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Old 11-08-2007, 06:59 AM   #21
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Brown sugar shouldn't make the difference, nor the colour of the egg. Personally I don't soak my dates when they are diced, but would if they were in large pieces or whole. Sounds like you used too much bicarb. Wouldn't expect a date loaf to double in size, but I am prepared to be corrected by better cooks than I, and that may be why it is drier. If you feel like experimenting, you could always omit the bicarb. It just won't rise as much.
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Old 11-08-2007, 07:38 AM   #22
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These two DC threads may be of interest to you Professor:

http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...ates-2870.html

Too much baking powder/baking soda?
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Old 11-12-2007, 03:15 AM   #23
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Hello to all
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Old 11-12-2007, 05:34 AM   #24
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Hi Professori au,

I’m not sure if you can get Unox at the other end of the world (I live in the Netherlands and yes; I’m Dutch) but they make great rookworst. Rookworst does look a lot like Frankfurter saucages but bigger with a little smokey taste. It tastes great with sauerkraut (‘zuurkool’ in Dutch), btw some raisins in the sauerkraut tastes great. Rookworst is also very nice with ‘boerenkool’ not sure if your wife ever made that, it’s a green vegetable (Brassica oleracea var. Laciniata) and it’s served with mashed potatos (like zuurkool) be sure to add some baked blocks of bacon!

Best regards
(groeten)
Mark
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Old 11-12-2007, 05:50 AM   #25
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Measuring

Hello Professori, I was just picking up your thread and I too am a very novice cookl. One thing I've learned - measuring spoons, cups, etc. are absolutely necessary for any baking. For the rest I can very accurately measure up to a teaspoon in the palm of my hand, and more for loose chopped things. But do get those measuring things!
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Old 11-12-2007, 11:16 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barkymarky View Post
Hi Professori au,

I’m not sure if you can get Unox at the other end of the world (I live in the Netherlands and yes; I’m Dutch) but they make great rookworst. Rookworst does look a lot like Frankfurter saucages but bigger with a little smokey taste. It tastes great with sauerkraut (‘zuurkool’ in Dutch), btw some raisins in the sauerkraut tastes great. Rookworst is also very nice with ‘boerenkool’ not sure if your wife ever made that, it’s a green vegetable (Brassica oleracea var. Laciniata) and it’s served with mashed potatos (like zuurkool) be sure to add some baked blocks of bacon!

Best regards
(groeten)
Mark
boerenkool = kale (Eng.)
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Old 11-12-2007, 09:54 PM   #27
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Dutch friends served this as a weeknight meal

My friends from Holland served this. I think it was called Stamppot ... very stick-to-your-ribs and tasty meal! Mieps would cut the sausage about 1" thick and sautee it in a small amount of oil to brown it. She would cook turnips, potatos, and broccoli until tender. Drained them, added butter, and then mashed the vegetables. She added salt, pepper, and a dash of nutmeg and then added the sausage to the mixture. This she poured into a buttered casserole dish which she placed in the oven ... I would guess at 350 for about 30 minutes. Mostly to let flavors meld. Only thing she served with it was fresh baked bread and butter.

Hope this is what you are looking for. I had not thought about this for quite a few years but as soon as I saw the name of the sausage, it brought back some wonderful memories.
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