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Old 01-08-2009, 03:08 PM   #71
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Lots of garlic and red wine!
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Old 01-08-2009, 07:16 PM   #72
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Originally Posted by Argamemnon View Post
Sorry, I editted my message almost at the same time you answered, lol..
LOL thats OK, yes I do actually measure. For instance to thicken up a stew I will remove as much water as I can, lets say 2 cups. I will set it aside to cool enough so that it is not boiling otherwise it will be harder to work with. Then I take 2tbsp butter and 2tbsp flour for each cup of liquid I removed. The idea is to make the liquid really really thick because when you add it back into the stew the liquid still in there will thin it back out. So for me, I almost make a thick gravy out of the liquid I removed.
I used to have Wondra, which is a flour product that you can actually throw right in the stew pot to thicken and it will never clump or taste of flower, but after I used it all up I have not seen it around here. I am sure it is still out there, I just keep forgetting to look for it LOL.
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Old 01-08-2009, 07:58 PM   #73
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Originally Posted by mcnerd View Post
Does it say Pork on the can? Gelatin comes from bones, which is what creates "stock". I've had Beef and Chicken stock but I've never seen Pork stock.

If you want to avoid gelatin, then you would use "Broth" which is made from meat or vegetables, but no bones.

Adding meaty bones to a stew or soup will always improve the overall flavor. Near the end the bones are removed and any big chunks of meat are cut smaller.
It was beef stock.. it didn't say pork, but I've read that when you come across the word "gelatine", it's usually made of different bones, including pork...

Thank you for the advice...
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Old 01-08-2009, 08:00 PM   #74
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Ohhhh I roux the day I brought up a rue....
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Old 01-08-2009, 08:02 PM   #75
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Originally Posted by Maverick2272 View Post
LOL thats OK, yes I do actually measure. For instance to thicken up a stew I will remove as much water as I can, lets say 2 cups. I will set it aside to cool enough so that it is not boiling otherwise it will be harder to work with. Then I take 2tbsp butter and 2tbsp flour for each cup of liquid I removed. The idea is to make the liquid really really thick because when you add it back into the stew the liquid still in there will thin it back out. So for me, I almost make a thick gravy out of the liquid I removed.
I used to have Wondra, which is a flour product that you can actually throw right in the stew pot to thicken and it will never clump or taste of flower, but after I used it all up I have not seen it around here. I am sure it is still out there, I just keep forgetting to look for it LOL.
Thanks for the advice
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Old 01-08-2009, 08:07 PM   #76
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Originally Posted by Leolady View Post
I used to do this all of the time, but I haven't lately. You just don't find beef bones the way you used to in my grocery stores anymore.
Yes, it's sad that nowadays people don't use meaty bones anymore...in the past most dishes were cooked with meaty bones, it's delicious and can't be compared to boneless meat..
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Old 01-09-2009, 12:17 AM   #77
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And I rue the day that I believed Buddy when he spelled "roux", 'cause I repeated it.....
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Old 01-09-2009, 12:31 AM   #78
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And I rue the day that I believed Buddy when he spelled "roux", 'cause I repeated it.....
Um... just a quick tip for ya.. never never ever use my spelling!!
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Old 01-09-2009, 12:51 PM   #79
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I made it. Unfortunately, the meat wasn't good, the stew would have been so much better with better meat. I will never buy beef again, VEAL is much better in my opinion!!
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Old 01-09-2009, 11:43 PM   #80
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What cut did you use for the stew? Could you tell us your procedure and ingredients?

I find the best cuts for stew are usually the toughest, gnarliest cuts out there. Those particular muscles were really worked hard by the critter, and have a slightly stronger taste. Personally, I use either chuck, sirloin, or round steak. If you buy a roast and cut it down into pieces, you will save money as the price / pound is less than pre-packaged "stew meat".

Also, I make a point of making my own stock, usually in 2 gallon batches, then freezing the stock in ice cube trays, and storing the cubes in gallon ziplock baggies. This way, whenever I want to make a stew, I have homemade, high-quality stock, full of gelatin, which gives a good stock it's body and flavor. I don't make "pork" stock, but rather, I always keep chicken, beef, and shrimp stock on hand. As long as there is lots of cartiliage and skin in the chicken stock when I'm simmering it, LOTS of gelatin will render out. As long as I go to the Asian grocery store, I can pick up some beef knuckles, which are LOADED with cartiliage. It usually takes 24 - 36 hours for that cartiliage to break down into gelatin, but is well worth the wait. I have even been known to make a small batch of beef demi-glace if I get a really gelatin-rich batch of beef stock.
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