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Old 10-21-2008, 06:15 PM   #21
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before I add the stock, I put in about 2 oz of cognac and set it ablaze - it gives the dish a delicious depth of flavor. Like others have mentioned, I use good stock, red wine, etc.

also I add 1 minced garlic clove in the last 5 minutes of cooking.
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Old 10-21-2008, 06:33 PM   #22
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Call me an heretic. I don't care. I don't flour my meat before browning. Just season good with salt and pepper, maybe some thyme. Brown over high heat in a Dutch Oven in batches. When all the meat is done, holding the meat in the bowl, pour the juices that accumulated from the par-cooked meat into the pan. Allow this to deglaze, then caramelize again. Add some high-quality stock, then the meat. Simmer until it's about an hour away from being tender.

Cut all you favorite veggies. In another pan, saute those until caramelized. You may have to do this in batches. Make sure to add a sprig of fresh rosemary and some bay leaves. As the veggies are caramelized, add them to the stew. When all the veggies are done, deglaze the pan with the broth from the stew, then pour that back in.

I really like the idea of flambeing cognac. I may have to try that next time. I also like the idea of scraping fresh corn off the cob. Make sure to get as much of the juices from the cob into the stew.
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Old 10-21-2008, 06:47 PM   #23
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Thanks, Allen, I started using fresh corn about 15 years ago and I love it.........I just hold the cob straight up over the board and scrape everything in a vertical position and then transfer into the stew pot towards the end........how do you set your pan on fire with the cognac.......serious pyromaniacs want to know........I'm, to be honest, afraid to do it........ so if you have a good technique or anyone else out there does let us know ...thanks, debs
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Old 10-21-2008, 07:20 PM   #24
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I don't know others' reasoning, but flouring the meat seems to give my stew just the right consistency without adding any thickener later.
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Old 10-21-2008, 07:50 PM   #25
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Yes i flour salt and pepper and then brown it with olive oil then start adding chopped onions , garlic chopped up, thyme, rosemary, bay leaf, beef broth and a lil water, start it cooking until meat starts to come apart with a fork, then I take the meat out add carrots potatoes, some turnips if i have them , i like to add pearl onions . while that is cooking i cut up the meat and add it back. I then take a can of beef broth and make a roux - then add that back to the pot when just about finished i add some frozen peas.

I have cut up the chuck roast ahead of time but i like to keep it whole and then cut it up. I can never make a big enough pot. It is my middle grandson favorite.
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Old 10-21-2008, 07:51 PM   #26
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Chuck roast, red wine, Worcestershire sauce, smoke flavoring, a good beef stock, bay leaves, gravy mix, and onion soup mix, and a little brown sugar. The chuck roast is cut into three or four large chunks and left in the slow cooker on low all day with all the rest of the ingredients. When it is all done, then I cube it.
For awhile I had a very good Thai beef stock that I was using, gave it a very distinctive flavoring that everyone loved.
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Old 10-21-2008, 11:31 PM   #27
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Thanks everyone! The stew turned out to be superb, just like I hoped! I bit of this and that from all your suggestions and I had just the right stew! I just wish I had posted it before I had already browned my mean. I think you are right, flouring the meat would have made the stew a better consistency. But I'll know for next time!
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Old 10-22-2008, 12:57 PM   #28
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Expatgirl, lighting a "pot" with high sides after booze has been added is indeed a challenge. I prefer to use the piezio-electric lighters with the long wand on the business end for something like that. I won't burn myself if I use one of those. I keep a few in my drawer at work anyways, as the pilots on the stove don't work.
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Old 10-22-2008, 01:14 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenOK View Post
Expatgirl, lighting a "pot" with high sides after booze has been added is indeed a challenge. I prefer to use the piezio-electric lighters with the long wand on the business end for something like that. I won't burn myself if I use one of those. I keep a few in my drawer at work anyways, as the pilots on the stove don't work.
I've seen those, Allen, thanks.........I'll give them a try.......just a bit nervous about using fire.....do you just let it burn out or do you smother the flame with a lid..........does it really add that much flavor or is it all for show?
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Old 10-22-2008, 02:45 PM   #30
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Guinness, good stock, Worcestershire.
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