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Old 03-12-2013, 04:43 PM   #11
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Yay. I brought up an old post. Thinking about making NE boiled dinner this weekend. Haven't bought a corn beef brisket yet. They is on sale, although who knows what they cost any other time of year. Tempting.

When I make something like ths, same veggies and well, l cut up the beef if it isn't already stewing size and add back in the pot, it is soup.


If I serve it dry, then it is a NE boiled dinner?
But then, what to do with the juice. Neverminde, I got ideas.

Yoopers? I think I could make Pasties with the leftovers
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Old 03-12-2013, 05:03 PM   #12
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Make sure you cook extra so you can make some hash!

Chop everything fine, cook slowly in a cast iron skillet until nice and crispy then enjoy with some ketchup!

As far as the original post the code name in our house for an unusual dinner was Shutupandeatit!

When we get together we still joke about it, it's odd the things you remember!
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Old 03-12-2013, 08:23 PM   #13
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I have had, and made, the version of this that is made with a ham bone that has a bit of meat left on it. At one time I knew what this was called in French, but I can't remember. I never heard an English name for it before. I always thought of N.E. boiled dinner as something made with corned beef. Oh, and the version I have had in small Quebec towns always had the broth with it. Love the stuff.
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Old 03-12-2013, 09:09 PM   #14
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I've had it made with beef, corned beef, and venison. Each had cabbage, potatoes, carrots, and onion cooked with the meat to make a rich broth. I think my dad's version had a bit of garlic added as well. It was always served in a bowl with the broth. That's how I always made it too.

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Old 03-12-2013, 09:24 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I've had it made with beef, corned beef, and venison. Each had cabbage, potatoes, carrots, and onion cooked with the meat to make a rich broth. I think my dad's version had a bit of garlic added as well. It was always served in a bowl with the broth. That's how I always made it too.

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You gotta try it with a ham bone some time. That bone really enriches the broth. I usually make a lot. The first day it's like a chunky soup. It gets drier with each reheating.
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Old 03-12-2013, 10:54 PM   #16
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I just cooked a picnic shoulder. Or as we call it, a smoked shoulder dinner. Put in in a pan, cover with water and when it is almost done, remove the meat, add potatoes, turnips, carrots, onions and place the meat back in on top of the veggies. By the time all the ingredients in the pot are done, the liquid has reduced down quite a bit and is delicious.

My mother used to make this all the time. And she would prepare my dish for me. She would fork mash up all the veggies, add butter and some of the pan broth. She always put some of the broth in a gravy boat and put it on the table for anyone who wanted to add it to their plate.

Later in the week, when almost all the meat was off the bone, she would make pea soup. She always used split green peas along with the broth from the boiled dinner. Nothing went to waste.
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Old 03-13-2013, 09:37 AM   #17
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Addie, that sounds great. I make mine with ham, and always with the broth in the bowl.
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Old 03-13-2013, 09:44 AM   #18
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the new england boiled dinner must be handed down from the irish tradition of a one-pot boiled ham, potatoes, carrots, and cabbage. the same one we get the corned beef and cabbage for st. pat's day.

both are served "dry", no broth.

i prefer a new england clam bake, which isn't necessarily baked but steamed or boiled.
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Old 03-13-2013, 09:51 AM   #19
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We also make what we call a Yankee Pot Roast. In the summer it is made on top of the stove. In the winter in the oven. Why heat up the house in the summer. Don't waste the heat in the winter. The oven helped heat up the home.

Place a large piece of chuck in a dutch oven. Add beef stock halfway up the side of the meat. Low simmer until halfway done. Remove from the pan, place veggies in bottom of pan, put meat back in the pot. Finish cooking until veggies are done. Remove veggies and meat from pan, make a slurry of flour and water with Gravy Master or Kitchen Bouguet. My mother always put it in a lidded jar and shoook the heck out of it until no lumps were left and all flour was mixed in. Bring broth to a boil, slowly add the slurry until thickness for gravy is attained. Serve.

My mother grew up during the Depression. Nothing got wasted in our house. And I learned some valuable lessons that have stayed with me all my life.
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Old 03-13-2013, 03:25 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post

i prefer a new england clam bake, which isn't necessarily baked but steamed or boiled.
If you really want a taste of the sea, try to find a clambake that is held on the beach where they dig a pit and cover the food with seaweed. It is a lot of work, but so worth it. I went to one once as a teenager.
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