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Old 02-05-2012, 06:07 AM   #1
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Introducing Margi Cintrano

Good Morning, Hola, Buenas Días, Bom Día, Guten Morgan,

I have realised that I had not introduced myself yet to the Community Members and so here is a brief intro.

I am a professional publishing Journalist in both the print media sector and online ( website of my own), living and working in the Mediterranean since 1994.

I specialise in Chef Interviews, Mediterranean cuisines, wines and travel features. I am often entitled a Globetrotting Journalist with wings and wheels.

My paternal Grandmother Margherite, inspired my profoundly steeped interest in the culinary and wine world years ago when I worked at her Trattoria in Little Italy, Manhattan. I handled the Front of the House and the Bar dealing with customers, wines, distributors, sales reps, all the administrative and clerical tasks etcetra. She hailed from Lombardia, Italia and had immigrated to N.Y.C. in 1920 with my dad, his twin brother and a younger brother. I had admired her tremendously, and thus, when she left me her recipes, I had been presented with the renovation of her recipes.

On the maternal side, my mom was born in Basel, Switzerland, and had immigrated in the 1920s as a young child to Vancouver, Canada. She met my dad when, she had gone to work in Manhattan as a German and French translator during the 1940s. They were married 66 years. Almost a Guiness Book of Records.

Furthermore, I am a young grandmom with 2 married daughters, one here in Europe and one who is bi-coastal between the St. Augustine coast in the U.S.A. and Nelson, New Zealand.

Additionally, I have 5 grandchildren under the age of five, a set of twin boys, the newcomer baby boy of 3 months ( born this past December 2011), and my other daughter with a 14 month old boy and the only little girl, aged 4 in the family.

My hobbies include Latin Root languages and Philology, the study of the origins of languages. Multi lingual from an early age, I studied Journalism and Latin Languages.

I am pleased to have found this gold mine, D.C. and have enjoyed my recent entry to the Community and hope that my threads provide assistance and innovation to the members.

Thanks,
Margaux Cintrano

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Old 02-05-2012, 09:17 AM   #2
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Is that Marji pronounced with an "h."

Marhee.

Bwahahahahaha.

Seriously, folks, if you want to know about Med food, particularly Spanish, Marji is the one to turn to.

Brook
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Old 02-05-2012, 09:42 AM   #3
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My name is MAR GAUX which is a winery ( Chateaux in French ) in the BOR DEAUX Province of France; pronounced MAR GO ( MAR in Spanish is the sea, coinicidentally, I am a sea enthisiast; and I miss the sea terribly living in Madrid for professional reasons ) ... Chateaux has the same sound: MAR GÓ, BOR DOE, SHA TOE ... Phonetically.


MARGI is a nick name ( MAR GEE ).
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Old 02-05-2012, 10:03 AM   #4
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Howdy and welcome to D.C.!!
As you have discovered, this is one of (in my experience) the friendliest and informative discussion forums you are likely to find. I trust you will enjoy your time spent here.
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Old 02-05-2012, 10:09 AM   #5
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Hi. I looked around at some of your stuff. Now I don't think it would have occurred to me to combine prawns and fennel. We don't see so much fennel usage in recipes here. Or maybe it's because relatively few people keep pastis, but I happen to have some Ricard, so I'll try it next weekend.

Margaux´s Prawns with Fennel « gourmettravelling
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Old 02-05-2012, 11:02 AM   #6
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Prawns and Fennel with Ricard or Pastis or Ouzo

Anise or licorice generally is quite subtlely delicate when paired with Prawns. Fennel is an anise aromatic vegetable and with a touch of Mediterranean licor, such as Ricard from France, Ouzo from Greece or Pastis which is also French - from Provence, it is quite aromatically delectable.

Palates are subjective, so this is my viewpoint. Thanks for your interest in my published work.
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Old 02-05-2012, 11:11 AM   #7
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Product Availability in Mediterranean verses The USA

@ G.L.

A colleague and friend of mine had mentioned, to use Neutral ingredients as you are correct ... Many USA residents or citizens do not have access or do not purchase " Niche " products coming from the Mediterranean countries ... unless they are in very cosmopolitan cities such as Wasington D.C., Los Angeles, San Francisco and NYC ...

It could be difficult to prepare such a dish if one does not have a Farmer´s Market for Fennel or Anise Liquor.

I posted 2 Spanish Tapas very typical through out Spain today as well as my paternal family Bolognese.

Kind regards - must run to catch Superbowl.
M.C.
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Old 02-05-2012, 12:23 PM   #8
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The regular grocery here does always keep fennel, and I've used it mostly in soups, like with leek and potato. They may not always have fennel seed, and I keep it stocked at home, but they always have anise seed, since it's a staple in Mexican cooking. And this area is sufficiently traveled that good liquor stores keep at least Pernod and Ricard and are increasingly keeping Ouzo. All of those, of course, are kept by small specialty grocers, of which Austin has a number, so Greek, Italian, Middle Eastern, and Oriental are pretty well covered.
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Old 02-05-2012, 12:32 PM   #9
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Austin

@ GL.

I am pleased to hear that Austin has a growing interntl. product availability. I recall an absolutely fabulous Wine Shop. It stocked some wonderful selections. Do you know it ? The name is not unusual, though I have it on tip of my tongue, it eludes me at moment.

I do however, remember, Austin has quite a melting pot and lots of former New Yorkers with mixed ethnic backgrounds. Enjoyed alot. Cool restaurants too --- we had some very fabulous dinners there.
Our friend is a Doctor and works in Cancer research there. He is originally from NYC.

Well, have a nice Sunday.
Thanks for posting me a note.
M.C.
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Old 02-05-2012, 01:02 PM   #10
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There are a lot of new ones getting good reviews. But the older establishments might be Austin Wine Merchant and Grape Vine Market. We also now have our first dedicated cheese monger. And more important, I think, we starting to see credible chefs starting unpretentious but excellent places. Just a hole in the wall place in a strip center, but fabulous sandwiches on one side and a very small charcuterie next door. And once a month, they feed the need for serious cheffing with an evening dinner. Last night, the menu was:

Plate of Salumi and Condiments

Goat Sugo “Arrabbiata” with Pecorino Custard and Fried Fideos

Rolled Lamb Loin “Salsa Verde” with Canellini Beans, Merguez, Candied Fennel and Black Olive Smear

Sadly, I was not there. It feels like we are easing toward having more very small, very good places that aren't crushingly expensive.
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