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Old 01-02-2018, 06:20 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by skilletlicker View Post
Thanks. Sounds great. Can't remember seeing lamb neck in the store. In the American South similar things are done with pork neck bones. Will try it with barley and cabbage.
Lambs necks - you may need to go to a proper butcher rather than the meat counter in the supermarket. Otherwise you might be able to order it from a supermarket's meat buyer.
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Old 01-02-2018, 06:40 AM   #12
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Sounds delish Cake, will certainly have to try it. Like others mentioned we don't see lamb neck at the butcher's but maybe beef neck I could get. My mom used to make Beef Barely Soup but I have no idea of her recipe.

Also I don't think our barley needs to be soaked overnight - Stuff I have can cook up in an hour, but that's only a slight adjustment. Getting hungry just thinking about it! Been a long time since I have had any.

Thanks!
Your butcher is there to serve YOU, not the other way round. S/he may not have what you want in stock because s/he thinks there is no call for it. Order it and if he won't get it in for you find another butcher!

My local butcher even supplied me with a joint of meat cut in the French style of butchery. He didn't turn a hair when I asked him if he could do it - I think he enjoyed the challenge! I wouldn't go in on Saturday am when the shop is heaving with people if I wanted something special. Choose a quiet day. If you've got a good butcher use him or lose him. You get what you pay for and the better the quality of the meat the less you have to buy so it really does work out more economical.

I don't buy supermarket meat. I like to know where it's come from, how long it's been "hung" and if the slaughter house looked after the animals properly before the "coup de grace". My butcher has his own slaughter house and can tell you exactly which farm the meat you're buying came from. One of his slaughtermen went to work for a large, industrial slaughter house (for more money). After about a month he asked for his old job back because he was so upset by the way the animals were treated in the big slaughter house.
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Old 01-02-2018, 09:55 AM   #13
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I'm in a southern Ontario farming community and my wife is from another an hour or so away. So we're no stranger to the butcher, farmers market,etc.
I know people that like lamb no problem but aside from sheep farmers that fill there own freezer I've never seen it as a main stream popular meat choice. Special Christmas dinner sometimes it shows up. But chicken,beef and pork even turkey are the staples.

I think in Europe lamb is a much more popular meat and a lot of the older generations adapted old country recipies. We should remember if you look back in cooking history let's say Italian for example what part of Italy you came from showed the variation in the dish. There were no supermarkets so they used what they locally had from Shepard, wild herbs, etc. So who knows if we could bring back a 300 year old Italian lady and take her to a grocery store who knows what she'd create. It's good to be rooted in cooking but his is scotch broth a food that sustained them so they used what they had. That's why they used the neck most times now it's minced or in scrap. Lotsbofnpeople use a nice roast beef to make soup now but the old timers would have used necks, tails, shank, bones to get that one more meal. As mentioned above some Need turnip some USA used pork because hey used what they had.

Also demand controls price. They chicken is the most common meat choice in North America I believe. But when I find 5lbs of beef roast for $28.48 and a 22lbs turkey or $19.75lbs, the choice is economically motivated. Therefore poultry stays the most bought meat. Usually when I look chicken and pork are the most cost effective choices.
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Old 01-02-2018, 10:06 AM   #14
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Ok I went off the rails of this conversation my head gets carried away sorry.
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Old 01-02-2018, 11:36 AM   #15
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No Kevin, it's all right - well said!

We rarely have lamb on the shelves in the store from local farmers (either Ontario or Quebec). When we do, as Kevin says, it is extremely pricey. I was watching a Jamie Oliver program once as he was going on about what an economical cut of meat... yadda yadda -

the recipe sounded really yummy so I checked out our meat counter - it was there except it would have cost me about $30 Cdn just for the meat for 4 people. (I think it was Osso Bucco but not sure). Even at that there was hardly any actual meat on the bone, not like was being shown. Plus the fact he was serving two/three portions per person.

Where I am living at the moment there is only one actual butcher within an hours drive to me. I have found that many farmers butcher and sell their meat right from home (and yes, they are government inspected). But it almost by word of mouth to find them.

I'm looking for them. I don't mind the extra expense when it is not something |I would normally have.

and yes, Mad Cook, our grocery store butchers will bring in almost anything you ask for - but again - you pay the price. for the price I'd rather find a farmer's butcher shop... I'm still looking.
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Old 01-02-2018, 08:24 PM   #16
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No Kevin, it's all right - well said!

We rarely have lamb on the shelves in the store from local farmers (either Ontario or Quebec). When we do, as Kevin says, it is extremely pricey. I was watching a Jamie Oliver program once as he was going on about what an economical cut of meat... yadda yadda -

the recipe sounded really yummy so I checked out our meat counter - it was there except it would have cost me about $30 Cdn just for the meat for 4 people. (I think it was Osso Bucco but not sure). Even at that there was hardly any actual meat on the bone, not like was being shown. Plus the fact he was serving two/three portions per person.

Where I am living at the moment there is only one actual butcher within an hours drive to me. I have found that many farmers butcher and sell their meat right from home (and yes, they are government inspected). But it almost by word of mouth to find them.

I'm looking for them. I don't mind the extra expense when it is not something |I would normally have.

and yes, Mad Cook, our grocery store butchers will bring in almost anything you ask for - but again - you pay the price. for the price I'd rather find a farmer's butcher shop... I'm still looking.
I find Jamie Oliverís lamb recipes can be replicated with beef. Stronger red meat carryís it nicely. Pork is sweeter.
Have you found or tried the crackling recipes? They do common oxtail etc. Uncommon cuts in our mainstream meat services. We get whole steers butchered but Iíve never been offered beef cheeks or oxtail from them and until more recently so I may be asking on our next kill.
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