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Old 02-13-2007, 09:50 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poutine
For a stew are you adding a thickener at the end (ie flour)? Before you add the flour just pour off some of the excess liquid (I use this liquid to cook rice/potatoes/barley/quinoa to add more flavour).
No I didn't do this. Do I just mix some flour into the stew? When? About 1 hour before it's done?
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Old 02-13-2007, 10:29 AM   #12
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You may even want to dredge your pot roast in a seasoned four and then brown it off prior to putting it into the crock pot. This will actually cook out the flour taste and make a bit of roux which will give a little thickening power. If things are still too wet at the end, drain off the liquid and pour it into a seprate pan and put that onto a burner and give it a taste. If it's bland season it or reduce it to increase your flavor and then thicken it with a white wash ( flour and water) or some more roux. Return it to your meat and veggies. There are some crock pot recipes especially chicken base that use canned cream of mushroom soup as part of the sauce which will give you a thick sauce at the end.
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Old 02-13-2007, 11:43 AM   #13
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I hardly ever use much water in my crock pot. Usually just enough tocover the bottom of the crock. Post roast is set on trivet or rack inside and veggies added later after meat has cooked a bit. If I think it needs more water it can always be added later.
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Old 02-13-2007, 12:12 PM   #14
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When I make pasta sauces, stews, goulash, etc. in the crock pot, I always start my cooking on the stove in a stock pot, bring to a boil then simmer for an hour or so. I then transfer it to the crock pot and let it simmer for 5-6 hours. If you start everything in the crock pot it will always taste boiled. Sear your meats & veggies in a pan/pot first to give it the best flavor. Also, unless your adding a thickener/potatoes to your stews it will not reduce enough in the crock pot to thicken.
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Old 02-13-2007, 12:30 PM   #15
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[quote=Jeekinz]When I make pasta sauces, stews, goulash, etc. in the crock pot, I always start my cooking on the stove in a stock pot, bring to a boil then simmer for an hour or so. I then transfer it to the crock pot and let it simmer for 5-6 hours...quote]

If you do all that work in the stock pot on the stovetop, why bother with the crockpot at all?
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Old 02-13-2007, 12:44 PM   #16
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Less gas, makes room on the stove, less chance for burning, I can go about my daily business w/o worrying, I can have fun cooking in the am, and enjoy it in the pm. As I said, those recipies simmer for 5-6 hrs. I get the stovetop taste with crockpot ease.
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Old 02-13-2007, 01:29 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz
Less gas, makes room on the stove, less chance for burning, I can go about my daily business w/o worrying, I can have fun cooking in the am, and enjoy it in the pm. As I said, those recipies simmer for 5-6 hrs. I get the stovetop taste with crockpot ease.

Fair enough.

Where I live, gas is a lot less expensive than electricity so I don't use a CP.
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Old 02-13-2007, 02:09 PM   #18
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Old 02-13-2007, 02:17 PM   #19
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Old 02-13-2007, 04:14 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poutine
on this web site Electric Bill Estimator - Department of Water and Power
they estimate it costs $0.043407 (just over 4 cents) to run a crock pot for 7 hours
an electric oven at 350F for 7 hours is $0.87 (still not a lot but 20 times more expensive than a crock pot)
I knew that crock pots did not take very much energy but that is crazy!

I wonder how much it costs to run a gas stove for 7 hours?
You would not cook something for as long on the stove as you would in the crock pot. Crock pots are slow cookers. The same meal (usually) can be made on the stove top in a fraction of the time.
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