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Old 06-27-2015, 01:00 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Zereh View Post
Government cheese in the mid-West (a friend was on WIC? program, I think that's what it was called) was definitely not Velveeta nor anything closely resembling it. It was 100% real cheese.
No this was not the WIC program. The WIC program was not in force when my kids were small. It was called the Government Surplus Program. It was in the late 50's early 60's. The more milk, and other products the farmers produced, left them with a surplus. So the government would buy the surplus and give it out to those on welfare or qualified in other required qualifications. The farmers were paid handsomely and received a nice check. So the next year they would even produce even a larger quantity of their products that they were farming. If 40 cows gave this much milk that the Govt. would pay for and turn it into powdered milk, then the farmer should get a check twice as big if he had 100 cows. And every year the recipients would get an increase also. What they didn't give directly to the public, they gave to the schools. Along with other organizations that fed the public. With four kids needing milk each day, I would mix up a quart of powdered milk and mix it with a 1/2 gal. of regular whole milk. You got five pounds of flour, bulger, powdered eggs, and cornmeal each month. Also, a can of shredded beef, pork beans, and other stuff. All total you got three or more five pound bags of dry goods. Two large cereal size boxes of powdered milk, and about six-eight cans of different meats. One of the cans was a whole cooked chicken. Great for chicken salad for school lunches. We also got peanut butter and jelly. Most of the foods were directed for a balanced diet for children.

To get the stuff home, you needed a cart or car. Some kids were smart and brought their carts and wagons there and stood outside to take the stuff for those who were trying to carry it themselves. Pretty little pennies they earned. I always had a baby carriage that I could put it in. By the time the baby had out grown it, I no longer qualified for the food. But the funny part was at that time, my husband went out to sea as a chef on a cargo ship. Now merchant marines come under the department of health and the General Surgeon's office. (Or whatever his title was.) So my husband is overlooking the loading food for the boat and here comes a huge supply of Government Surplus Food.

Eventually, the government caught on to what the farmer were doing each yea and cut way back on the products. And the receiving public also was cut back on the amount they received until the program came to an end.
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Old 06-27-2015, 03:13 AM   #22
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Like Dawgluver, I will use Velveeta as the cheese in a broccoli or cauliflower soup. Because it melts nice, I have also been know to toss a few chunks into a bowl of leftover broccoli. Reheated leftover broccoli NEEDS the Velveeta to glue it all together!


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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
When the government used to give out surplus foods, that cheese in five pound blocks was one of the items...
Addie, I think "that cheese" was an American Cheese type food, not Velveeta. It was firmer than Velveeta. I know, because my Dad used to embarrass my Mom beyond belief by going up to the local middle school to get his 5# block of "government cheese". Drove my Mom crazy because we weren't really "needy", but Dad thought it would help. He finally stopped under penalty of death!
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Old 06-27-2015, 03:18 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
Like Dawgluver, I will use Velveeta as the cheese in a broccoli or cauliflower soup. Because it melts nice, I have also been know to toss a few chunks into a bowl of leftover broccoli. Reheated leftover broccoli NEEDS the Velveeta to glue it all together!



Addie, I think "that cheese" was an American Cheese type food, not Velveeta. It was firmer than Velveeta. I know, because my Dad used to embarrass my Mom beyond belief by going up to the local middle school to get his 5# block of "government cheese". Drove my Mom crazy because we weren't really "needy", but Dad thought it would help. He finally stopped under penalty of death!
I got curious and looked up the Government Food Surplus program. It is still going strong. Being seniors we qualify for it. I think the only thing I would want is the flour and five pounds of butter. The butter was really delicious.

I'd say your father was very smart to get the cheese. The government just wants to get rid of it.
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Old 06-27-2015, 12:10 PM   #24
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You know, I kind of like when someone comes in and "stirs up the pot a little", and I mean that in a totally positive way

The OP hasn't been back, or at least hasn't posted, but this has brought on a great discussion among members about a pretty mundane topic - Velveeta.

I still like the Velveeta Deluxe Kraft Dinner once in awhile, but it fills my craving for "nasty junk food" and I don't need it for at least a year!

We have been looking after some young kids over the last year and I have been buying things I wouldn't normally for us - Cheese Whiz, ketchup and Kraft Peanut Butter. We eat mostly organic and the kids don't like my homemade ketchup or the natural PB I have made at the organic store! They want the REAL stuff
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Old 06-27-2015, 01:36 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
Like Dawgluver, I will use Velveeta as the cheese in a broccoli or cauliflower soup. Because it melts nice, I have also been know to toss a few chunks into a bowl of leftover broccoli. Reheated leftover broccoli NEEDS the Velveeta to glue it all together!



Addie, I think "that cheese" was an American Cheese type food, not Velveeta. It was firmer than Velveeta. I know, because my Dad used to embarrass my Mom beyond belief by going up to the local middle school to get his 5# block of "government cheese". Drove my Mom crazy because we weren't really "needy", but Dad thought it would help. He finally stopped under penalty of death!
That's true CG....it most definitely was not a cheese "product" like Velveeta. My parents also received it, although they also were against getting anything for free no matter what! The management of their senior Mobile Home park regularly delivered it to each doorstep in the park. They could never use all that cheese and they gave me their leftovers. As a young bride in the '60's I was glad to get it. It was very good cheese.
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Old 06-27-2015, 02:24 PM   #26
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The process of making Velveeta isn't all that different from making traditional cheese, or the recipe from Modernist Cuisine.

http://discovermagazine.com/2011/sep...e-food-is-made

Several years ago, we got into making cheese dip by melting Velveeta and salsa together. Almost every night one winter We've had to cut back

A master gardener friend made white chicken chili with Velveeta for a potluck. It was delicious
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Old 06-27-2015, 02:34 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Silversage View Post
Velveeta isn't actually cheese. It's "Pasteurized Recipe Cheese Product". It doesn't contain cheese, but does have milk solids, etc. Because of that, it melts beautifully, unlike real cheese, which separates into fat & solids when too much heat is applied.
Traditional cheese doesn't "contain" cheese, either, because it *is* cheese. It contains milk, an acid and usually salt. To make melty cheese, Kraft adds sodium citrate or another salt, just like the Modernist Cuisine recipe.

Velveeta is called cheese product because of the FDA's specifications for milk and moisture content in traditional cheese. It is not something alien.
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Old 06-27-2015, 02:46 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Traditional cheese doesn't "contain" cheese, either, because it *is* cheese. It contains milk, an acid and usually salt. To make melty cheese, Kraft adds calcium citrate or another salt, just like the Modernist Cuisine recipe.

Velveeta is called cheese product because of the FDA's specifications for milk and moisture content in traditional cheese. It's is not something alien.
+1. How's come I couldn't put that into words? Perfect!
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Old 06-27-2015, 02:51 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
+1. How's come I couldn't put that into words? Perfect!
Thank you I just summarized the information in the article I posted above.
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Old 06-27-2015, 04:36 PM   #30
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Too bad Ashlie seems to have disappeared as there's lots of content in this thread.

Like LP said though, we're all doing what we do best....Discuss Cooking.
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