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Old 11-06-2004, 03:45 PM   #11
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I've used their chicken stock. When compared to the other canned broths available, this is excellent. When viewed from a perspective of the real deal... it's still pretty horrible.

If you're pressed for time... hey, you do what you gotta do.
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Old 11-06-2004, 04:18 PM   #12
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Let's see your stock recipe, scott.
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Old 11-07-2004, 01:27 PM   #13
 
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I just saw the tv ad on this stock today for the first time. I will have to check it out! I am sure it is good.
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Old 11-08-2004, 02:07 AM   #14
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Here's the short version, mudbug.

Roast your bird.
Separate the meat
Toss everything remaining in a large stockpot
Cover with water
Bring to boil
Simmer for 5-7 hours
Strain
Add a pinch or two of salt
Reduce by 3/4 while skimming/discarding scum
Cool quickly
Refrigerate
Remove layer of fat
Freeze in portions.

Sure it's a pain in the butt, but the silky mouthfeel you get from the collagen/gelatin... the sweet toasty maillard compounds from the roasting... no cannned/boxed product comes close.
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Old 11-08-2004, 08:55 AM   #15
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Chicken stock for arthritis

Scott, did you know that your stock is supposed to be good for arthritis? I don't suffer, (thank heavens!) so I can't personally attest to this, but I have been told on good authority that this is so. Apparently it helps replace material in worn joints!
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Old 11-08-2004, 12:54 PM   #16
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like scott123 (and I'm sure, many others) I routinely make and freeze chicken stock.

I'd like to pass on 2 tips

> if you own a slow cooker, it is perfect for making stock. Unlike "top of the stove", there is no scum to skim off. Dump in your chicken pieces to fill about 2/3 full, add water (and whatever else you use - unlike scott, I do add salt at the beginning) to cover by about 1", turn to low, cover and walk away. I do this in the evening and strain the next AM or in the AM before work and strain sometime that evening so my guestimate of total cooking time ranges 8-12 hours. I wouldn't do this in a stock pot on the stove because of the safety issue.

> I routinely add a small amount of distilled white vinegar (supermarket variety) to the water. Lightly acidulating the water helps dissolve calcium and other mineral salts in bone into the stock. I add 2 tsp white vinegar per quart of water. If you try this, please don't use any other kind of vinegar or acid b/c the long, slow simmer will concentrate the flavor and give the stock an "off" taste. If you've never done this, try it and you'll see the difference in the bones after the stock is finished.
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Old 11-08-2004, 12:59 PM   #17
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subfuscpersona, I use apple cider vinegar in my stock and have never noticed an "off" taste. I did not realize that any vinegar would do, so I may try white to see if there is a difference. Would you know...does the vinegar help to gel the stock? I suspected it might, since it is leaching all the minerals out of the bones. Just an errant thought...hope you know the answer.
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Old 11-08-2004, 01:46 PM   #18
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i just spotted them in my grocery store. thought about getting some on payday
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Old 11-08-2004, 01:48 PM   #19
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thanks, scott and subfus..etc.

Think I'll go the stockpot route next time I make stock. Had not thought of doing it that way, but why not? Guess I will also leave out the onions, celery, etc. that I used to throw in for a change as well.
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Old 11-08-2004, 02:08 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
subfuscpersona, I use apple cider vinegar in my stock and have never noticed an "off" taste. I did not realize that any vinegar would do, so I may try white to see if there is a difference. Would you know...does the vinegar help to gel the stock? I suspected it might, since it is leaching all the minerals out of the bones. Just an errant thought...hope you know the answer.
Just once, when I was out of distilled white vinegar, I used some other kind of vinegar (I honestly forget what kind) instead. The stock had an "off" or "sweetish" taste (adjectives are so imprecise!) - anyway, it didn't taste right and I had to throw it out. If you don't experience the problem with cider vinegar then that's great but I've stuck with distilled white vinegar ever since and never had the problem repeat itself. The long, slow simmer is going to concentrate any flavor in your acidulating agent into the stock. Distilled white vinegar is essentially tasteless and works best for me.

re does the vinegar help to gel the stock? Yes and no. Gelatin comes from the connective tissue at the "ends" of joint bones well as the bone itself. When I acidulate the water I do notice that this connective tissue (I sure hope this is the right word :) ) is totally gone and the bones are softened (they'll bend before they break) and/or the bones show pitting so the vinegar helps by dissolving gelatin that otherwise would remain "locked" in the bone. But it's also going to depend on how much gelatin was there to start with.
I find if I make stock from a poultry carcass the stock is not as gelled (or may not gell at all) as when I make it from fresh bones and meat. I personally don't care whether whether my chicken stock gells as long as it tastes good.

I learned the vinegar trick decades ago from some long-gone cookbook but, given my obsessive-compulsive nature :D I wanted to understand what was going on so, with some dedicated 'net searching I found this. It helped me understand why vinegar has the effect it does.
Quote:
For 80 years, it has been repeatedly confirmed that bone responds to an acid load by dissolving its basic buffering mineral salts...Bone is sensitive to small changes in pH...[in addition to calcium] bone also contains substantial amounts of sodium, potassium, magnesium, citrate, and carbonate. Half of these are located on the bone crystalloid surface and in the hydration shell of bone. These buffering minerals are available for rapid exchange with the general extracellular fluid...
source: Acid-Alkaline Balance and Its Effect on Bone Health
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