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Old 01-02-2014, 06:52 PM   #21
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The Chesapeake Bay is a big area and oysters from different parts of it taste different. Here near the mouth of the Bay, oysters are more briny because they're nearer to the ocean. And oysters from the rivers are less briny and more sweet.

I'm not an oyster fan but I've lived here long enough to learn this much
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Old 01-02-2014, 07:34 PM   #22
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I cannot wait to try this recipe! Copied and pasted!

Thanks, Steve!
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Old 01-02-2014, 08:11 PM   #23
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Where does one usually find shucked oysters?
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Old 01-02-2014, 08:21 PM   #24
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Where does one usually find shucked oysters?
Here, some fish markets and supermarkets carry them. You can also order them online: https://www.google.com/search?q=Wher...hucked+oysters
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Old 01-02-2014, 08:44 PM   #25
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I've been buying fresh and shucking them my self.
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Old 01-02-2014, 09:24 PM   #26
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So, shucked oysters would be fresh? Or would they be frozen? I assume they are raw, is that correct?
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Old 01-02-2014, 09:29 PM   #27
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Yes, they're fresh and raw, at least the ones I've seen.
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Old 01-02-2014, 09:30 PM   #28
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Where does one usually find shucked oysters?
I've almost always bought shucked oysters in the supermarket. If the supermarket doesn't have them, dedicated fish sellers almost surely will. The problem is that they only appear for very brief periods in December and January, and then, POOF! They are gone.

Over the years I've lived in Wisconsin, Illinois, Texas, Nevada, and Minnesota, and have never had problems finding them around the Christmas-New Years week. But I don't know if availability is the same in Canadian supermarkets.

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So, shucked oysters would be fresh? Or would they be frozen? I assume they are raw, is that correct?
They are fresh and raw.
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Old 01-02-2014, 09:32 PM   #29
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Those online ones cost enough that a batch of Steve's stew would cost >$40, just for the oysters. Is that the sort of price range that is normal?
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Old 01-02-2014, 09:35 PM   #30
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Blue Points maybe or Chesapeake?
Definitely not Blue Points. Blue Points are the most common that we get in Minnesota. The ones I enjoyed.... I want to say they were called "saint" something. But I don't remember. When the waiter rattled off the names (before tasting them) I wasn't paying close attention.
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Steve Kroll's Oyster Stew Having this hearty soup on New Year's Day has been a tradition in our family for a number of years. If you are unable to find bottled clam juice, you can substitute chicken or vegetable stock. [SIZE=3][B]Oyster Stew[/B][/SIZE] [B]Ingredients:[/B] [LIST] [*]2 pints shucked oysters in their liquor [*]8 tbsp butter [*]1/2 cup flour [*]2 shallots, finely chopped [*]4 stalks celery, finely chopped [*]1 clove garlic, minced [*]1/2 cup dry white wine [*]1 8 oz bottle clam juice [*]3 cups half & half [*]2 or 3 good shakes of Tabasco [*]1/2 tsp old bay seasoning [*]1/8 tsp ground nutmeg [*]salt and pepper [/LIST] [B]Preparation:[/B] [LIST=1] [*]Strain the oysters, reserving the liquor. Rinse the oysters under cold water and set aside. [*]Melt the butter in a small dutch oven over medium heat. Stir in the flour to make a roux. Cook the roux for 5 minutes, stirring frequently. [*]Add the shallots, celery, and garlic, and cook for a few minutes longer, until the vegetables are tender. Continue stirring the entire time. [*]Add the white wine, clam juice, and reserved oyster liquor; stir to make a paste. Cook for a couple of minutes to burn off the alcohol. Gradually add the half and half, a cup at a time. Continue stirring and don't let the mixture come to a boil. Reduce the heat to low. [*]Add Tabasco, old bay, and nutmeg. Stir in oysters and cook gently over low heat until the oysters are cooked through and beginning to curl around the edges. [*]Season with salt and pepper to taste. [/LIST] [IMG]http://i892.photobucket.com/albums/ac125/SteveKroll/oyster_stew_zpsa2e28e40.jpg[/IMG] 3 stars 1 reviews
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