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Old 09-27-2014, 06:24 PM   #51
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I'm Swedish and was born in Minneapolis and lived in Fargo! My grandparents immigrated from Sweden. They spoke Swedish a lot and called me Yenny.

Never had a "hot dish" in either place.

Had plenty of weird Nordic food, though... ����
When I lived in Tacoma, our mail lady was Swedish and she had the most lovely lilt to her accent. I could sit and listen to her talk all day.

We also had the Pacific Lutheran University just up the street from my home. Every graduation the King of Sweden would alternate with the King of Norway or Denmark (I forget which one) and would give the speech in their native tongue. One year the daughter of the woman I used to run for her dialysis was graduating and asked me to go with her. I didn't understand one word he said, but I loved listening to him. They did have a large screen up showing the translation. It was tradition that the welcoming speech be given in a Scandinavian tongue. The University was owned by two countries.
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Old 09-27-2014, 06:29 PM   #52
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I could barely understand my grandparents' English.

Swedish to me then was best described as "neerna neerna neerna ??"

But today I wish I had picked up on at least some of it!!
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Old 09-27-2014, 06:33 PM   #53
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I could barely understand my grandparents' English.

Swedish to me then was best described as "neerna neerna neerna ??"

But today I wish I had picked up on at least some of it!!
How many times have I heard, "I wish I had paid attention when my grandparents were speaking Italian." My generation was the first American born generation here in this city.
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Old 09-27-2014, 07:08 PM   #54
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The government of Quebec, in its efforts to protect the French language, has rules about who can go to English school. If your parents went to English school in Quebec, you can go.

This had the unexpected result that most kids with Italian parents, speak really good Italian. See, the kids learn French in school and the parents tend to speak English when they aren't speaking Italian. So, the kids learn Italian. The percentage of Italian speaking 1st gens went up after those rules kicked in. It seems to be carrying over to the 2nd gens.
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Old 09-27-2014, 09:03 PM   #55
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The government of Quebec, in its efforts to protect the French language, has rules about who can go to English school. If your parents went to English school in Quebec, you can go.

This had the unexpected result that most kids with Italian parents, speak really good Italian. See, the kids learn French in school and the parents tend to speak English when they aren't speaking Italian. So, the kids learn Italian. The percentage of Italian speaking 1st gens went up after those rules kicked in. It seems to be carrying over to the 2nd gens.
It never hurts to have a second language. I can only speak English and Childrenese.
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Old 09-27-2014, 10:53 PM   #56
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jenny, i don't know why but i've pictured you as small (petite); raven haired, straight and silky; big, almond eyes of dark brown; grey business suit, and a giant club.

for work.

ya know.
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Old 09-28-2014, 08:46 AM   #57
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jenny, i don't know why but i've pictured you as small (petite); raven haired, straight and silky; big, almond eyes of dark brown; grey business suit, and a giant club.

for work.

ya know.
LOL!!

Not quite!! Although I do have grey business suits and a club!!
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Old 09-28-2014, 10:33 AM   #58
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I'm Swedish and was born in Minneapolis and lived in Fargo! My grandparents immigrated from Sweden. They spoke Swedish a lot and called me Yenny.

Never had a "hot dish" in either place.

Had plenty of weird Nordic food, though... ����
That is surprising, I grew up 20 minutes from Fargo, and hotdishes were popular at Lutheran Church suppers, potlucks, etc.

“Hot Dish Club” making meals for families in-need | FargoSchoolTalk

thatssewnina: Make Ahead Mondays: North Dakota Hotdish

Try the Hotdish! | Becoming Midwestern Try the Hotdish! | Follow me as I attempt to become truly Midwestern.

The term "hotdish" is alive and well in North Dakota as well.
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Old 09-28-2014, 11:33 AM   #59
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Good stuff, CWS! Read the third link, in the comments is a link to a Dave Barry article on ND, hilarious!
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Old 09-28-2014, 11:55 AM   #60
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Good stuff, CWS! Read the third link, in the comments is a link to a Dave Barry article on ND, hilarious!
I loved Garrison Kellior's Prairehome Companion when he'd talk about Lutheran Church suppers...
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ground beef, recipe, rotel, tater tots

Tater Tot Casserole/Hotdish Cover the bottom of a 13 X 9 casserole dish with tater tots. Place in a 425 degree oven for 15 to 20 minutes. Sweat 1 cup diced onion Add 1.5 pounds ground beef (I used 93% lean) and brown. If needed drain off fat Add 2 packages of Chili seasoning and 2 cans of rotel (10oz) cook until most of the moisture has evaporated. Add 1 10oz package of frozen corn. Turn off cooktop. Remove dish from the oven and cover with the beef mixture. Return to oven for 20 minutes. Top with one can of enchilada sauce and 2 cups of shredded cheese. (I used a 4 cheese Mexican blend) Return to oven until the cheese is slightly browned [IMG]http://i1191.photobucket.com/albums/z467/powerplantop/TaterTotFB_zps21dc750f.jpg[/IMG] 3 stars 1 reviews
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