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Old 11-27-2007, 02:47 AM   #11
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Here in the states stewmeat is usually sold in small chunks. I personally like to buy sirloin tip steak that's on sale and cut it into small cubes myself and use that instead. Sirloin is lower in fat and a more tender cut and will render a stew in less time but it's not exceptionally cheap unless it's on sale. At least that's been my experience for many years.
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Old 11-27-2007, 03:02 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by expatgirl View Post
Here in the states stewmeat is usually sold in small chunks. I personally like to buy sirloin tip steak that's on sale and cut it into small cubes myself and use that instead. Sirloin is lower in fat and a more tender cut and will render a stew in less time but it's not exceptionally cheap unless it's on sale. At least that's been my experience for many years.
Thanks for the explanation. Couldn't tell from the posts how the meat was presented. It is big pieces, steaks or chunks here too.
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Old 11-27-2007, 04:19 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by expatgirl View Post
Here in the states stewmeat is usually sold in small chunks. I personally like to buy sirloin tip steak that's on sale and cut it into small cubes myself and use that instead. Sirloin is lower in fat and a more tender cut and will render a stew in less time but it's not exceptionally cheap unless it's on sale. At least that's been my experience for many years.
You've done it with a chuck roast, I assume? Just my experience, having experimented with all the cheap cuts I could find, chuck was just far and above my favorite for stewing/braising. Cuts from the round, including sirloin tip and rump, would dry up on me no matter what, and always came out tougher. A chuck-based pot roast would require fingers: a round-based pot roast would require a chainsaw. Is there a trick I might've missed?

Beef stew... I'm salivating right now! I'll have to make goulash next week! Thanks for the idea!
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Old 11-27-2007, 04:27 AM   #14
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Meat pie for me!! Steak and mushroom or steak and kidney pie, or a combination of all three ingredients!! Or (an Indian) beef curry with rice. Or beef bourguignon perhaps?
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Old 11-27-2007, 12:13 PM   #15
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I just throw my stew beef in crockpot with broth and spices, when meat is done I use the broth to make gravy,put meat in gravy and serve it over egg noodles.you could always add other things to it corn,potatoes,carrots. My family is picky eaters so not much variety goes into my food. The only way to go Cheap and Easy
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Old 11-27-2007, 12:42 PM   #16
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LMJ, what I do to a sirloin tip is to cut it into cubes (against the grain if you can and at a slant), season with salt & pepper(use immediately if using salt) place cubes in a baggie with flour (prefer Wondra as it's light in texture but not necessary as regular will do) and then brown in olive or vegetable oil over medium high heat with garlic. Really it's like a stir fry as you are constantly stirring the meat around. Then it makes its own gravy and I add the rest of the ingredients when the meat is browned. Never have I had sirloin tip for stew turn tough on me. It's almost tender at that point you brown it but an additional 45 minutes to an hour with the rest of the stew ingredients will tenderize it even more. Add some Kitchen Bouquet sauce to give it a rich brown look.
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Old 11-27-2007, 12:56 PM   #17
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I also use a chuck roast cut into chunks. Saute some rings of onions in some butter until browned and remove. Dredge chunks in seasoned flour and brown. Put back onions and cover with stout beer. Cook until tender. The flour from the chunks by then will have thickened the beer into a nice gravy. Serve over rice or noodles. That's it - - - the end.
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Old 11-27-2007, 02:05 PM   #18
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it is in chunks all of this sounds sooo good =)
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Old 11-27-2007, 02:08 PM   #19
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Do I smell chili cooking?? Yum!!
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Old 11-27-2007, 05:03 PM   #20
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Hopefully not too far off the thread as stew is stew, but my aunt who had two sets of twins 4 years apart, had to really watch pennies. So she would take Sunday's leftover chuck pot roast, chopped it up and add chopped onions, garlic, and some bottled barbeque sauce and cook until just falling to smithereens and serve over hamburger buns. My goodness it was good and easy. Serve with a veggie and there's a dinner that children will eat.
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