onions in for a few minutes. Seared the 2 chicken breasts. Filled with part stock from night before and part water. Also threw in a little of each "carrot, onion, celery, bok choy, broccoli, salt and pepper. Brought to boil and brought down to a high simmer for 1/2 hour. Took chicken off and put bones back in. kept on simmer with cover on for awhile and than eventually took cover off and kept it simmering for another few hours " goal ......more broth for later".

2. Back to soup.....Chopped up potatoes and carrots and onions. Put in pan. Covered with the broth made from the night before. Brought to boil and cooked until all was soft.
3. Added Orzo and let cook
4. Added small amount of frozen peas and corn and the cooked chicken pieces.

added spices along the way too long salt, pepper, thyme, parsley!!.
Had to add more of the broth from the night before as I put too much stuff into the pot and the broth wasn't high enough. : ). Especially since some of it boiled off from cooking the potatoes, carrots, pasta etc. I cut everything up real small since that is how I like it.
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Old 09-19-2010, 09:34 PM   #16
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In Asian culture, any broth made with bones by which collagen is extracted is considered very healthy and is often referred to as "soup of the gods". To get the most collagen and nutrients from the bones, crack them and add a bit of acidic food such as celery. The broth will taste richer and have a better mouth feel as well.

There are a thousand different ways to make a great broth, and everyone has a favorite. I would say that most of them a perfectly valid. Here's how I do mine. It gives me tender and flavorful meat, and a rich and healthy broth.

Purchase one whole chicken. Bone and skin it. Fry the skin in a dry pan until browned and crispy and throw it into a pot with a quart of water. add the bones and a stalk of sliced celery to the water, with any meat still sticking to it. Bring to a boil and then cover and simmer over low heat until the broth has reduced by about half.

Remove from the heat and strain into a bowl. Refrigerate over night. The fat will float to the top and harden. This makes it easy to remove. When ready to make soup, reheat the broth and add your veggies, typically, carrot, onion, and celery. Some people add frozen peas and/or other veggies. Celery root is great in chicken soup. Chives is also a great addition. Season with garlic, salt, pepper, and onion to taste. I like to add a bit of thyme as well. When the veggies are nearly cooked, add the noodles, or rice, or barley, whatever you like in your soup. For a treat, make up some biscuit dough for dumplings If you are making dumplings, place spoonfuls of the dough into the soup and cover. Cook at a rapid boil for about seven minutes. Dice the chicken meat into half-inch cubes and saute' in a bit of butter until lightly browned. Put the soup into serving bowls and evenly distribute the chicken meat between them. Then everyone gets a wonderful broth with tender and succulent chicken meat, great veggies, and healthy noodles (I make my own from whole wheat, egg, salt, and water), nutritios pearl barley, or brown rice. And who can resist those wnderful dumplings if that's the route you take. Jsut remove the dumplings to a seperate bowl when they are done to keep them from getting soggy.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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