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Old 11-18-2006, 05:18 AM   #1
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Casseroles.

Your casseroles are so different to ours. Ours are more like Meat,Vegies,rice or pasta,stock,seasonings,garlic,if u want, a lot of herbs, and anything else u want all put into one pot, then cooked for hours on end, till it is so tender it falls apart on your fork. If anyone wants a recipie from Australia to try our casserole, I will gladley give u one, there are many out there, but Im sure I can come up with one or two of them, if u r interested.

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Old 11-18-2006, 08:20 AM   #2
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Well, SURE!!

Please post a couple of your favorite casserole recipes from "down under"!

Lee
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Old 11-27-2006, 04:09 PM   #3
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I agree, please post a few of your favorites
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Old 11-27-2006, 05:22 PM   #4
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European casseroles seem different to the American ones on here, too. Much more the beef or chicken stew type of thing.
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Old 11-27-2006, 06:01 PM   #5
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SW and Ishbel, please post away would love to try the recipes.
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Old 11-27-2006, 06:02 PM   #6
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American casseroles are mainly designed as a convenience for the cook. Throw in a can of this, a can of that, some kind of starch (potatoes, rice or pasta), a little meat, a topping, and stick in the oven.
They are economical, as they make a little meat go a long way. There are fewer dishes to wash, and less preparation time is involved. Soups, stews and skillet dinners all require more attention...with a casserole, you just set the timer and forget it.
Casseroles are also a good way of sneaking vegetables in on your husband and kids. They just might eat some of that broccoli that's hanging out with all that cheese and pasta.

That being said, I can't stand a steady diet of them. Sometimes I want a piece of meat that I have to cut up and chew.



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Old 11-28-2006, 04:00 AM   #7
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Thanks for the explanation, Constance. I have always been puzzled to read a casserole thread on here which often is a side dish of vegetables or pasta or a mixture. This wikipedia entry (which I suspect was written by an American!) made sense of the 'differences' between European (and I include Australia/New Zealand/S.Africa in that term, for this purpose!) and US 'casseroles'. it would appear that things we call casseroles, would be called stews in the USA. Here a rule of thumb might be (although others won't agree) that if it's cooked on the top of the stove it's a stew, in the oven it's a casserole!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casserole
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Old 11-28-2006, 06:23 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
Thanks for the explanation, Constance. I have always been puzzled to read a casserole thread on here which often is a side dish of vegetables or pasta or a mixture. This wikipedia entry (which I suspect was written by an American!) made sense of the 'differences' between European (and I include Australia/New Zealand/S.Africa in that term, for this purpose!) and US 'casseroles'. it would appear that things we call casseroles, would be called stews in the USA. Here a rule of thumb might be (although others won't agree) that if it's cooked on the top of the stove it's a stew, in the oven it's a casserole!
!!??

While I know any number of differences in meaning between American English and U.K. English, this one's new to me! Your rule of thumb works for me, Ishbel.
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Old 11-28-2006, 08:35 AM   #9
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I'm American and grew up in America.

I think that the overwhelming difference between Europe/Australia/N.Zeal. and the US is that in the US, casseroles are all about using processed foods. In Europe, the casseroles are all about using up fresh ingredients that you have left over from other meals. I rarely purchase ingredients to make a casserole. Sauces are freshly made from a simple roux plus herbs, spices and other fresh ingredients.

We don't eat processed foods, but we love casseroles. I get frustrated at the ingredient list that always begins with "a can of cream of mushroom soup". To me, that's not cooking. And when I post recipe requests and say, "Only fresh ingredients", I never get replies. It's frustrating.

I don't mean to be snarky or anything... just voicing my frustration at the lack of truly "scratch" casserole recipes that are out there.
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Old 11-28-2006, 09:03 AM   #10
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I'm just going to do a search and see if I can find any of my casserole posts!

Beef casserole with thyme, balsamic vinegar and horseradish

A pheasant casserole! Pheasant casserole

and a lamb casserole Lamb casserole with butterbeans
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