"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Soups, Stews & Casseroles > Casseroles
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-15-2016, 11:41 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 475
Pottage

I noticed we have a couple of threads going at this time about stretching your food dollar. As many of you know, I am a history buff, and often look to historical recipes for inspiration. pottage is the quintessential peasant food of Britain, and a good way to both recycle leftovers, and to make a nutritious meal in a pot.

When I was in grad school, we always had a pot of it either going, being eaten, or in portions. Referred to it as 'grad student chow'. Nowadays my wife and I refer to a portion of pottage as 'porsh', as in, well you won't be home at a decent hour, do you want me to hold your food, or will you grab a porsh?

I also do have two 10 gallon pails of unhulled barley, amusing story, my barley manufactuer, Bread Beckers, was going out of business, so I bought what I thought was two gallons, turned out to be two ten gallon pails. So I have a ton of barley.

Pottage is a mixture of grains, meat, and vegetables. Usually we throw into the pot what we have, it is excellent for cleaning up leftovers, for instance. Don't feel bound by this recipe, Let's call this one an 'ideal' pottage.

Pottage (ideal)

1 lb ground beef
6-8 cloves garlic
1 cup unhulled barley
2 cups stock
1 can ro-tel diced tomatoes and chillies
1 can black beans
1 large onion
16 oz chopped spinich, frozen, or an equal amount fresh
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1 tsp cayanne
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp chilli powder
1 tbsp mustard
salt and black pepper to taste.
1 tbsp olive oil

brown the meat in olive oil, with garlic and onion. Drain grease and reserve.

Add barley and stock to a large stock pot, bring to boil.

Add remaining ingredients, and reserved meat.

Reduce heat to a simmer, simmer for at least an hour.

Easy peasy. you can portion these out, and freeze them, they freeze very well.

It is pretty cheap, particularly if you already have barley.

__________________

__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2016, 04:19 AM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,034
That recipe looks like a great "porsch" to come home to on a bitter cold day. The only thing I am not fond of are the black beans. I would use Great Northern beans. And I don't think I have ever seen unhulled barley. So I would have to use a packaged barley. I love barley.

You did leave out one item though. "The Kitchen Sink!"
__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2016, 08:39 AM   #3
Head Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 1,079
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
You did leave out one item though. "The Kitchen Sink!"
I agree Addie, that is my very favourite. I add "The Kitchen Sink" to almost everything.

fox - that sounds incredible. I'll have to start a pot real soon! Love to have porsch in the fridge and freezer for those lazy nights. And I love barley too!
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2016, 06:04 PM   #4
Master Chef
 
Cheryl J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 6,298
Sounds good there Fox, thanks for sharing your recipe. I love soups/stews with a lot of goodies.
__________________
Grandchildren fill the space in your heart you never knew was empty.
Cheryl J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2016, 10:39 AM   #5
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
I noticed we have a couple of threads going at this time about stretching your food dollar. As many of you know, I am a history buff, and often look to historical recipes for inspiration. pottage is the quintessential peasant food of Britain, and a good way to both recycle leftovers, and to make a nutritious meal in a pot.

When I was in grad school, we always had a pot of it either going, being eaten, or in portions. Referred to it as 'grad student chow'. Nowadays my wife and I refer to a portion of pottage as 'porsh', as in, well you won't be home at a decent hour, do you want me to hold your food, or will you grab a porsh?

I also do have two 10 gallon pails of unhulled barley, amusing story, my barley manufactuer, Bread Beckers, was going out of business, so I bought what I thought was two gallons, turned out to be two ten gallon pails. So I have a ton of barley.

Pottage is a mixture of grains, meat, and vegetables. Usually we throw into the pot what we have, it is excellent for cleaning up leftovers, for instance. Don't feel bound by this recipe, Let's call this one an 'ideal' pottage.

Pottage (ideal)

1 lb ground beef
6-8 cloves garlic
1 cup unhulled barley
2 cups stock
1 can ro-tel diced tomatoes and chillies
1 can black beans
1 large onion
16 oz chopped spinich, frozen, or an equal amount fresh
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1 tsp cayanne
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp chilli powder
1 tbsp mustard
salt and black pepper to taste.
1 tbsp olive oil

brown the meat in olive oil, with garlic and onion. Drain grease and reserve.

Add barley and stock to a large stock pot, bring to boil.

Add remaining ingredients, and reserved meat.

Reduce heat to a simmer, simmer for at least an hour.

