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Old 09-25-2005, 02:43 PM   #1
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Need Some New Crockpot Cooking Times

Don't most crockpot recipes call for cooking times of between 4 to 8 hours (depending on whether you set the thing for high or low temps)?

Now that I'm working, I need some recipes for dishes that cook over even longer times. If I put something on at 6 a.m. when I leave for work, it will be 11 hours before I am home again (around 5), and still a little too early for dinner.

or...

I could train my kid to switch the crockpot on when she gets home at 3:30. But then it's only 3 hours until 6:30, our typical dinner hour. And of course I don't want to leave it out all day on the counter until she gets home, so that means it's got to get the chill off from being in the fridge before it actually starts cooking.

Anybody got any ideas? I do have that "Fix It and Forget It" crockpot cookbook, but most of the recipes have inconvenient cooking times.

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Old 09-25-2005, 02:55 PM   #2
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mudbug, that is a hard question. I have the same problem. I leave for work at 6:30 am and don't get back home until 6:00 pm. on a normal day. Depending on the recipe I have added some additional water. This can be done with stews and chilis. Some new crockpots have a timer on them. I have been thinking by buying one. I will look through my recipes and see if I have any with longer cooking times.
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Old 09-25-2005, 03:09 PM   #3
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thanks, SC. Not sure there is an answer to our dilemma, but can't hurt to ask around. Let me know if you find anything useful.

My crockpot is fairly new, so I don't want to go buy another one with a timer. Even so, then you've got the sitting-on-the-counter-waiting-to-be-turned-on problem OR the cooked-and-getting-colder-by-the-minute problem, don't you?
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Old 09-25-2005, 03:13 PM   #4
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Why not get a plugin wall timer that you wiill allow you to plug in your crockpot and
"set it and forget it" where have I heard that before. You can get them for less than $5.00.
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Old 09-25-2005, 03:19 PM   #5
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I use a light timer, the kind you use when you go on vacation and you want your lights to come on. I usually set to cook right away shut down for a hour or two and then start back up again by the time I get home everything is still hot. You can turn off your crock-pot up to 2 hours before you eat (without lifting the lid) and still find it warm enough to eat.
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Old 09-25-2005, 03:20 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug
thanks, SC. Not sure there is an answer to our dilemma, but can't hurt to ask around. Let me know if you find anything useful.

My crockpot is fairly new, so I don't want to go buy another one with a timer. Even so, then you've got the sitting-on-the-counter-waiting-to-be-turned-on problem OR the cooked-and-getting-colder-by-the-minute problem, don't you?
The timer will allow you to turn your crockpot on anytime you wish and then to shut it off when you wish anytime during a 24 hour period.
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Old 09-25-2005, 03:26 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by beaulana2
I use a light timer, the kind you use when you go on vacation and you want your lights to come on.
We use these all the time when we go out of town, beaulana. Might work! Nick, I think you were on the same track, so thanks.

I think I will try the light timer thing with something bulletproof like chili for a first experiment.
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Old 09-25-2005, 08:27 PM   #8
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I have frequently put stuff in for 12 hours or longer on low, no concerns. I just make sure I bump up the liquid content before I go. Good luck mudbug.
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Old 09-26-2005, 12:05 AM   #9
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You could put some ingredients in partially frozen (such as meat) so they will take longer to cook. If you would normally brown the meat you could probably do that before you freeze it, assuming you buy meat on sale and have enough freezer space to keep it. The crock in mine is removeable so I fill it the night before and when it goes in the pot it will take longer just to get going because of the cold crock.
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Old 09-26-2005, 12:07 AM   #10
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Or you coiud train your daughter to turn it off when she gets home. You could turn it back on when you get home so you can serve the food piping hot. Perhaps a combination of these ideas would work best for you. Good luck.
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