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Old 01-25-2018, 03:54 PM   #1
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Beef Stew Question

I've found some Beef Stew recipes using "White" potatoes, and some recipes using "Sweet" potatoes. Cooking times for each recipe vary all over the place. Some Sweet potato recipes take 6 - 10 hrs. on LOW. Some White potato recipes also range from 6 - 10 hrs.

So I combined both potatoes and checked the stew at 7 hrs. The White potatoes were perfect and the Sweet potatoes were mushy. Granted my Crockpot runs fast, but shouldn't the potatoes have cooked at the same time?
Next time, should I add White potatoes first, and then Sweet potatoes 2- 3 hrs. later?

Oh, as to the previous post on thickeners, I found Quinoa works great. It sucks up the liquid and forms a really thick gravy.

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Old 01-25-2018, 04:42 PM   #2
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Yes. I make a few soups/stews where potatoes are cooked down with the initial ingredients so they become part of the stew, then add more potatoes later so that they are still recognizable as potatoes in the final product.
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Old 01-25-2018, 05:50 PM   #3
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not all potatoes are created equally..type, age. all have an effect on how they are going to cook up..Like BT said, they will eventually break down to nothing. I don't think they are good for slow cooking as they break down too quickly and even if you do have some left, they are so mushy, you can't even eat them with a fork or taste them
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Old 01-25-2018, 07:22 PM   #4
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I don't do much with sweet potatoes, although for my health, I should do more. I do know that I never put potatoes into a long cooking stew or soup at the start. I put them in towards the end of the cook, for just the amount of time I think they need to cook. Otherwise, they get "waterlogged" and have no bite to them.

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Old 01-25-2018, 08:34 PM   #5
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Great! Thanks for the info. I'll have to start timing when to put in the Sweet Potatoes.
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Old 01-26-2018, 10:34 AM   #6
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I use both Irish and sweet potatoes....sometimes a turnip root or two...added at the very end, just long enough to cook. Thickening come in the form of a roux.

Potato soup is another animal.

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Old 01-29-2018, 05:27 PM   #7
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Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't sweet potato is not potato at all? It is a different species, despite what it's called.
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Old 01-29-2018, 07:42 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
I use both Irish and sweet potatoes....sometimes a turnip root or two...added at the very end, just long enough to cook. Thickening come in the form of a roux.

Potato soup is another animal.

Fun!
What's an Irish potato?
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Old 01-29-2018, 07:53 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
What's an Irish potato?
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Old 01-29-2018, 07:58 PM   #10
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Lol.
The moustache is all wrong, but the pink ears and attitude are spot on.

Seriously, though, I've never heard the term Irish potato.

Like snakes, there is no indigenous tuber. Just wondering about the etymology/regional dialogue of the term.
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