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Old 01-08-2009, 09:48 AM   #61
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Originally Posted by Maverick2272 View Post
Using flower as a thickener at the end is tricky and hard to do. Instead you can use instant mashed potato flakes as a thickener or make a rue and add it in.
I prefer corn starch. Mix with some cold water, pour in. Works great, imparts zero flavor.
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Old 01-08-2009, 09:55 AM   #62
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No offense, but it is a Roux. In South Louisiana, you always add as many letters as possible to spell a work. LOL Adding it at the end is tricky, and requires additional cooking time to mix well. I also use chuck roast. Per pound it is cheaper and much better than stew meat. I guess they charge extra because of the cutting, which takes about 10 minutes. I also use turnips instead of potatoes. I cook beef stew a couple times a year, and then freeze it in portions. Potatoes, as most of you know, do not freeze well. They turn meally in stews and vegetable soup.
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Old 01-08-2009, 10:34 AM   #63
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Originally Posted by Argamemnon View Post
Can you add some flour at the end, if you decide to thicken the stew? Is it better to mix the flour with boiling water before adding it?

Second, does anyone use leeks for flavour?
I frequently use leeks in mine.

I prefer to thicken with flour. No, you can't mix the flour with boiling water. It will immediately turn into an unmanageable lump. Put a few tablespoons of flour into a high-sided bowl (I use a 2 cup measuring cup). Slowly add regular tap water stirring with a small whisk or tablespoon until it's liquid enough to stir briskly. Stop adding water and stir briskly until it's smooth and lump-free. Slowly drizzle and stir it into the stew until you almost have the desired consistancy. Cook a few minutes more. Don't overthicken, since it will thicken more during the final few minutes of cooking.
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Old 01-08-2009, 10:38 AM   #64
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BONES! Roast some bones and get as much gelatin out of them as possible in your stock pot. I really think homemade stock is what sets a good stew apart. There is no faking that flavor.
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Old 01-08-2009, 10:52 AM   #65
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Originally Posted by Argamemnon View Post
Can you add some flour at the end, if you decide to thicken the stew? Is it better to mix the flour with boiling water before adding it?

Second, does anyone use leeks for flavour?
Not advised...As others have said today, and in the past...make a roux...flour and oil...brown the flour...add some water..make a gravy of sorts...add that in for thickening and flavor.....

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Old 01-08-2009, 11:08 AM   #66
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If you are going to make a roux, make alot. 3 cups oil, 3 cups flour. Let it cool completely and put it in a jar in the fridge. That stuff keeps in the fridge forever. I love it to cook Roux Peas. They are ready in about 10 minutes.
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Old 01-08-2009, 12:44 PM   #67
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I want to make beef stew tomorrow, but I don't have stock on hand. Besides, the stock at the supermarket that I bought a few months ago contained gelatine, which is usually made of pork (I don't eat pork).....

This means that I have to make stock myself. But can I just add some meat with bones, or some marrow bones to the beef stew, instead of using stock? Thanks in advance....
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Old 01-08-2009, 01:48 PM   #68
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Originally Posted by Argamemnon View Post
the stock at the supermarket that I bought a few months ago contained gelatine, which is usually made of pork (I don't eat pork)
Does it say Pork on the can? Gelatin comes from bones, which is what creates "stock". I've had Beef and Chicken stock but I've never seen Pork stock.

If you want to avoid gelatin, then you would use "Broth" which is made from meat or vegetables, but no bones.

Adding meaty bones to a stew or soup will always improve the overall flavor. Near the end the bones are removed and any big chunks of meat are cut smaller.
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Old 01-08-2009, 02:43 PM   #69
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I always brown the meat completely before starting the stew.
I make my own sauce and among other things, I add red wine and 2 Tbsp. of beef demi-glace to make the sauce (gravy) richer and have a deep flavor. I love my beef stew and do it in the crock pot.
The other thing that makes it so good is that I always make it a day ahead and let it sit in the fridge for the flavors to meld. This is one of those things that gets better and better.

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Old 01-08-2009, 02:46 PM   #70
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Adding meaty bones to a stew or soup will always improve the overall flavor. Near the end the bones are removed and any big chunks of meat are cut smaller.
I used to do this all of the time, but I haven't lately. You just don't find beef bones the way you used to in my grocery stores anymore.
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