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Old 01-10-2009, 06:23 AM   #81
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for personal tastes I like to dredge my meat in seasoned flour first (I use a baggie for this to eliminate the cleaning__ and then immediately brown it in olive or canola oil......if my stew needs further thickening then I add more later but usually I don't have to...one thing that really looks nice in any stew or beef stroganoff is the addition of a browning sauce which I do at the very end and it gives the stew look a nice rich brown color (I use in in stir-fry as well)....the sauce comes in a small brown bottle with a yellow label (mine does) and is labeled Kitchen Bouquet browning sauce.......it's the perfect end-all accent.........
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Old 01-10-2009, 07:59 AM   #82
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What cut did you use for the stew? Could you tell us your procedure and ingredients?
I used shanks, chuck and "stew meat".. other ingredients I used are herbs and spices (bay leaves, cloves etc..), can tomato, tomato paste, carrots, potatoes, onion, garlic, pepper, salt and water since I didn't have stock.

I fried onions, browned the meat, added other ingredients, except potatoes and carrots, and brought to a boil. Then reduced heat and simmered for 90 minutes. Then added potatoes and carrots (after sauteeing a little) and continued simmering for an hour or more..
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Old 01-10-2009, 08:19 AM   #83
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goodness, AM, you're really going to a lot of trouble......must taste great......I'm lazy.....I just brown the meat and then throw everything else in (I use top sirloin so it's not knarly (I love that word) and tough and I buy it on sale when I can as it makes great stroganoff as well---it's ready to go pretty quick)......if it's frozen veggies then it goes in the last 3-5 minutes, however
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Old 01-10-2009, 08:27 AM   #84
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goodness, AM, you're really going to a lot of trouble......must taste great......I'm lazy.....I just brown the meat and then throw everything else in (I use top sirloin so it's not knarly (I love that word) and tough and I buy it on sale when I can as it makes great stroganoff as well---it's ready to go pretty quick)......if it's frozen veggies then it goes in the last 3-5 minutes, however
AM is that me? Well, I'm still an amateur learning to cook by trial and error. Today I want to make Turkish style zucchini fritters, but I don't know what cheese to use instead of feta, which I don't have on hand.
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Old 01-10-2009, 08:43 AM   #85
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oh, my, will you come and cook for me......you are so enthusiastic.........if I was to guess on the cheese for the zucchini instead of feta (which sounds great by the way) I'd go with a sprinkle of parmesan........I really don't know where you are or what you're budget is.......
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Old 01-10-2009, 09:32 AM   #86
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oh, my, will you come and cook for me......you are so enthusiastic.........if I was to guess on the cheese for the zucchini instead of feta (which sounds great by the way) I'd go with a sprinkle of parmesan........I really don't know where you are or what you're budget is.......
Lol, do I sound so enthousiastic.. I also thought parmesan would be a good choice but wasn't sure. Thank you for the tip...
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Old 01-10-2009, 09:52 AM   #87
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you're welcome..........:) and don't forget a small sprinkle of rosemary as well....SMALL
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Old 01-10-2009, 01:41 PM   #88
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What cut did you use for the stew? Could you tell us your procedure and ingredients?

I find the best cuts for stew are usually the toughest, gnarliest cuts out there. Those particular muscles were really worked hard by the critter, and have a slightly stronger taste. Personally, I use either chuck, sirloin, or round steak. If you buy a roast and cut it down into pieces, you will save money as the price / pound is less than pre-packaged "stew meat".

Also, I make a point of making my own stock, usually in 2 gallon batches, then freezing the stock in ice cube trays, and storing the cubes in gallon ziplock baggies. This way, whenever I want to make a stew, I have homemade, high-quality stock, full of gelatin, which gives a good stock it's body and flavor. I don't make "pork" stock, but rather, I always keep chicken, beef, and shrimp stock on hand. As long as there is lots of cartiliage and skin in the chicken stock when I'm simmering it, LOTS of gelatin will render out. As long as I go to the Asian grocery store, I can pick up some beef knuckles, which are LOADED with cartiliage. It usually takes 24 - 36 hours for that cartiliage to break down into gelatin, but is well worth the wait. I have even been known to make a small batch of beef demi-glace if I get a really gelatin-rich batch of beef stock.
While you're at the Asian market, pick up some chicken feet. I'm serious. The best chicken broth I ever made was using a whole cut up chicken, bones saved from a roasted chicken and chicken feet. There is a lot of flavor in feet.
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Old 01-10-2009, 01:55 PM   #89
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in Egypt is was common to get chicken feet with your chicken....fancy that..... along with a few odd and end feathers......not sure if feathers will add to the stock, however.....I believe you cause you have no recourse in KZ but to make your own stock and I will use just about anything
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Old 01-10-2009, 01:58 PM   #90
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I add RO-Tel green chilies and tomatoes. I like a tomato based stew.

Later
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