Easy peasy. you can portion these out, and freeze them, they freeze very well.

It is pretty cheap, particularly if you already have barley.
I'd be careful about referring to the "peasants" if you ever visit the UK. Thereby hangs misfortune

Seriously though an original English mediaeval pottage would not have included tomatoes, chillis, paprkia, chilli powder, cayenne or black beans as these came from your side of the pond, post Columbus.
__________________
Don’t look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2016, 08:37 PM   #6
Senior Cook
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
I'd be careful about referring to the "peasants" if you ever visit the UK. Thereby hangs misfortune

Seriously though an original English mediaeval pottage would not have included tomatoes, chillis, paprkia, chilli powder, cayenne or black beans as these came from your side of the pond, post Columbus.
You have a point, though I do believe I am capturing the 'spirit' of pottage.

I really love Maxime de la Falaise's book Seven Centuries of English Cooking, and also anything Dariana Allen from Ireland writes. But yeah, not the genuine English Farmer (notice I didn't use peasant!) deal from the time period. I do think there is a reason why there aren't many Medieval English Farmer restaurants, they had a limited diet from what I know. So I do like adding my New World additions.

I'm going to be making up an Irish Coddle tomorrow, which is a bit more authentic. Though I do sub out bacon and sausage for turkey bacon and turkey sausage, as my wife is Jewish, and doesn't eat the pig.

Cheers!

TBS
__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2016, 12:26 AM   #7
Head Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 1,079
Now now... don't take things out of context...

I'm not a History buff per se, but I don't think 'peasant' is a forbidden word unless you actually "call" someone a peasant with the intention of being derogatory.

There were 'peasants' 'serfs' 'knights' 'landed gentry' 'royalty' 'warlords' ... etc.

history is what it is - changing, deleting or using another word doesn't change it.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2016, 12:33 AM   #8
Senior Cook
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 475
Yeah and I cook a lot of what I call 'peasant food' I call it that from where it is cooked, generally poor people, on the land, trying to make good. I don't feel it is a pejorative, just a descriptive.

TBS
__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2016, 12:52 AM   #9
Head Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 1,079
Quote:
Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
a pejorative, .

TBS
OK, ok ... had to look that one up! is that in your daily vocabulary?
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2016, 01:05 AM   #10
Senior Cook
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 475
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
OK, ok ... had to look that one up! is that in your daily vocabulary?
'

English Professor. We do try.

I did NOT by any means want to come off as elitist. But yeah, it is in my daily vocabulary. I mean not that that is a word I would use daily, but one I consider as part of my useful vocabulary. Is that why people look at me strangely at the bookstore?

Yrs,

TBS
__________________

__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
barley, meat, recipe, vegetables

Pottage I noticed we have a couple of threads going at this time about stretching your food dollar. As many of you know, I am a history buff, and often look to historical recipes for inspiration. pottage is the quintessential peasant food of Britain, and a good way to both recycle leftovers, and to make a nutritious meal in a pot. When I was in grad school, we always had a pot of it either going, being eaten, or in portions. Referred to it as 'grad student chow'. Nowadays my wife and I refer to a portion of pottage as 'porsh', as in, well you won't be home at a decent hour, do you want me to hold your food, or will you grab a porsh? I also do have two 10 gallon pails of unhulled barley, amusing story, my barley manufactuer, Bread Beckers, was going out of business, so I bought what I thought was two gallons, turned out to be two ten gallon pails. So I have a ton of barley. Pottage is a mixture of grains, meat, and vegetables. Usually we throw into the pot what we have, it is excellent for cleaning up leftovers, for instance. Don't feel bound by this recipe, Let's call this one an 'ideal' pottage. Pottage (ideal) 1 lb ground beef 6-8 cloves garlic 1 cup unhulled barley 2 cups stock 1 can ro-tel diced tomatoes and chillies 1 can black beans 1 large onion 16 oz chopped spinich, frozen, or an equal amount fresh 1 can cream of mushroom soup 1 tsp cayanne 1 tsp paprika 1 tsp chilli powder 1 tbsp mustard salt and black pepper to taste. 1 tbsp olive oil brown the meat in olive oil, with garlic and onion. Drain grease and reserve. Add barley and stock to a large stock pot, bring to boil. Add remaining ingredients, and reserved meat. Reduce heat to a simmer, simmer for at least an hour. Easy peasy. you can portion these out, and freeze them, they freeze very well. It is pretty cheap, particularly if you already have barley. 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.