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Old 09-20-2016, 01:16 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
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English Professor. We do try.

I did NOT by any means want to come off as elitist. But yeah, it is in my daily vocabulary. I mean not that that is a word I would use daily, but one I consider as part of my useful vocabulary. Is that why people look at me strangely at the bookstore?
"English Professor. We do try." Should have known. LOL

In a bookstore? - I'm surprised that they look at you strangely!

Am glad to hear you use these words ... I think language should be used as it was intended... each word has its own nuances that cannot be replaced with "duh" "yuh know" "like, man" and my favourite 'mother' is just half a word... lol they do have their place but it should not be common.
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Old 09-20-2016, 12:08 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
'

English Professor. We do try.

I did NOT by any means want to come off as elitist. But yeah, it is in my daily vocabulary. I mean not that that is a word I would use daily, but one I consider as part of my useful vocabulary. Is that why people look at me strangely at the bookstore?

Yrs,

TBS
Nothing wrong with having an extensive vocabulary at one's disposal. I'm not an English professor, just a high school graduate, but I was partly raised by my grandmother who was a very good elementary school teacher. She was never off work, even during summer vacation, as long as she had my brother and me to "tutor".

I read, and I manage to occasionally absorb a few words from what I read, so I feel that for a layman, I don't do too badly in the vocabulary and grammar areas. I do try to keep my online posting readable, but I also make an effort to get my spelling, grammar and syntax correct as far as I understand it.
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Old 09-20-2016, 01:34 PM   #13
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Ok let me phrase this quite careful, RPCookin and Dragon Law. have said a couple things about the use of language. So lets talk a bit. Language is both a shield and a weapon. You can dismiss people who don't 'talk like you' and also load language to hurt people you don't like.

I see RPCooking's concern. And I see why it is one. I am not bragging, but I have degrees in English, one thing I am proud of is my MFA. I read and write for a living. One of the things I'm proudest of is teaching students in college.

And I teach at community college. So, often see students, many of whom become friends and sometimes colleagues. Start off with a basic high school education. I'd love to see you read more, read better, and I have some tools. I am never going to criticize you for either your education or vocabulary.

I am quite passionate, though about education in literature. Y'all pushed that button. I think as it has nothing to do with cooking, feel free to take it to a private message? This doesn't mean I am opposed to the discussion, and the second time I've said it this week, glad I am making some friends here, but I'm sure the mods want to keep it about cooking.
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Old 09-20-2016, 02:45 PM   #14
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There is the very topic-laden sub-forum "Back Porch". We (virtually) gather back there for talking and relaxing and engaging in all sorts of topics. Grab a cuppa, pull up a chair, and start a thread. Just leave the teacup set with the daffodils and a rocking chair for me, please. ;)
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Old 09-20-2016, 03:04 PM   #15
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There is the very topic-laden sub-forum "Back Porch". We (virtually) gather back there for talking and relaxing and engaging in all sorts of topics. Grab a cuppa, pull up a chair, and start a thread. Just leave the teacup set with the daffodils and a rocking chair for me, please. ;)
I would love a discussion on language; it's one of my favorite topics. And the Back Porch is a great idea. I'll take the cushioned armchair and a glass of pink wine, please.

And eFox, if I may, emoticons often come in handy, especially when you're new to an online place and people haven't learned your humor yet
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Old 09-20-2016, 03:21 PM   #16
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Ok language thread is posted.

I do honestly try most of the time to keep to cooking, but you all are interesting people.

TBS
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Old 09-20-2016, 06:35 PM   #17
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Ok language thread is posted.

I do honestly try most of the time to keep to cooking, but you all are interesting people.

TBS
That's one thing about cooking - it attracts an amazingly diverse and often fascinating blend of people and personalities. After all, everyone has to eat, no matter what their nationality or background. Why not join a group that not only likes food, but loves to discuss any and all food related topics?
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barley, meat, recipe, vegetables

Pottage I noticed we have a couple of threads going at this time about stretching your food dollar. As many of you know, I am a history buff, and often look to historical recipes for inspiration. pottage is the quintessential peasant food of Britain, and a good way to both recycle leftovers, and to make a nutritious meal in a pot. When I was in grad school, we always had a pot of it either going, being eaten, or in portions. Referred to it as 'grad student chow'. Nowadays my wife and I refer to a portion of pottage as 'porsh', as in, well you won't be home at a decent hour, do you want me to hold your food, or will you grab a porsh? I also do have two 10 gallon pails of unhulled barley, amusing story, my barley manufactuer, Bread Beckers, was going out of business, so I bought what I thought was two gallons, turned out to be two ten gallon pails. So I have a ton of barley. Pottage is a mixture of grains, meat, and vegetables. Usually we throw into the pot what we have, it is excellent for cleaning up leftovers, for instance. Don't feel bound by this recipe, Let's call this one an 'ideal' pottage. Pottage (ideal) 1 lb ground beef 6-8 cloves garlic 1 cup unhulled barley 2 cups stock 1 can ro-tel diced tomatoes and chillies 1 can black beans 1 large onion 16 oz chopped spinich, frozen, or an equal amount fresh 1 can cream of mushroom soup 1 tsp cayanne 1 tsp paprika 1 tsp chilli powder 1 tbsp mustard salt and black pepper to taste. 1 tbsp olive oil brown the meat in olive oil, with garlic and onion. Drain grease and reserve. Add barley and stock to a large stock pot, bring to boil. Add remaining ingredients, and reserved meat. Reduce heat to a simmer, simmer for at least an hour. Easy peasy. you can portion these out, and freeze them, they freeze very well. It is pretty cheap, particularly if you already have barley. 3 stars 1 reviews
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