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Old 12-31-2007, 09:10 AM   #1
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What cheese do you use for French Onion Soup?

authentic French onion soup? I am thinking gruyere cheese? I'm not a huge fan of REALLY strong cheeses depending on the cheese. What is gruyere like? thanks!

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Old 12-31-2007, 09:17 AM   #2
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authentic French onion soup? I am thinking gruyere cheese? I'm not a huge fan of REALLY strong cheeses depending on the cheese. What is gruyere like? thanks!
I just bought gruyere cheese for french onion soup - it was $13 a pound! I heard you can use swiss cheese too - and someone even told me mozzarella, too. I like gruyere so that is what I bought. I don't think it is too strong but everyone's taste is different.
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Old 12-31-2007, 09:22 AM   #3
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Gruyere is traditional. Emmental (Swiss) is also a possibility.

Bottom line - whatever you like. (not cottage cheese)
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Old 12-31-2007, 09:24 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Gruyere is traditional. Emmental (Swiss) is also a possibility.

Bottom line - whatever you like. (not cottage cheese)
I LOVE Emmental swiss! yum!
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Old 12-31-2007, 09:41 AM   #5
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I always use a combo of Swiss and Parm.

Yummy!
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Old 12-31-2007, 10:02 AM   #6
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Gruyere is the best. Swiss and even Provolone work well too.
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Old 12-31-2007, 10:10 AM   #7
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thin sliced Edam will work too.
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Old 12-31-2007, 11:11 AM   #8
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I am with Andy on this one. Unless onion soup police is coming for diner use whatever you like. I can't even get any of the fancy cheeses, so I use what's available.
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Old 12-31-2007, 11:59 AM   #9
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Gruyere, as has been mentioned, is traditionally used on French onion soup. It's a delicious cheese. Firm and a bit grainy with a nice nutty flavor. It's one of the cheeses Buck and I use for our New Year's Eve fondue. Even though it may seem expensive, you should only need a few ounces of it for 4 servings of your soup. The cheese melts and browns up beautifully.
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Old 12-31-2007, 12:31 PM   #10
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Actually.... if you want to get really technical, it's Comte... the French version of Gruyere (which, BTW is also "Swiss Cheese," as it is from Switzerland, along with Emmenthal).

However, pretty much anything labeled "Swiss Cheese" that isn't processed will work. We've used Jarlsberg (the Norwegian version of "Swiss Cheese") a few times, and it was fine, too.
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