"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Soups, Stews & Casseroles > Stews
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-23-2005, 09:25 AM   #1
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
Frogmore Stew

Looks like this one is a little late in the season, as corn seems to be done here.

Frogmore Stew
Makes: 8 servings

6 qt water
c Old Bay Seasoning
2 # new red potatoes
2 # hot smoked sausage links, cut into 2” pieces
12 ears corn - husked, cleaned and quartered
4 # large fresh shrimp, unpeeled

Bring water and Old Bay Seasoning to boil in a large stockpot. Add potatoes and cook for 15 minutes. Add sausage and cook for 5 minutes more. Add corn and cook for another 5 minutes. Stir in the shrimp and cook until shrimp are pink, about 5 minutes. Drain immediately and serve.

__________________

__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2005, 10:20 AM   #2
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
That's a great recipe, Allen...we cooked that last summer. I added some little boiler onions too, and served it with good bread to mop up the broth.
One can get good corn at the grocery just about any time of the year any more, so don't let the season stop you from making it.
__________________

__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2005, 10:53 AM   #3
Head Chef
 
auntdot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,418
When I saw the ingredients it reminds me of many of the ingredients in a New England lobster boil. Sounds great.
__________________
auntdot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2005, 10:56 AM   #4
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
It actually reminds me of a N'awlins Crawfish Boil.

I know that corn is pretty much available on the cob year round, but I prefer to do a lot of seasonal cooking, especially when fresh local produce is available.
__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2005, 06:05 PM   #5
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Scotland
Posts: 2,977
AllenMI
I'm curious.... why is the dish called 'Frogmore'?

It made me smile as it is the name of one of the royal houses in Windsor Gt Park near Windsor Castle. It's where Queen Victoria and Prince Albert are buried. Thought you might like to see the place.

http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/page558.asp
__________________
Ishbel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2005, 07:35 PM   #6
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
Honestly, I have no idea why it's called that. I think this is a "Low Country" recipe, for the coastal region of South Carolina.
__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2005, 08:28 PM   #7
Executive Chef
 
Piccolina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,319
Send a message via AIM to Piccolina Send a message via MSN to Piccolina Send a message via Yahoo to Piccolina
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
AllenMI
I'm curious.... why is the dish called 'Frogmore'?

It made me smile as it is the name of one of the royal houses in Windsor Gt Park near Windsor Castle. It's where Queen Victoria and Prince Albert are buried. Thought you might like to see the place.
When I first saw the title it made me think of the sort of names places have in the Harry Potter books (lol, or so I gather, I've never read any them ).

Quote:
c Old Bay Seasoning
What is "Old Bay Seasoning"?
__________________
Jessica

"The most indispensable ingredient of all good home cooking: love, for those you are cooking for" ~ Sophia Loren
Piccolina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2005, 11:05 PM   #8
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
Old Bay Seasoning is a seasoning mix commonly used with seafood. It's sold in a blue and yellow can or tin here in the US. I just got my can out, and the ingredients are:

Celery Salt
Spices (includes Mustard, Red Pepper, Black Pepper, Bay leaves, Cloves, Allspice, Ginger, Mace, Cardamom, Cinnamon)
Paprika

I just googled a copycat recipe, here it is:

Old Bay Seasoning
Ingredients:
1 Tbsp. Celery Seed
1 Tbsp Whole Black Peppercorns
6 Bay Leaves
1/2 tsp. Whole Cardamom
1/2 tsp. Mustard Seed
4 Whole Cloves
1 tsp. Sweet Hungarian Paprika
1/4 tsp. Mace

Preparation Instructions:
In a spice grinder or small food processor, combine all of the ingredients. Grind well and store in a small glass jar.
__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2005, 05:58 AM   #9
Executive Chef
 
Piccolina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,319
Send a message via AIM to Piccolina Send a message via MSN to Piccolina Send a message via Yahoo to Piccolina
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenMI
Old Bay Seasoning is a seasoning mix commonly used with seafood. It's sold in a blue and yellow can or tin here in the US. I just got my can out, and the ingredients are:

Celery Salt
Spices (includes Mustard, Red Pepper, Black Pepper, Bay leaves, Cloves, Allspice, Ginger, Mace, Cardamom, Cinnamon)
Paprika

I just googled a copycat recipe, here it is:

Old Bay Seasoning
Ingredients:
1 Tbsp. Celery Seed
1 Tbsp Whole Black Peppercorns
6 Bay Leaves
1/2 tsp. Whole Cardamom
1/2 tsp. Mustard Seed
4 Whole Cloves
1 tsp. Sweet Hungarian Paprika
1/4 tsp. Mace

Preparation Instructions:
In a spice grinder or small food processor, combine all of the ingredients. Grind well and store in a small glass jar.
Thanks so much Allen, I totally appreciate that you took the time to look that up for me! I don't think I've ever bought a prepared spice mix with all these ingredients in them, but thanks to you I now know how to recreate it (though I'd leave the cloves out, they are not my cup of tea ).
__________________
Jessica

"The most indispensable ingredient of all good home cooking: love, for those you are cooking for" ~ Sophia Loren
Piccolina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2005, 07:35 AM   #10
Executive Chef
 
marmalady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,SouthCarolina
Posts: 2,642
Here's a site that explains the history of Frogmore stew:

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...28/ai_20187696

"Low Country Cooking

The Sea Islands that hug the coastline are home to families who have lived there as long as they can remember. Their recipes for beloved Gullah dishes -- red rice, hoppin' John, okra soup, shrimp and grits, smoked mullet, collard greens, tater (sweet potato) pone and boiled peanuts in the shells -- have been passed from generation to generation. Many of these foods, looked upon as the pride of the South, actually reach back to die Motherland. And in typical African style, Low Country cooks favor one-pot meals. Sea Island kettles bubble with savory stews and lusty gumbos made from the catch of the day, garden vegetables, hot peppers and herbs. Servings of rice and warm-from-the-oven corn bread turn these hearty, comforting dishes into simple feasts. According to Gullah storyteller and founder of the Gullah-Geechee Coalition, Marquetta Goodwine, "The songs, laughter, love and sea go into the Frogmore Stew." But don't worry: The stew does not contain frogs; the name comes from the Frogmore plantation on St. Helena Island in South Carolina, where it is said the dish originated. In some parts, the dish is called St. Helena stew or Low Country boil. This regional favorite is often enjoyed served simply on paper plates at a newspaper-covered table beneath moss-hung trees. A customary table grace is said in the Gullah language, which combines English and tribal African words: "Gee we de food wa we da need dis day an ebryday."

The ocean, rivers, ponds, lakes, marshes, swamps, bays and creeks that have isolated and protected much of the Gullah culture continue to provide a wellspring of fresh fish and shellfish. Shrimp are the heart of numerous dishes; the), are especially popular served with grits. Other local offerings include shrimp), oysters, blue crab, cod, sea bass, porgy, catfish and flounder. Visit the waterways, arid you'll find fishermen mending their nets and throwing out their crab cages much as their ancestors did four centuries, ago."
__________________

__________________
marmalady is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.