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Old 05-28-2011, 03:42 PM   #21
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Where in South Eastern Ontario are you? I am in Eastern Ontario and there is a lot of Ontario South of me. You don't have to devulge your exact location. I won't show up on your doorstep with a cooler of beer and some rowdy friends, if you don't want me to,
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Old 05-28-2011, 03:46 PM   #22
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I'm within shouting distance from where your relatives have their sugar bush. Maybe not shouting distance, but as the crow flies, about 8 miles.
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Old 05-28-2011, 04:06 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
The recipe reminds me of the proverbial, church potluck "Tuna Noodle Casserole" except with ground beef instead of tuna.

I Like tuna noodle casserole!
From ND by way of Ontario, through WI and IA, we love this stuff. Good church cookin'. Called "hot dish" from where I've been.
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Old 05-28-2011, 06:30 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
The reason I bring this up is that we were discussing casseroles and one challenge consisted of taking a simple everyday staple dish and prepare it in the most labour intensive manner, using the most expensive ingredients possible. You know, sort of like Emeril LaGasbag making green bean casserole with homemade wild mushroom soup and hand cut onion rings dredged in flour and Essence. The following was my contribution, sort of a kicked up Tuna Noodle Casserole:

NEW AGE TUNA NOODLE CASSEROLE

Ingredients:
  • ½ cup soy sauce
  • ½ cup dry sherry
  • ½ cup sesame oil
  • ½ cup ginger, grated
  • 3 cloves garlic, pressed or finely minced
  • 1 tsp grey sea salt
  • ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 lb Sashimi grade Ahi tuna
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 cups flour
  • ½ tsp kosher salt
  • 2 quarts chicken stock
  • 2 Tbs butter
  • ½ cup celery, chopped
  • 1 shallot, diced
  • 1 ½ cups haricot verts
  • 1 clove of garlic, peeled
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • 1 tsp fresh thyme
  • ½ cup sour cream
  • 1 cup gruyere cheese, shredded
  • ½ cup camembert cheese, diced
  • 4 ounces dry white wine
  • Pinch of nutmeg
  • ¼ cup scallions, thinly sliced, white and green parts
  • ¼ cup carrot, diced small
  • ¼ cup red bell pepper, diced small
Directions:

Combine first seven ingredients (through black pepper) and marinate tuna for one hour. Remove tuna from marinade and discard marinade. Place tuna in a steamer over 1 inch of boiling water and cover. Steam for 6 to 8 minutes or until tuna flakes easily with a fork. Flake the tuna and put aside.

Beat eggs until frothy. Combine flour, kosher salt, and eggs to form a dough. Knead dough until smooth. Turn dough onto a floured cutting board and roll dough, turning often, until thin. Let dough dry 45 minutes, then turn and dry another half hour. Cut dried dough into noodles. Drop noodles into boiling chicken stock, reduce heat, and simmer for about 10 minutes. Drain and put aside.

Sauté celery and shallot in 2 Tbs butter and put aside. Place 1 ½ cups haricot verts in boiling water for 5 minutes, then into ice bath. Combine tuna, noodles, celery and shallots in a bowl.

Finely chop garlic and combine with salt. Place the egg yolk and Dijon mustard in a bowl and whisk. Slowly add olive oil as you continue to whisk. Once you've blended in all the olive oil, add the garlic lemon, and thyme. Add the sour cream, gruyere cheese, camembert cheese, white wine, and nutmeg, then fold in the tuna, noodle, celery and shallot mixture.

Spoon all ingredients into a buttered 4 quart casserole. Bake at 350 degrees F for 30 to 45 minutes or until hot and bubbly. Garnish with scallion, carrot, and bell pepper.

BTW, if you're wondering about addition of the haricot vert, the lady with the jarred sausages said she didn't like peas in her tuna noodle casserole!

Sashimi grade Ahi tuna---- in tuna casserole! My you really did follow the rules of your challenge. It must have been fabulous.
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Old 05-28-2011, 11:23 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by joesfolk View Post
Sashimi grade Ahi tuna---- in tuna casserole! My you really did follow the rules of your challenge. It must have been fabulous.
I never got to make it. The bank wouldn't give me a second mortgage to buy the ingredients.
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Old 05-29-2011, 08:38 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I'm within shouting distance from where your relatives have their sugar bush. Maybe not shouting distance, but as the crow flies, about 8 miles.
So, you aren't far from some of those yummy St. Albert cheese curds, then?
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Old 05-29-2011, 09:02 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
Warning--I'm a linguist by training, I'm going to take a guess at this, but when the Scandinavian immigrants moved to the area and attended church suppers (or a barn raising), there probably was a table set up with the cold dishes (like a smorgasbord) and one with hot dishes and one with desserts. So when they would translate what the recipe might be in English, they would tack on "hot dish" (potato and ham hot dish) because their English may not have included the word casserole (which comes from French and was for the pan, and evolved during the 1950s to mean the dish cooked in the pan, whereas I have cookbooks from my grandmother with recipes for hotdishes). That's my guess on how hotdish becaume a word and became part of the regional dialect. It isn't often I get to "talk" about food and etymology in the same post <g>.
That sounds very likely to me. A standard Scandinavian smørgåsbord has hot and cold dishes. In Danish and probably Norwegian and Swedish, a "kasserolle" is a deep sided cooking pot - anything from a saucepan to a Dutch oven.
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Old 05-30-2011, 08:43 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix

There's no need to post that. Not every recipe appeals to every person.

Roxy, we're not big green pepper fans here, do you think I could either omit it entirely or use a red or orange pepper?
Sorry I didn't mean to be disrespectful, I was suffering with an almighty hangover at the time!
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Old 05-30-2011, 10:08 PM   #29
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I would have never thought to add the cream of chicken soup, interesting and I'll bet yummy! I'm going to keep this on file until fall rolls around again.

And they're all hot dishes here and I'm proud to serve them to everyone
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