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Old 04-03-2016, 09:01 AM   #11
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Welcome to the forum, Liz. Hope you pick up some good ideas here.

I am Gillian from Northern Ireland.
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Old 04-03-2016, 05:45 PM   #12
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I must say that I feel very comfortable here. Y'all aren't snooty. Fighting is against the rules. You are helpful and encouraging. The more I look around the more I learn. This is a rare and wonderful forum.

Gillian, I would like very much to know what you cook. My mom was pure Irish but she was born in England and always maintained that he she was English. Her family was dirt poor. She was ashamed that she grew up poor. Imagine that?

She made a kidney stew that I wish I could replicate. It had beef kidney sliced into chunks and vinegar mixed water', She served it over rice to her fancy upper class "friends". They'd always ask how she made it and all she would say is that it was an old English recipe.

I've searched for kidney stew recipes but they all call for beef that is muscle meat. Can you help?
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Old 04-03-2016, 06:24 PM   #13
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I'm a little late, but want to welcome you to DC, Liz.
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Old 04-03-2016, 08:50 PM   #14
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Thank you Cheryl. I don't know how much I'll be able to contribute. I'll do my best. I came here because I need to soak up information like a piece of bread soaks up a sauce.
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Old 04-05-2016, 03:18 PM   #15
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Hello GilliAnne,


I'm a "live in the sticks" person too... off the grid by two miles. Hey, if you're in Ireland, could you PLEASE send me some of your traditional pub style fish 'n chips? Please............. I'll be very nice.


My fish batter comes from my father's side... his mom lived in Dublin until she was 45. Then, they all moved to Canada. They ate fish 'n chips every Friday...


Welcome!
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Old 04-14-2016, 07:09 AM   #16
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Hi Liz,

I'm glad you're feeling comfortable in the forum and finding it helpful.

I used to enjoy cooking sauces with meat, cheese or fish added, along with rice or pasta, but over the years this has changed. I can no longer eat cheese and very early on in our marriage my husband told me he only liked certain kinds of fish that didn't have a lot of bones in them. More recently he has found that he can't eat the sauce type meals without suffering from reflux, so I have tended to stick mainly to the meat and two veg. kind of meals. I would probably mostly cook chicken, pork or lamb in most forms and also scampi, which hubby actually likes, and sometimes I treat myself to fishcakes or some other kind of fish.

I have never made kidney stew, but found this via a Google search. Hope it helps:

Kidney Stew - Recipes - Cooks.com

Gillian
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Old 05-12-2016, 02:39 PM   #17
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Rugged Dude, it was Liz from MS who said she lives in the sticks, not me, although we are quite rural here. Fish on a Friday is traditional in Ireland. We have fish and chip shops, or chippies as they are known, galore here.

Gillian
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Old 05-12-2016, 03:43 PM   #18
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Maybe the stew you're talking about is steak and kidney stew, which uses the cheapest of beef cuts and the kidney which was cheap as well. It comes into the category of poverty cooking, see Alexis Sawyer's cookery for the poor. It's actually delicious, slow cooked in those days over a coal fire for most of the day, so that when people got home after the day's work it would be ready to eat. In actual fact, it would have been a luxury in Ireland, as potatoes were the staple diet. We British have a lot to answer for in that regard, but Irish dishes are delicious and nourishing and simple. As an English person it makes me feel ashamed that under English rule the Irish were, on the whole, malnourished.

di reston

Enough is never as good as a feast Oscar Wilde, who would have endorsed that statement for the people of Ireland.

di reston
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Old 05-12-2016, 04:31 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by di reston View Post
Maybe the stew you're talking about is steak and kidney stew, which uses the cheapest of beef cuts and the kidney which was cheap as well. It comes into the category of poverty cooking, see Alexis Sawyer's cookery for the poor. It's actually delicious, slow cooked in those days over a coal fire for most of the day, so that when people got home after the day's work it would be ready to eat. In actual fact, it would have been a luxury in Ireland, as potatoes were the staple diet. We British have a lot to answer for in that regard, but Irish dishes are delicious and nourishing and simple. As an English person it makes me feel ashamed that under English rule the Irish were, on the whole, malnourished.

di reston

Enough is never as good as a feast Oscar Wilde, who would have endorsed that statement for the people of Ireland.

di reston
Thanks. My mom's contained no muscle meat. This recipe that I found sounds closest to what she made. When I drive in to town to the slaughter house for a beef tongue to pickle I will ask for a couple of kidneys as well. Stores around here don't sell animal parts that are considered gross. Most people don't understand that the most flavorful stuff can be made from what rich people have no use for. Cousins in the Kitchen: Kidney Stew

Although my mother is long dead I still feel sorry for her being embarrassed about being raised dirt poor. I have the greatest respect for folks who make the most of little.
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Old 05-12-2016, 06:33 PM   #20
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wow, i don't know when you find time to cook, with all pets, fish, work. That's amazing. Welcome to DC. Looks like not only you can learn here but share too.
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