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Old 11-27-2005, 10:01 AM   #1
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Turkey Soup

I hauled out the turkey carcass yesterday, pulled out the oranges I had stuffed in it, left the onions and garlic, and put it in a big pot of water to cook along with all those wonderful congealed juices in the bottom of the pan. After it came to a boil, I turned down the heat and let it simmer on med/low all afternoon, skimming the top occasionally. Then I removed the bones and other gras deux, turned the heat up to medium, added a few bay leaves and let it boil gently until it was reduced by half. I then strained it, picking out a few of the tired turkey pieces for my dog, and discarding the rest.
Then I started adding the leftovers...corn casserole with butter, cream cheese & cheddar...sweet-sour green beans with bacon...brussels sprouts with bacon...and chopped turkey.
When that came back to a gentle boil, I added some heavy-duty Amish egg noodles and a slurry of flour and water to thicken the broth. I didn't have to add any seasoning, because everything that went in was seasoned already.
It's a beautiful soup...wish I could share it with you all.


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Old 11-27-2005, 11:32 AM   #2
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That sounds soooo good. I never thought of adding in side-dish leftovers in my turkey soup. Don't know if I'll get the chance as my youngest daughter adores this recipe and would be heart-broken if I didn't make it.

Boil the carcass in biggest soup pot. When it has cooked for several hours to extract all of that great flavor, and the nutrition from the bone marrow, remove that carcass and strain to remove any tiny bones. Get all of the good meat from the carcass and add to the broth, along with two quatered onions, a couple stalks of sliced celery, an a cup of brown rice. Optionally, I will add a half-cup of pearl barley. Season all with salt and pepper.

On my own, I will heat a small pot-full and make some biscuit-style sage-seasoned dumplings in the boiling soup and eat it as a single searving. Yum.

This year, in the small pot, I'm going to add some of the left-over sides as inspired by you. Thanks for the idea.

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Old 11-27-2005, 03:22 PM   #3
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That does sound good. I wish I could taste it!

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Old 11-27-2005, 04:33 PM   #4
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I found that what really enhanced the flavor of the soup was reducing the broth by half. I've never tried that before, and didn't realize what a difference it would make.
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Old 11-27-2005, 05:09 PM   #5
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The dilemma always to me is should I roast the carcass before turning it into stock?

Usually I do, roasting it with an onion, carrot and a stalk of celery.

Then I simmer it for several hours.

What we do next, I am generally in charge of the stock, varies.

Can always add a mirepoix, some reserved turkey meat, herbs and spices with some noodles and have a very comforting dish.

Or, well, as with any stock the sky is the limit.

Turkey is OK, but it is the leftover sandwiches, and finally the soup, that are the meals I am most thankful for.
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