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Old 01-27-2011, 02:33 PM   #21
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I'd agree with all of that GW till you get to
Quote:
If the solids sing to the bottom, you will need to bind the soup.
. A binder? Why would you do that, just curious. I just cook it more, the longer it cooks the better it gets in my opinion.
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Old 01-27-2011, 02:56 PM   #22
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Thanks for the post GW.
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Old 01-27-2011, 02:56 PM   #23
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Old beans as others indicated. I had a similar issue with black garbanzo beans. They are anyway, much much tougher but old garbanzo beans will remain rock hard.

I have cooked the dozen or so beans I keep in my pantry in a crockpot at various points and they get cook just fine in 8 hours. I normally do this overnight.

Another technique to cook them fast is put them in a pot, cover with water and bring them to a boil. Then cover and let them rest for 2 hours. Then you can cook them overnight or however you want and they will soften and cook in no time. I do this with all the hard beans.

Goodluck.
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Old 01-27-2011, 03:50 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
I'd agree with all of that GW till you get to . A binder? Why would you do that, just curious. I just cook it more, the longer it cooks the better it gets in my opinion.
The binder is typically used when you have to feed a crowd and don't have to make a very large batch of soup. The solids will tend to settle. The binder keeps everything is suspension and doesn't have a negative effect on the flavor. In fact, if butter is used to make the roux, and it's seasoned with a little chicken soup base, or salt, it can actually make the soup richer in flavor, if, more calorie intense.

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Old 01-27-2011, 03:59 PM   #25
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I don't do it in the crock pot any more (after all, I'm home all day), but when I was gainfully employed I did often. I can think of one thing. If you forgot to stir everything before you left, or had the peas under the ham steak, you might have created an "envelope" where the peas were not separated at all by some stock. Some how they stuck together and didn't allow the stock to surround the peas.
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Old 01-27-2011, 04:16 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
The binder is typically used when you have to feed a crowd and don't have to make a very large batch of soup. The solids will tend to settle. The binder keeps everything is suspension and doesn't have a negative effect on the flavor. In fact, if butter is used to make the roux, and it's seasoned with a little chicken soup base, or salt, it can actually make the soup richer in flavor, if, more calorie intense.

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I guess I'm still not understanding GW. By the time mine is finished cooking there are no solids left, other than the bits of ham. I cook mine a very long time. Are you saying your peas have not become a liquid? If not, what are the solids?
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Old 01-27-2011, 04:33 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
I'd agree with all of that GW till you get to . A binder? Why would you do that, just curious. I just cook it more, the longer it cooks the better it gets in my opinion.
I make it every friday at the restaurant. I bind it with 1 part flour to 1 part margerine(only because it is less expensive than butter). A lot of cooks use flour and canola oil and stir it into a slurry cold then pour it in while wisking. One main reason I bind it is because the waiting staff is too impatient and incompetent to stir it sufficiently before serving it.
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Old 01-27-2011, 04:47 PM   #28
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I make it every friday at the restaurant. I bind it with 1 part flour to 1 part margerine(only because it is less expensive than butter). A lot of cooks use flour and canola oil and stir it into a slurry cold then pour it in while wisking. One main reason I bind it is because the waiting staff is too impatient and incompetent to stir it sufficiently before serving it.
Ahhh Haaa now I understand Rock.
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Old 01-27-2011, 05:20 PM   #29
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Even when a large pot of pea soup has been made properly, if it sits for a while, as in a restaurant, the suspended particles will settle to the pot bottom, leaving you with an almost clear broth on top. All non-clear liquids have solids in them. When the solids are heavier that the water, they will slowly sink.

You won't have that problem at home as the soup is gently boiling, which keeps everything in motion. This make the mixture of water, and solids more homogeneous. The fats seperate and rise to the top as they are more buoyant than the water. The seperation natually occurs if the liquid stands still for sufficient time.

When a binder is added, it holds all of the ingredients in suspension in the liquid, and doesn't allow them to separate.

Also, if you happen to add too much water to your pea soup, the same separation will occur. Again, a binder becomes needed.

Finally, there are people who don't like their soup with a heavy peas-soup flavor. It can be too strong for some. In that case, a binder, and a little cream adds richness, and dilutes the flavor just enough to satisfy those people.

There is no "one perfect way" of making anything. I try to make the foods I prepare work for everyone at the table. I've even been known to make the same food in multiple ways so that each person has their favorite version of it. Most people say that that is ridiculous. I say that I'm giving my best for my guests, or family, even if it takes more work. It's just the way I do things. It's almost a compulsion for me to go the extra mile.
It's what drives me to keep improving my techniques, to try other flavors, other textures, other food types. And when I find something really good, I have to share it. It's just who I am.

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Old 01-27-2011, 07:23 PM   #30
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Thank you all for your perspectives - I appreciate them all!

I'm going with the "old peas" reason ... There is absolutely nothing I'm doing differently then every other time. My crock pot losing steam might be legit, I'll experiment with another recipe next week.

I wouldn't mind trying it in a pot but it would need to be over the weekend, we get home too late for an hour or more prep dinner which is why I LOVE my crock pot.

Thank you all again!
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